A Voyage Towards the South Pole and Round the World Volume 2
410 Pages
English

A Voyage Towards the South Pole and Round the World Volume 2

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of A Voyage Towards the South Pole and Round the World Volume 2, by James CookThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: A Voyage Towards the South Pole and Round the World Volume 2Author: James CookContributor: Tobias FurneauxRelease Date: May 20, 2005 [EBook #15869]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A VOYAGE TOWARDS THE SOUTH ***-A VOYAGE TOWARDS THE SOUTH POLE, ANDROUND THE WORLD; PERFORMED IN HIS MAJESTY'SSHIPS THE RESOLUTION AND ADVENTURE, IN THEYEARS 1772, 3, 4, AND 5. WRITTEN BY JAMES COOK,COMMANDER OF THE RESOLUTION. IN WHICH ISINCLUDED CAPTAIN FURNEAUX'S NARRATIVE OF HISPROCEEDINGS IN THE ADVENTURE DURING THESEPARATION OF THE SHIPS. IN TWO VOLUMES.ILLUSTRATED WITH MAPS AND CHARTS, AND AVARIETY OF PORTRAITS OF PERSONS AND VIEWSAND PLACES, DRAWN DURING THE VOYAGE BY MR.HODGES, AND ENGRAVED BY THE MOST EMINENTMASTERS.VOLUME II* * *LONDON:PRINTED FOR W STRAHAN AND T CADELL IN THE STRAND.MDCCLXXVII(1777)* * *CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME.BOOK III. From Ulietea to New Zealand.CHAPTER I. Passage from Ulietea to the Friendly Isles, with a Description of several Islands that were discovered, and the Incidents whichhappened in that Track.CHAPTER II. Reception at Anamocka; a ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of A Voyage
Towards the South Pole and Round the World
Volume 2, by James Cook
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: A Voyage Towards the South Pole and
Round the World Volume 2
Author: James Cook
Contributor: Tobias Furneaux
Release Date: May 20, 2005 [EBook #15869]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK A VOYAGE TOWARDS THE SOUTH ***
-A VOYAGE TOWARDS
THE SOUTH POLE,
AND ROUND THE
WORLD; PERFORMED
IN HIS MAJESTY'S
SHIPS THE
RESOLUTION AND
ADVENTURE, IN THE
YEARS 1772, 3, 4, AND
5. WRITTEN BY JAMES
COOK, COMMANDER
OF THE RESOLUTION.
IN WHICH IS INCLUDED
CAPTAIN FURNEAUX'S
NARRATIVE OF HIS
PROCEEDINGS IN THEADVENTURE DURING
THE SEPARATION OF
THE SHIPS. IN TWO
VOLUMES.
ILLUSTRATED WITH
MAPS AND CHARTS,
AND A VARIETY OF
PORTRAITS OF
PERSONS AND VIEWS
AND PLACES, DRAWN
DURING THE VOYAGE
BY MR. HODGES, AND
ENGRAVED BY THE
MOST EMINENT
MASTERS.
VOLUME II
* * *LONDON:
PRINTED FOR W STRAHAN AND T CADELL IN
THE STRAND.
MDCCLXXVII
(1777)
* * *
CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME.
BOOK III. From Ulietea to New Zealand.
CHAPTER I. Passage from Ulietea to the
Friendly Isles, with a Description of several
Islands that were discovered, and the Incidents
which happened in that Track.
CHAPTER II. Reception at Anamocka; a
Robbery and its Consequences, with a Variety
of other Incidents. Departure from the Island. A
sailing Canoe described. Some Observations
on the Navigation of these Islanders. A
Description of the Island, and of those in the
Neighbourhood, with some Account of the
Inhabitants, and nautical Remarks.
CHAPTER III. The Passage from the Friendly
Isles to the New Hebrides, with an Account of
the Discovery of Turtle Island, and a Variety of
Incidents which happened, both before and
after the Ship arrived in Port Sandwich, in the
Island of Mallicollo. A Description of the Port,
the adjacent Country, its Inhabitants, and manyother Particulars.
CHAPTER IV. An Account of the Discovery of
several Islands, and an Interview and Skirmish
with the Inhabitants upon one of them. The
Arrival of the Ship at Tanna, and the Reception
we met with there.
CHAPTER V. An Intercourse established with
the Natives; some Account of the Island, and a
Variety of Incidents that happened during our
Stay at it.
CHAPTER VI. Departure from Tanna; with some
Account of its Inhabitants, their Manners and
Arts.
CHAPTER VII. The survey of the Islands
continued, and a more particular Description of
them.
CHAPTER VIII. An Account of the Discovery of
New Caledonia, and the Incidents that
happened while the Ship lay in Balade.
CHAPTER IX. A Description of the Country and
its Inhabitants; their Manners, Customs, and
Arts.
CHAPTER X. Proceedings on the Coast of New
Caledonia, with Geographical and Nautical
Observations.CHAPTER XI. Sequel of the Passage from New
Caledonia to New Zealand, with an Account of
the Discovery of Norfolk Island; and the
Incidents that happened while the Ship lay in
Queen Charlotte's Sound.
BOOK IV. From leaving New Zealand to our
Return to England.
CHAPTER I. The Run from New Zealand to
Terra del Fuego, with the Range from Cape
Deseada to Christmas Sound, and Description
of that Part of the Coast.
CHAPTER II. Transactions in Christmas Sound,
with an Account of the Country and its
Inhabitants.
CHAPTER III. Range from Christmas Sound,
round Cape Horn, through Strait Le Maire, and
round Staten Land; with an Account of the
Discovery of a Harbour in that Island, and a
Description of the Coasts,
CHAPTER IV. Observations, geographical and
nautical, with an Account of the Islands near
Staten Land, and the Animals found in them,
CHAPTER V. Proceedings after leaving Staten
Island, with an Account of the Discovery of the
Isle of Georgia, and a Description of it,CHAPTER VI. Proceedings after leaving the Isle
of Georgia, with an Account of the Discovery of
Sandwich Land; with some Reasons for there
being Land about the South Pole,
CHAPTER VII. Heads of what has been done in
the Voyage; with some Conjectures concerning
the Formation of Ice-Islands; and an Account of
our Proceedings till our Arrival at the Cape of
Good Hope,
CHAPTER VIII. Captain Furneaux's Narrative of
his Proceedings, in the Adventure, from the
Time he was separated from the Resolution, to
his Arrival in England; including Lieutenant
Burney's Report concerning the Boat's Crew
who were murdered by the Inhabitants of
Queen Charlotte's Sound,
CHAPTER IX. Transactions at the Cape of Good
Hope; with an Account of some Discoveries
made by the French; and the Arrival of the Ship
at St Helena,
CHAPTER X. Passage from St Helena to the
Western Islands, with a Description of the
Island of Ascension and Fernando Noronha,
CHAPTER XI. Arrival of the Ship at the Island of
Fayal, a Description of the Place, and the
Return of the Resolution to England.
Tables of the route of the Resolution and theAdventure, the variation of the compass and
meteorological observations during the voyage.
A Vocabulary of the Language of the Society Isles.
A table, exhibiting at one view, specimens of
different languages spoken in the South Sea, from
Easter Island, westward to New Caledonia, as
observed in the voyage.
Letter from John Ibbetson Esq., secretary to the
Commissioners of
Longitude, to Sir John Pringle, Baronet, P.R.S.
A discourse upon some late improvementsof the
means for preserving the health of mariners,
delivered at the anniversary meeting of the Royal
Society, Nov. 30, 1776. By Sir John Pringle, Bart.
President.
* * * * *
A VOYAGE TOWARDS THE SOUTH POLE, AND
ROUND THE WORLD.
BOOK III.
FROM ULIETEA TO NEW ZEALAND.
CHAPTER I.
Passage from Ulietea to the Friendly Isles, with a
Description of several Islands that were
discovered, and the Incidents which happened inthat Track.
1774 June
On the 6th, being the day after leaving Ulietea, at
eleven o'clock a.m., we saw land bearing N.W.,
which, upon a nearer approach, we found to be a
low reef island about four leagues in compass, and
of a circular form. It is composed of several small
patches connected together by breakers, the
largest lying on the N.E. part. This is Howe Island,
discovered by Captain Wallis, who, I think, sent his
boat to examine it; and, if I have not been
misinformed, found a channel through, within the
reef, near the N.W. part. The inhabitants of Ulietea
speak of an uninhabited island about this situation,
called by them Mopeha, to which they go at certain
seasons for turtle. Perhaps, this may be the same;
as we saw no signs of inhabitants upon it. Its
latitude is 16° 46' S. longitude 154° 8' W.
From this day to the 16th, we met nothing
remarkable, and our course was west southerly;
the winds variable from north round by the east to
S.W., attended with cloudy, rainy, unsettled
weather, and a southerly swell. We generally
brought-to, or stood upon a wind during night; and
in the day made all the sail we could. About half an
hour after sun-rise this morning, land was seen
from the top-mast head, bearing N.N.E. We
immediately altered the course, and steering for it,
found it to be another reef island, composed of five
or six woody islets, connected together by sand-
banks and breakers inclosing a lake, into which we
could see no entrance. We ranged the west and
N.W. coasts, from its southern to its northern-