A Frenchman in America - Recollections of Men and Things

A Frenchman in America - Recollections of Men and Things

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of A Frenchman in America, by Max O'RellThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: A Frenchman in AmericaRecollections of Men and ThingsAuthor: Max O'RellRelease Date: May 5, 2010 [EBook #32261]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A FRENCHMAN IN AMERICA ***Produced by Marius Masi, Chris Curnow and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net A FRENCHMAN IN AMERICA. A FRENCHMAN IN AMERICARecollections of Men and ThingsBYMAX O’RELLAUTHOR OF “JONATHAN AND HIS CONTINENT,” “JOHN BULL, JUNIOR,” “JACQUES BONHOMME,” “JOHN BULL AND HIS ISLAND,” ETC. WITH OVER ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY ILLUSTRATIONS BY E. W. KEMBLENEW YORKCASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY104 & 106 Fourth AvenueCopyright, 1891, byCASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY .ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.THE MERSHON COMPANY PRESS,RAHWAY, N. J.CONTENTS.CHAPTER. PAGE.I.—Departure—The Atlantic—Demoralization of the “Boarders”—Betting—The Auctioneer—AnInquisitive Yankee, 1II.—Arrival of the Pilot—First Look at American Newspapers, 11III.—Arrival—The Custom House—Things Look Bad—The Interviewers—First Visits—ThingsLook Brighter—“O Vanity of Vanities,” 14IV.—Impressions of American Hotels, 25V.—My Opening Lecture—Reflections on Audiences I Have ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of A Frenchman in
America, by Max O'Rell
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: A Frenchman in America
Recollections of Men and Things
Author: Max O'Rell
Release Date: May 5, 2010 [EBook #32261]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
A FRENCHMAN IN AMERICA ***
Produced by Marius Masi, Chris Curnow and the
Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net

A FRENCHMAN IN AMERICA.


A FRENCHMAN IN AMERICA
Recollections of Men and Things
BY
MAX O’RELL
AUTHOR OF “JONATHAN AND HIS CONTINENT,”
“JOHN BULL, JUNIOR,” “JACQUES BONHOMME,”
“JOHN BULL AND HIS ISLAND,” ETC.

WITH OVER ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY
ILLUSTRATIONS BY E. W. KEMBLE
NEW YORK
CASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY104 & 106 Fourth Avenue
Copyright, 1891, by
CASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
All rights reserved.
THE MERSHON COMPANY PRESS,
RAHWAY, N. J.
CONTENTS.
P
A
CHAPTER. G
E
.
I.—Departure—The Atlantic—Demoralization
of the “Boarders”—Betting—The Auctioneer— 1
An Inquisitive Yankee,
II.—Arrival of the Pilot—First Look at America 1
n Newspapers, 1
III.—Arrival—The Custom House—Things Loo
1
k Bad—The Interviewers—First Visits—Things
4
Look Brighter—“O Vanity of Vanities,”
2
IV.—Impressions of American Hotels,
5
V.—My Opening Lecture—Reflections on Audi
ences I Have Had—The Man who Won’t Smil 3
e—The One who Laughs too Soon, and Many 7
Others,
VI.—A Connecticut Audience—Merry Meriden 4—A Hard Pull, 8
VII—A Tempting Offer—The Thursday Club—
5
Bill Nye—Visit to Young Ladies’ Schools—The
2
Players’ Club,
VIII.—The Flourishing of Coats-of-Arms in Am
erica—Reflections Thereon—Forefathers Mad 6
e to Order—The Phonograph at Home—The 0
Wealth of New York—Departure for Buffalo,
IX.—Different Ways of Advertising a Lecture 6
—American Impressarios and Their Methods, 6
X.—Buffalo—The Niagara Falls—A Frost—Ro
7
chester to the Rescue of Buffalo—Cleveland
4
—I Meet Jonathan—Phantasmagoria,
XI.—A Great Admirer—Notes on Railway Trav
8
eling—Is America a Free Nation?—A Pleasant
1
Evening in New York,
XII.—Notes on American Women—Comparis
9
ons—How Men Treat Women and Vice Versa
0
—Scenes and Illustrations,
XIII.—More about Journalism in America—A 1
Dinner at Delmonico’s—My First Appearance i 1
n an American Church, 0
XIV.—Marcus Aurelius in America—Chairmen
I Have Had—American, English, and Scotch
1
Chairmen—One who had Been to Boulogne—
2
Talkative and Silent Chairmen—A Trying Occ
4
asion—The Lord is Asked to Allow the Audien
ce to See my Points,
1
XV.—Reflections on the Typical American, 3
7
XVI.—I am Asked to Express Myself Freely o
11
n America—I Meet Mrs. Blank and for the Firs
4
t Time Hear of Mr. Blank—Beacon Street Soci
9
ety—The Boston Clubs,
XVII.—A Lively Sunday in Boston—Lecture in 1
the Boston Theater—Dr. Oliver Wendell Holm 5
es—The Booth-Modjeska Combination, 6
XVIII—St. Johnsbury—The State of Maine—N
ew England Self-control—Cold Climates and F 1
rigid Audiences—Where is the Audience?—All 6
Drunk!—A Reminiscence of a Scotch Audienc 3
e on a Saturday Night,
XIX.—A Lovely Ride to Canada—Quebec, a C
orner of Old France Strayed up and Lost in th 1
e Snow—The French Canadians—The Parties 7
in Canada—Will the Canadians become Yank 2
ees?
XX.—Montreal—The City—Mount Royal—Ca 1
nadian Sports—Ottawa—The Government— 8
Rideau Hall, 2
XXI.—Toronto—The City—The Ladies—The 1
Sports—Strange Contrasts—The Canadian S 9
chools, 1
XXII.—West Canada—Relations between Briti
1
sh and Indians—Return to the United States
9
—Difficulties in the Way—Encounter with an A
6
merican Custom-House Officer,
XXIII.—Chicago (First Visit)—The “Neighborh 2
ood” of Chicago—The History of Chicago—Pu 0
blic Servants—A Very Deaf Man, 3
XXIV.—St. Paul and Minneapolis, the Sister C
ities—Rivalries and Jealousies between Large
2
American Cities—Minnehaha Falls—Wonderfu
11
l Interviewers—My Hat gets into Trouble Agai
4
n—Electricity in the Air—Forest Advertisemen
ts—Railway Speed in America,
XXV.—Detroit—The Town—The Detroit “Free
2
Press”—A Lady Interviewer—The “Unco Guid
2
” in Detroit—Reflections on the Anglo-Saxon “
2
Unco Guid,”
XXVI.—Milwaukee—A Well-filled Day—Reflect 2
ions on the Scotch in America—Chicago Critic 3
isms, 6
2
XXVII.—The Monotony of Traveling in the Sta
4
tes—“Manon Lescaut” in America,
4
XXVIII.—For the First Time I See an America
2
n Paper Abuse Me—Albany to New York—A L
4
ecture at Daly’s Theater—Afternoon Audience
8
s,
XXIX.—Wanderings Through New York—Lect 2
ure at the Harmonie Club—Visit to the Centur 5
y Club, 5
2
XXX.—Visit to the Brooklyn Academy of Musi
5
c—Rev. Dr. Talmage,
7
XXXI.—Virginia—The Hotels—The South—I w
2
ill Kill a Railway Conductor before I Leave Am
6
erica—Philadelphia—Impressions of the Old C
3
ity,
XXXII.—My Ideas of the State of Texas—Wh 2
y I will not Go There—The Story of a Frontier 7
Man, 4
XXXIII.—Cincinnati—The Town—The Suburbs
—A German City—“Over the Rhine”—What is 2a Good Patriot?—An Impressive Funeral—A 7
Great Fire—How It Appeared to Me, and How 9
It Appeared to the Newspaper Reporters,
2
XXXIV.—A Journey if you Like—Terrible Enco
9
unter with an American Interviewer,
6
XXXV.—The University of Indiana—Indianapol 3
is—The Veterans of the Grand Army of the R 0
epublic on the Spree—A Marvelous Equilibrist, 6
XXXVI.—Chicago (Second Visit)—Vassili Vere
3
stchagin’s Exhibition—The “Angelus”—Wagne
1
r and Wagnerites—Wanderings About the Big
1
City—I Sit on the Tribunal,
XXXVII.—Ann Arbor—The University of Michi
3
gan—Detroit Again—The French Out of Franc
2
e—Oberlin College, Ohio—Black and White—
2
Are All American Citizens Equal?
XXXVIII.—Mr. and Mrs. Kendal in New York— 3
Joseph Jefferson—Julian Hawthorne—Miss A 3
da Rehan—“As You Like It” at Daly’s Theater, 0
XXXIX.—Washington—The City—Willard’s Ho
3
tel—The Politicians—General Benjamin Harris
3
on, U. S. President—Washington Society—Ba
2
ltimore—Philadelphia,
3
XL.—Easter Sunday in New York, 4
2
XLI.—I Mount the Pulpit and Preach on the S
3
abbath, in the State of Wisconsin—The Audie
4
nce is Large and Appreciative; but I Probably
7
Fail to Please One of the Congregation,
XLII.—The Origin of American Humor and Its Characteristics—The Sacred and the Profane 3
—The Germans and American Humor—My C 5
orpse Would “Draw,” in my Impressario’s Opin 3
ion,
XLIII.—Good-by to America—Not “Adieu,” but 3
“Au Revoir”—On Board the Teutonic—Home 6
Again, 1

A Frenchman in America.
CHAPTER I.
Departure—The Atlantic—Demoralization of the
“Boarders”—Betting—The Auctioneer—An Inquisitive
Yankee.
On board the “Celtic,” Christmas Week, 1889.
In the order of things the Teutonic was to have sailed
to-day, but the date is the 25th of December, and few
people elect to eat their Christmas dinner on the
ocean if they can avoid it; so there are only twenty-five
saloon passengers, and they have been committed to
the brave little Celtic, while that huge floating palace,
the Teutonic, remains in harbor.
Little Celtic! Has it come to this with her and her
companions, the Germanic, the Britannic, and the rest
that were the wonders and the glory of the ship-
building craft a few years ago? There is something
almost sad in seeing these queens of the Atlanticdethroned, and obliged to rank below newer and
grander ships. It was even pathetic to hear the
remarks of the sailors, as we passed the Germanic
who, in her day, had created even more wondering
admiration than the two famous armed cruisers lately
added to the “White Star” fleet.
.......
I know nothing more monotonous than a voyage from
Liverpool to New York.
Nine times out of ten—not to say ninety-nine times out
of a hundred—the passage is bad. The Atlantic Ocean
has an ugly temper; it has forever got its back up.
Sulky, angry, and terrible by turns, it only takes a few
days’ rest out of every year, and this always occurs
when you are not crossing.
And then, the wind is invariably against you. When you
go to America, it blows from the west; when you come
back to Europe, it blows from the east. If the captain
steers south to avoid icebergs, it is sure to begin to
blow southerly.
Doctors say that sea-sickness emanates from the
brain. I can quite believe them. The blood rushes to
your head, leaving your extremities cold and helpless.
All the vital force flies to the brain, and your legs
refuse to carry you. It is with sea-sickness as it is with
wine. When people say that a certain wine goes up in
the head, it means that it is more likely to go down to
the feet.
There you are, on board a huge construction that