American Historical and Literary Antiquities, Part 12. - Second Series

American Historical and Literary Antiquities, Part 12. - Second Series

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AMERICAN HISTORICAL ANTIQUITIES, Part 12.
The Project Gutenberg EBook of American Historical and Literary Antiquities, Part 12., by John Jay Smith This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: American Historical and Literary Antiquities, Part 12. Second Series Author: John Jay Smith Release Date: July 15, 2004 [EBook #7912] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES, PART 12 ***
Produced by David Widger. Scanning assistance from Geof Pawlicki using Internet Archive Equipment
AMERICAN HISTORICAL AND LITERARY ANTIQUITIES
By John Jay Smith
Part 12.
Second Series 1860
Original Volume 2, Part Two
Plate 6.
Plate 7.
Plate 8.
Plate 9.
Plate 10.
Plate 11.
Plate 12.
Plate 13.
AMUSING SCENES OF THE REVOLUTION.
JOURNAL OF A YOUNG LADY,
Kept for the amusement of her Friend Deborah Norris, afterwards the wife of Dr. George Logan, of Stenton, Pennsylvania.
UNDER the impression that the British army would very soon take possession of Philadelphia, one of its highly respectable citizens removed his family to North Wales, in the county of Montgomery, Pennsylvania, and the following lively, amusing, and natural journal was written by his daughter, ...

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AMERICAN HISTORICAL ANTIQUITIES, Part 12.
The Project Gutenberg EBook of American Historical and LiteraryAntiquities, Part 12., by John Jay SmithThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: American Historical and Literary Antiquities, Part 12. Second SeriesAuthor: John Jay SmithRelease Date: July 15, 2004 [EBook #7912]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES, PART 12 ***
Produced by David Widger. Scanning assistance from Geof Pawlickiusing Internet Archive Equipment
AMERICAN HISTORICAL
AND
LITERARY ANTIQUITIES
By John Jay Smith
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Part 12.
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Plate 6.         Plate 7.         Plate 8.         Plate 9.         Plate 10.         Plate11.         Plate 12.         Plate 13.
 
 
 
 
 
AMUSING SCENES OF THE REVOLUTION.
JOURNAL OF A YOUNG LADY,
Kept for the amusement of her Friend Deborah Norris,afterwards the wife of Dr. George Logan, of Stenton, Pennsylvania.
UNDER the impression that the British army would very soon takepossession of Philadelphia, one of its highly respectable citizens removed hisfamily to North Wales, in the county of Montgomery, Pennsylvania, and thefollowing lively, amusing, and natural journal was written by his daughter, thenin her fifteenth year. It was addressed to her friend and schoolmate, DeborahNorris, subsequently married to Doctor George Logan, the grandson of JamesLogan, and has been kindly loaned by the family of the writer.To the youth of the writer must be ascribed any inaccuracies of expressionwhich may be discovered. It has been carefully copied from the much-fadedoriginal, and the punctuation only corrected. The Journal gives a peep at themanners of the day, and introduces us to the American army in a mostcharacteristic manner.
To DEBORAH NORRIS.1776-7Though I have not the least shadow of an opportunity to send a letter if I dowrite, I will keep a sort of journal of the time that may expire before I see thee:the perusal of it may some time hence give pleasure in a solitary hour to theeand our S. J.Yesterday, which was the 24th of September, two Virginia officers called atour house, and informed us that the British army had crossed the Schuylkill.Presently after, another person stopped and confirmed what they had said, andthat General Washington and army were near Pottsgrove. Well, thee may besure we were sufficiently scared; however, the road was very still till evening.About seven o'clock we heard a great noise; to the door we all went; a largenumber of waggons, with about three hundred of the Philadelphia militia: theybegged for drink, and several pushed into the house; one of those that enteredwas a little tipsy, and had a mind to be saucy. I then thought it time for me toretreat; so figure me (mightily scared as not having presence of mind enough toface so many of the military) running in at one door and out another, all in ashake with fear; but after a little, seeing the officers appear gentlemanly and thesoldiers civil, I called reason to my aid; my fears were in some measuredispelled, tho' my teeth rattled, and my hand shook like an aspin leaf. They didnot offer to take their quarters with us; so, with many blessings and as manyadieus, they marched off. I have given the most material occurrences ofyesterday faithfully.Fourth day, Sept. 25th.—This day, till 12 o'clock, the road was mighty quiet,when Hobson Jones came riding along. About that time he made a stop at ourdoor, and said the British were at Skippac road; that we should soon see theirlight horse, and a party of Hessians had actually turned into our lane. MyDadda and Mamma gave it the credit it deserved, for he does not keep strictly tothe truth in all respects; but the delicate, chicken-hearted Liddy and me werewretchedly scared. We could say nothing but "Oh! what shall we do? What willbecome of us?" These questions only augmented the terror we were in. Well,the fright went off; we seen no light horse or Hessians. O. Foulke came here inthe evening, and told us that General Washington had come down as far as theTrap, and that General McDougle's brigade was stationed at Montgomery,consisting of about 16 hundred men. This he had from Dr. Edwards, LordStirling's aid-de-camp; so we expected to be in the midst of one army or t'other.5th day, Sept. 26th.—We were unusually silent all the morning; nopassengers came by the house, except to the Mill, and we don't place muchdependance on Mill news. About 12 o'clock, cousin Jesse heard that GeneralHowe's army had moved down towards Philadelphia. Then, my dear, ourhopes and fears were engaged for you. However, my advice is, summon up allyour resolution, call Fortitude to your aid, don't suffer your spirits, to sink, mydear; there's nothing like courage; 'tis what I stand in need of myself, butunfortunately have but little of it in my composition. I was standing in the kitchenabout 12, when somebody came to me in a hurry, screaming, "Sally, Sally, hereare the light horse." This was by far the greatest fright which I had endured; fear