Better Homes in America - Plan Book for Demonstration Week October 9 to 14, 1922
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Better Homes in America - Plan Book for Demonstration Week October 9 to 14, 1922

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Better Homes in America, by Mrs W.B. MeloneyCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloadingor redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do notchange or edit the header without written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of thisfile. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can alsofind out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****Title: Better Homes in AmericaAuthor: Mrs W.B. MeloneyRelease Date: April, 2005 [EBook #7992] [This file was first posted on June 10, 2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK, BETTER HOMES IN AMERICA ***E-text prepared by Joshua Hutchinson, Charles Franks, and the Online Distributed Proofreading TeamBETTER HOMES IN AMERICAPlan Bookfor Demonstration Week October 9 to 14, 1922THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTONJuly 21, 1922.My dear Mrs. Meloney:I am directed by the President to assure you of his earnest ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Better Homes inAmerica, by Mrs W.B. MeloneyCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Besure to check the copyright laws for your countrybefore downloading or redistributing this or anyother Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen whenviewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do notremove it. Do not change or edit the headerwithout written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and otherinformation about the eBook and ProjectGutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included isimportant information about your specific rights andrestrictions in how the file may be used. You canalso find out about how to make a donation toProject Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain VanillaElectronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and ByComputers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousandsof Volunteers!*****Title: Better Homes in America
Author: Mrs W.B. MeloneyRelease Date: April, 2005 [EBook #7992] [This filewas first posted on June 10, 2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERGEBOOK, BETTER HOMES IN AMERICA ***E-text prepared by Joshua Hutchinson, CharlesFranks, and the Online Distributed ProofreadingTeamBETTER HOMES IN AMERICAPlan Bookfor Demonstration Week October 9 to 14, 1922
THE WHITE HOUSEWASHINGTONJuly 21, 1922.My dear Mrs. Meloney:I am directed by the President to assure you of hisearnest endorsement of the Better HomesCampaign which has been launched by theAdvisory Council and is being carried on byrepresentative women of America. He regards thecampaign as of particular importance, because itplaces emphasis not only upon home ownership,which he regards as absolutely elemental in thedevelopment of the best citizenship, but uponfurnishing, sanitation and equipment of the home.The President feels that as many millions of dollarsand the best minds of this generation have beendevoted to improve factory conditions, the home isdeserving of its share of the same intensiveconsideration. There are twenty millions of house-keepers in America. For them, the home is theirindustrial center as well as their place of abode,and it is felt that altogether too little attention hasbeen paid to lightening the labors and bettering theworking conditions of these women.The President feels that the women, who are sosuccessfully conducting this campaign are entitledto all consideration and recognition, and he hopes
that every community in America will exhibit amodel home.Your sincerely,Secretary to the President.Mrs. W. B. Meloney, Sec'y., Advisory Council forBetter Homes Campaign, 223 Spring Street, NewYork City, N. Y.
BETTER HOMESDEMONSTRATION WEEKAdvisory CouncilCALVIN COOLIDGE Vice-President of the UnitedStatesHERBERT HOOVER Secretary of CommerceHENRY C. WALLACE Secretary of AgricultureJAMES JOHN DAVIS Secretary of LaborDr. HUGH S. CUMMING Surgeon-General UnitedStates Public HealthServiceDr. JOHN JAMES TIGERT U. S. Commissioner ofEducationC. W. PUGSLEY Assistant Secretary of AgricultureJOHN M. GRIES Director Division of Building andHousing, Dept. ofCommerceJULIUS H. BARNES President Chamber ofCommerce of the United StatesJOHN IHLDER Director Housing Conditions,
Chamber of Commerce of theUnited StatesDONN BARBER Fellow American Institute ofArchitectsJOHN BARTON PAYNE Chairman CentralCommittee American Red CrossLIVINGSTON FARRAND Chairman National HealthCouncilMrs. THOMAS G. WINTER President GeneralFederation of Women's ClubsMRS. LENA LAKE FORREST President NationalFederation of Business andProfessional Women's Clubs*****    Bureau of Information, THE DELINEATOR, 223Spring StreetIN AMERICA—October Ninth to FourteenthCo-operating GovernorsALASKA SCOTT C. BONE, GovernorARIZONA THOS. E. CAMPBELL, GovernorARKANSAS T. C. McRAE, Governor
COLORADO O. H. SHOUP, GovernorFLORIDA CARY A. HARDEE, GovernorIDAHO D. W. DAVIS, GovernorINDIANA W. T. McCRAY, GovernorKANSAS HENRY J. ALLEN, GovernorKENTUCKY E. P. MORROW, GovernorMARYLAND A. C. RITCHIE, GovernorMASSACHUSETTS C. H. COX, GovernorMISSISSIPPI LEE M. RUSSELL, GovernorMISSOURI A. M. HYDE, GovernorNEBRASKA S. R. McKELVlE, GovernorNEVADA E. D. BOYLE, GovernorOHIO H. L. DAVIS, GovernorOREGON B. W. OLCOTT, GovernorPENNSYLVANIA W. C. SPROUL, GovernorSOUTH CAROLINA WILSON G. HARVEY,GovernorSOUTH DAKOTA W. H. McMASTER, GovernorTENNESSEE ALFRED A. TAYLOR, GovernorUTAH CHAS. R. MABEY, GovernorVERMONT JAMES HARTNESS, GovernorVIRGINIA E. L. TRINKLE, GovernorWYOMING ROBERT D. CAREY, Governor    *****New York City Secretary, Mrs. William BrownMeloneyBetter Homes
By CALVIN COOLIDGEWe spend too much time in longing for the thingsthat are far off and too little in the enjoyment of thethings that are near at hand. We live too much indreams and too little in realities. We cherish toomany impossible projects of setting worlds in order,which are bound to fail. We consider too little plansfor putting our own households in order, whichmight easily be made to succeed. A large part ofour seeming ills would be dispelled if we could butturn from the visionary to the practical. We needthe influence of vision, we need the inspiring powerof ideals, but all these are worthless unless theycan be translated into positive actions.The world has been through a great spiritual andmoral awakening in these last few years. There arethose who fear that this may all be dissipated. Itwill be unless it can be turned into somethingactual. In our own country conditions havedeveloped which make this more than ever easy ofaccomplishment. It ought to be expressed notmerely in official and public deeds, but in personaland private actions. It must come through arealization that the great things of life are notreserved for the enjoyment of a few, but are withinthe reach of all.There are two shrines at which mankind hasalways worshipped, must always worship: the altarwhich represents religion, and the hearthstonewhich represents the home.
These are the product of fixed beliefs and fixedmodes of living. They have not grown up byaccident; they are the means, deliberate, mature,sanctified, by which the human race, in harmonywith its own great nature, is developed andperfected. They are at once the source and theresult of the inborn longing for what is completed,for what has that finality and security required togive to society the necessary element of stability.The genius of America has long been directed tothe construction of great highways and railroads,the erection of massive buildings for the promotionof trade and the transaction of public business. Ithas supplied hospitals, institutions of learning andplaces of religious worship. All of these are worthyof the great effort and the sustained purpose whichalone has made them possible. They contribute tothe general welfare of all the people, but they areall too detached, too remote; they do not make thenecessary contribution of a feeling of proprietorshipand ownership. They do not complete the circuit.They are for the people, but not of the people.They do not satisfy that longing which exists inevery human breast to be able to say: "This is"mine.We believe in American institutions. We believethat they are justified by the light of reason, and bythe result of experience. We believe in the right ofself-government. We believe in the protection ofthe personal rights of life and liberty and theenjoyment of the rewards of industry. We believe inthe right to acquire, to hold, and transmit property.
We believe in all that which is represented underthe general designation of a republic.But while we hold that these principles are soundwe do not claim that they have yet become fullyestablished. We do not claim that our institutionsare yet perfected.It is of little avail to assert that there is an inherentright to own property unless there is an openopportunity that this right may be enjoyed in a fairdegree by all. That which is referred to in suchcritical terms as capitalism cannot prevail unless itis adapted to the general requirements. Unless itbe of the people it will cease to have a place underour institutions, even as slavery ceased.It is time to demonstrate more effectively thatproperty is of the people. It is time to transfersome of the approbation and effort that has goneinto the building of public works to the building,ornamenting, and owning of private homes by thepeople at large— attractive, worthy, permanenthomes.Society rests on the home. It is the foundation ofour institutions. Around it are gathered all thecherished memories of childhood, theaccomplishments of maturity, and the consolationsof age. So long as a people hold the home sacredthey will be in the possession of a strength ofcharacter which it will be impossible to destroy.Apparently the world at large, certainly our owncountry, is turning more and more for guidance to