An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Volume 1 - With Remarks on the Dispositions, Customs, Manners, Etc. of The - Native Inhabitants of That Country. to Which Are Added, Some - Particulars of New Zealand; Compiled, By Permission, From - The Mss.         of Lieutenant-Governor King.
445 Pages
English
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An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Volume 1 - With Remarks on the Dispositions, Customs, Manners, Etc. of The - Native Inhabitants of That Country. to Which Are Added, Some - Particulars of New Zealand; Compiled, By Permission, From - The Mss. of Lieutenant-Governor King.

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445 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1, by David Collins This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1 With Remarks On The Dispositions, Customs, Manners, Etc. Of The Native Inhabitants Of That Country. To Which Are Added, Some Particulars Of New Zealand; Compiled, By Permission, From The Mss. Of Lieutenant-Governor King. Author: David Collins Release Date: June 9, 2004 [EBook #12565] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NEW SOUTH WALES, VOL. 1 *** Produced by Col Choat AN ACCOUNT OF THE ENGLISH COLONY IN NEW SOUTH WALES: WITH REMARKS ON THE DISPOSITIONS, CUSTOMS, MANNERS, etc. OF THE NATIVE INHABITANTS OF THAT COUNTRY. TO WHICH ARE ADDED, SOME PARTICULARS OF NEW ZEALAND; COMPILED, BY PERMISSION, FROM THE MSS. OF LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR KING. By DAVID COLLINS, Esquire, LATE JUDGE ADVOCATE AND SECRETARY OF THE COLONY. ILLUSTRATED BY ENGRAVINGS. VOLUME I.

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of An Account of the English Colony in New
South Wales, Vol. 1, by David Collins
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1
With Remarks On The Dispositions, Customs, Manners, Etc. Of The
Native Inhabitants Of That Country. To Which Are Added, Some
Particulars Of New Zealand; Compiled, By Permission, From
The Mss. Of Lieutenant-Governor King.

Author: David Collins
Release Date: June 9, 2004 [EBook #12565]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NEW SOUTH WALES, VOL. 1 ***
Produced by Col Choat
AN ACCOUNT OF THE ENGLISH COLONY IN NEW SOUTH
WALES:
WITH
REMARKS ON THE DISPOSITIONS, CUSTOMS, MANNERS,
etc. OF THE NATIVE INHABITANTS OF THAT COUNTRY.
TO WHICH ARE ADDED,
SOME PARTICULARS OF NEW ZEALAND;
COMPILED, BY PERMISSION,
FROM THE MSS. OF LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR KING.
By DAVID COLLINS, Esquire,
LATE JUDGE ADVOCATE AND SECRETARY OF THE COLONY.
ILLUSTRATED BY ENGRAVINGS.
VOLUME I.
Many might be saved who now suffer an ignominious and an early death;
and many might be so much purified in the furnace of punishment andadversity, as to become the ornaments of that society of which they had
formerly been the bane. The vices of mankind must frequently require the
severity of justice; but a wise State will direct that severity to the greatest
moral and political good. ANON.
LONDON: PRINTED FOR T. CADELL JUN. AND W. DAVIES, IN THE
STRAND.
1798.
TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THOMAS LORD VISCOUNT SYDNEY
One of His Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council,
Chief Justice in Eyre South of Trent,
A Governor of the Charter-house,
and a Vice-President of the Asylum
MY LORD,
The honour that your Lordship has done me, in permitting this volume to goforth into the world under the sanction of your name, demands my warmest
acknowledgments. I can only wish that the Work had been more worthy of its
patron.
The originator of the plan of colonization for New South Wales was too
conspicuous a character to be overlooked by the narrator of its rise and
progress. The benevolent mind of your Lordship led you to conceive this
method of redeeming many lives that might be forfeit to the offended laws; but
which, being preserved, under salutary regulations, might afterward become
useful to society: and to your patriotism the plan presented a prospect of
commercial and political advantage. The following pages will, it is hoped, serve
to evince, with how much wisdom the measure was suggested and conducted;
with what beneficial effects its progress has been attended; and what future
benefits the parent country may with confidence anticipate.
That your Lordship may long live to enjoy those grateful reflections which a
sense of having advanced the public welfare must be presumed to excite; and
that our most gracious sovereign, the father of his people, may long, very long
reign over these kingdoms, and continue to be served by statesmen of tried
talents and integrity, is the earnest prayer of,
MY LORD,
Your Lordship's much obliged,
and most devoted servant,
DAVID COLLINS
Poland Street,
May 25, 1798Chart of the three harbours of Botany Bay, Port Jackson, and Broken
Bay, showing the cultivated grounds in and about the different
settlements, with the course of the Rivers Hawkesbury and Nepean, and
the situation of the wild cattle to the westward of the last-mentioned river.
PREFACE
To the public the following work is with respectful deference submitted by its
author, who trusts that it will be found to comprise much information interesting
in its nature, and that has not been anticipated by any former productions on the
same subject. If he should be thought to have been sometimes too minute in his
detail, he hopes it will be considered, that the transactions here recorded were
penned as they occurred, with the feelings that at the moment they naturally
excited in the mind; and that circumstances which, to an indifferent reader, may
appear trivial, to a spectator and participant seem often of importance. To the
design of this work (which was, to furnish a complete record of the transactions
of the colony from its foundation), accuracy and a degree of minuteness in
detail seemed essential; and on reviewing his manuscript, the author saw little
that, consistently with his plan, he could persuade himself to suppress.
For his labours he claims no credit beyond what may be due to the strictest
fidelity in his narrative. It was not a romance that he had to give to the world; nor
has he gone out of the track that actual circumstances prepared for him, to
furnish food for sickly minds, by fictitious relations of adventures that never
happened, but which are by a certain description of readers perused with
avidity, and not unfrequently considered as the only passages deserving of
notice.
Though to a work of this nature a style ornamental and luxuriant would have
been evidently inapplicable, yet the author has not been wholly inattentive to
this particular, but has endeavoured to temper the dry and formal manner of the
mere journalist, with something of the historian's ease. Long sequestered,
however, from literary society, and from convenient access to books, he had no
other models than those which memory could supply; and therefore does not
presume to think his volume proof against the rigid censor: but to liberal
criticism he submits, with the confidence of a man conscious of having neither
negligence nor presumption to impute to himself. He wrote to beguile the
tedium of many a heavy hour; and when he wrote looked not beyond the
satisfaction which at some future period might be afforded to a few friends, as
well as to his own mind, by a review of those hardships which in common with
his colleagues he had endured and overcome; hardships which in some
degree he supposes to be inseparable from the first establishment of any
colony; but to which, from the peculiar circumstances and description of the
settlers in this instance, were attached additional difficulties.
In the progress of his not unpleasing task, the author began to think that his
labours might prove interesting beyond the small circle of his private friends;
that some account of the gradual reformation of such flagitious characters as
had by many (and those not illiberal) persons in this country been considered
as past the probability of amendment, might be not unacceptable to the
benevolent part of mankind, but might even tend to cherish the seeds of virtue,
and to open new streams from the pure fountain of mercy*.
[* "It often happens," says Dr. Johnson, "that in the loose and thoughtless
and dissipated, there is a secret radical worth, which may shoot out by
proper cultivation; that the spark of heaven, though dimmed and
obstructed, is yet not extinguished, but may, by the breath of counsel andexhortation, be kindled into flame . . .
"Let none too hastily conclude that all goodness is lost, though it may for a
time be clouded and overwhelmed; for most minds are the slaves of
external circumstances, and conform to any hand that undertakes to mould
them; roll down any torrent of custom in which they happen to be caught; or
bend to any importunity that bears hard against them."
Rambler, No. 70.]
Nor was he without hope, that through the humble medium of this history, the
untutored savage, emerging from darkness and barbarism, might find additional
friends among the better-informed members of civilized society.
With these impressions, therefore, he felt it a sort of duty to offer his book to the
world; and should the objects alluded to be in any degree promoted by it, he
shall consider its publication as the most fortunate circumstance of his life.
Occurrences such as he has had to relate are not often presented to the public;
they do not, indeed, often happen. It is not, perhaps, once in a century that
colonies are established in the most remote parts of the habitable globe; and it
is seldom that men are found existing perfectly in a state of nature. When such
circumstances do occur, curiosity, and still more laudable sentiments, must be
excited. The gratification even of curiosity alone might have formed a sufficient
apology for the author; but he has seen too much of virtue even among the
vicious to be indifferent to the sufferings, or backward in promoting the felicities
of human nature.
A few words, he hopes, may be allowed him respecting the colony itself, for
which he acknowledges what, he trusts, will be considered as at least an
excusable partiality. He bore his share of the distresses and calamities which it
suffered; and at his departure, in the ninth year of its growth, with pleasure saw
it wear an aspect of ease and comfort that seemed to bid defiance to future
difficulties. The hardships which it sustained were certainly attributable to
mischance, not to misconduct. The Crown was fortunate in the selection of its
governors, not less with respect to the gentlemen who were sent out expressly
in that capacity, than in those on whom the temporary administration
occasionally devolved.
Under Governor Hunter, who at present presides there, the resources of the
country and the energies of the colonists will assuredly be called forth. The
intelligence, discretion, and perseverance of that officer will be zealously
applied to discover and fix every local advantage. His well-known humanity will
not fall to secure the savage islander from injury or mortification; reconcile him
to the restraints, and induce him to participate in the enjoyments, of civilized
society; and instruct him to appreciate justly the blessings of rational freedom,
whose salutary restrictions are not less conducive to individual benefit than to
the general weal.
With respect to the resources of the settlement, there can be little doubt, that at
this moment it is able to support itself in the article of grain; and the wild stock of
cattle to the westward of the Nepean will soon render it independent on this
country in the article of animal food. As to its utility, beside the circumstance of
its freeing the mother country from the depraved branches of her offspring, in
some instances reforming their dispositions, and in all cases rendering their
labour and talents conducive to the public good, it may prove a valuable
nursery to our East India possessions for soldiers and seamen.
If, beside all this, a whale fishery should be established, another great benefitmay accrue to the parent country from the coast of New South Wales.
The island, moreover, abounds with fine timber in every respect adapted to the
purposes of ship-building: iron too it possesses in abundance. Coal has been
found there, and some veins of copper; and however inconsiderable the
quantity of these articles that has been hitherto found, yet the proof of their
existence will naturally lead to farther research, and most probably terminate in
complete success.
The flax plant grows spontaneously, and may, with the assistance of proper
implements and other necessaries, be turned to very profitable account.
The climate is for the most part temperate and healthy; cattle are prolific; and
fruits and culinary vegetables thrive with almost a tropical luxuriance.
To be brief: Such is the English Colony in New South Wales, for which the
author is anxiously solicitous to obtain the candid consideration of his
countrymen; among whom it has been painful to him to remark a disposition too
prevalent for regarding it with odium and disgust.
London, May 25, 1798
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
SECTION I
Transports hired to carry convicts to Botany Bay
The Sirius and the Supply commissioned
Preparations for sailing
Tonnage of the transports
Persons left behind
Two convicts punished on board the Sirius
The Hyaena leaves the Fleet
Arrival of the fleet at Teneriffe
Proceedings at that island
Some particulars respecting the town of Santa Cruz
An excursion made to Laguna
A convict escapes from one of the transports, but is retaken
Proceedings
The fleet leaves Teneriffe, and puts to sea
SECTION II
Proceed on the voyage
Altitude of the peak of Teneriffe
Pass the isles of Sal, Bonavista, May, and St. Iago
Cross the equator
Progress
Arrive at the Brazils
Transactions at Rio de Janeiro
Some particulars of that town
Sail thence
Passage to the Cape of Good Hope
Transactions there
Some particulars respecting the CapeDepart for New South Wales
SECTION III
Proceed on the voyage
Captain Phillip sails onward in the Supply, taking with him three of the
transports
Pass the island of St. Paul
Weather, January 1788
The South Cape of New Holland made
The Sirius and her convoy anchor in the harbour of Botany Bay.
CHAPTER I
Arrival of the fleet at Botany Bay
The governor proceeds to Port Jackson, where it is determined to fix the
settlement
Two French ships under M. de la Perouse arrive at Botany Bay
The Sirius and convoy arrive at Port Jackson
Transactions
Disembarkation
Commission and letters patent read
Extent of the territory of New South Wales
Behaviour of the convicts
The criminal court twice assembled
Account of the different courts
The Supply sent with some settlers to Norfolk Island
Transactions
Natives
Weather
CHAPTER II
Broken Bay visited
M. de la Perouse sails
Transactions
The Supply returns
Lord Howe Island discovered
The ships for China sail
Some convicts wounded by the natives
Scurvy
New store-house
Necessary orders and appointments
Excursions into the country
New branch of the harbour into Port Jackson
Sheep
CHAPTER III
Transactions
Transports sail for China
The Supply sails for Lord Howe Island
Return of stock in the colony in May
The Supply returns
Transactions
A convict wounded
Rush-cutters killed by the natives
Governor's excursionHis Majesty's birthday
Behaviour of the convicts
Cattle lost
Natives
Proclamation
Earthquake
Transports sail for England
Supply sails for Norfolk Island
Transactions
Natives
Convicts wounded
CHAPTER IV
Heavy rains
Public works
Sheep stolen
Prince of Wale's birthday
Fish
Imposition of a convict
Natives
Apprehensive of a failure of provisions
Natives
Judicial administration
A convict murdered
CHAPTER V
Settlement of Rose Hill
The Golden Grove returns from Norfolk Island
The storeships sail for England
Transactions
James Daley tried and executed for housebreaking
Botany Bay examined by the governor
A convict found dead in the woods
Christmas Day
A native taken and brought up to the settlement
Weather
Climate
Report of deaths from the departure of the fleet from England to the
31st of December 1788
CHAPTER VI
New Year's Day
Convicts, how employed
Their disposition to idleness and vice
Her Majesty's birthday kept
Natives
Captain Shea dies
Regulations respecting the convicts
Instances of their misconduct
Transactions
The Supply sails for Norfolk Island
Public Works
Natives
Convicts killedStores robbed
The Supply returns
Insurrection projected at Norfolk Island
Hurricane there
Transactions at Rose Hill
CHAPTER VII
Neutral Bay
Smallpox among the natives
Captain Hunter in the Sirius returns with supplies from the Cape of Good Hope
Middleton Island discovered
Danger of wandering in the forests of an unknown country
Convicts
The King's birthday kept
Convicts perform a play
A reinforcement under Lieutenant Cresswell sent to Norfolk Island
Governor Phillip makes an excursion of discovery
Transactions
Hawkesbury River discovered
Progress at Rose Hill
Important papers left behind in England
CHAPTER VIII
Barracks
Stock
Intelligence from Norfolk Island
Police established at the principal settlement
A successful haul of fish
A soldier tried for a rape
Provisions begin to fail
Natives
A launch completed
Rats
Ration reduced to two-thirds
Sirius returns to the Cove
One of her mates lost in the woods
Supply sails for Norfolk Island
Utility of the night watch
A female convict executed for house-breaking
Two natives taken
Serious charge against the assistant commissary satisfactorily cleared up
Lieutenant Dawes's excursion
The Supply returns
Transactions
CHAPTER IX
A convict made a free settler
A pleasing delusion
Extraordinary supply of fish
Caesar's narrative
Another convict wounded by the natives
The Supply arrives from Norfolk Island
A large number of settlers sent thither on board the Sirius and Supply
Heavy rainsScarcity of provisions increasing in an alarming degree
Lieutenant Maxwell's insanity
News brought of the loss of the Sirius
Allowance of provisions still further reduced
The Supply sent to Batavia for relief
Robberies frequent and daring
An old man dies of hunger
Rose Hill
Salt and fishing-lines made
The native escapes
Transactions
CHAPTER X
The Lady Juliana transport arrives from England
The Guardian
His Majesty's birthday
Thanksgiving for His Majesty's recovery
The Justinian storeship arrives
Full ration ordered
Three transports arrive
Horrid state of the convicts on board
Sick landed
Instance of sagacity in a dog
A convict drowned
Mortality and number of sick on the 13th
Convicts sent to Rose Hill
A town marked out there
Works in hand at Sydney
Instructions respecting grants of land
Mr. Fergusson drowned
Convicts' claims on the master of the Neptune
Transactions
Criminal Court
Whale
CHAPTER XI
Governor Phillip wounded by a native
Intercourse opened with the natives
Great haul of fish
Convicts abscond with a boat
Works
Want of rain
Natives
Supply returns from Batavia
Transactions there
Criminal Courts
James Bloodworth emancipated
Oars found in the woods
A convict brought back in the Supply
A boat with five people lost
Public works
A convict wounded by a native
Armed parties sent out to avenge him
A Dutch vessel arrives with supplies from Batavia
Decrease by sickness and casualties in 1790