Bring Me His Ears

Bring Me His Ears

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Bring Me His Ears, by Clarence E. Mulford This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Bring Me His Ears Author: Clarence E. Mulford Release Date: March 19, 2010 [EBook #31699] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK BRING ME HIS EARS ***
Produced by Chris Curnow, Michael, Graeme Mackreth and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
Tom pushed on ahead to reconnoiter the Upper Spring [Page262]
"Bring Me His Ears" By CLARENCE E. MULFORD AUTHOR OF "Bar 20," "Bar 20 Days," "Bar 20-Three," "Buck Peters,  Ranchman," "The Coming of Cassidy," "Hopalong Cassidy," "Johnny Nelson," "The Man from Bar 20," "Tex," etc.
A.L. BURT COMPANY Publishers New York Published by arrangement with A.C. McClurg & Co. Printed in U.S.A.
Copyright A.C. McClurg & Co. 1922 Published October, 1922 Copyrighted in Great Britain Printed in the United States of America
"Bring Me His Ears"
CHAPTER I HAWKENS' GUN STORE The tall, lanky Missourian leaning against the corner of a ramshackle saloon on Locust Street, St. Louis, Missouri—the St. Louis of the early forties—turned his whiskey-marked face toward his companion, a short and slender Mexican trader, sullenly listening to the latter's torrent of words, which was accompanied by many and excitable gesticulations. The Missourian shook his head in reply to the accusations of his companion. "But he was on thee boat weeth us! exclaimed the other. "An' you lose heem—lak theese!" the sharp snap of " his fingers denoted magic. "Thar ain't no use o' gittin' riled," replied Schoolcraft. "How in tarnation kin a man keep th' trail o' a slippery critter like him in these yere crowds? I'll git sight o' him, right yere." "That ees w'at you say," rejoined the Mexican, shrugging his shoulders. "But w'at weelI to sayle Gobernador? Theesehombre Boyd—he know vera many t'eengs—too vera many t'eengs—an' he Tomaz ensultle Gobernador.Madre de Diosat the thought. "W'en I get thee message,—sooch ensult!" He shivered I tr-remble! It say 'Br-ring heem to me—or breeng me his ears!' I am tol' to go to Señor Schoolcr-raft at Eendependence—he ees thee man. I go; an' then you lose heem! Bah! You do not know theese Manuel Armijo,le Gobernador de Santa Fe, my fren'—I tr-remble!"
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"You need a good swig, that's whatyouneed," growled Schoolcraft. "An' if ye warn't a chuckle-head," he said with a flash of anger, "we wouldn't 'a' come yere at all; I told ye he's got th' prairie fever an' shore would come back to Independence, whar I got friends; but no—we had ter foller him!" He spat emphatically. "Thar warn't no sense to it, nohow!" The other waved his arms. "But w'y we stan' here, lak theese? W'y you do no'teeng?" "Now you look a-here, Pedro," growled the Missourian, his sullen gaze passing up and down the slender Mexican. "Ye don't want ter use no spurs onthis critter. I ain't no greaser! If ye'll hold them arms still fer a minute I'll tell ye somethin'. Thar's three ways o' gittin' a deer: one is trailin'—which we've found ain't no good; another is layin' low near a runway—which isyerjob; th' third is watchin' th' salt lick—which ismyjob. You go down ter th' levee, git cached among them piles o' freight an' keep a lookout on th' landin' stage o' th'Belle. I'll stick right yere on this corner an' watch th' lick, which is Hawkens' gun store. He lost his pistol overboard, comin' down th' river, didn't he? An' th'Belleain't sailin' till arter ten o'clock, is she? One o' us is bound ter git sight o' him, fer he'll shore go back by th' river; an' if thar's any place in this town whar a plainsman'll go, it's that gun store, down th' street. You do what I say, or you an' Armijo kin go plumb ter hell! An' don't ye wave yer[Pg 3] fists under my nose no more, Pedro; I might misunderstand ye." The Mexican's face brightened. "Eet ees good, vera good, Señor Schoolcraft. Hah! You have thee br-rains, my fren'. Armijo, he say: 'Pedro, get heem to Santa Fe, if you can. If you can't, then keel heem, an' breeng me hees ears.'Bueno!I go, señor. I gopronto.Buena dia!" "Then git," growled Schoolcraft. "Thar's that long-faced clerk o' Hawkens' openin' th' shop. Now remember: this side o' th' junction o' th' Oregon trail I'm only ter watch him. If he goes southwest from th' junction, yer job begins; if he heads up fer th' Platte, my job starts. I ain't got no love fer him, but I'm hopin' he heads fer Oregon an' gets killed quick! I hate ter think o' a white man in Armijo's paws. An' if he hangs 'round th' settlements, we toss up fer th' job. If that's right,vamoose." "Eet ees r-right to thee vera letter," whispered the Mexican, rubbing his hands. "Eef only I can get heem to Santa Fe—ah, my fren'!" "Yer wuss nor a weasel," grunted the Missourian, slight prickles playing up and down his spine. "Better git down to them freight piles!" Schoolcraft watched his scurrying friend until he slipped around a corner and was lost to sight; then he turned and looked up the street at the gun shop of Jake and Samuel Hawken, whose weapons were renowned all over that far-stretching western wilderness. Shrugging his shoulders, he glanced in disgust at the heavy, patented repeating rifle in his hand and, letting his personal affairs take precedence over those of the distant[Pg 4] Mexican tyrant, he swung down the street, crossed it, and entered the famous gun shop. He risked nothing by the move, for the store was the Mecca of frontiersmen, and a trip to St. Louis was hardly complete without a visit to the shop. The Hawkens were established, so much so that they were to be singled out by one of the famous Colt family with a partnership proposition. The fame of their rifles had rolled westward to the Rockies and beyond. They were to be found across the Canadian and Mexican boundaries and wherever hunters and trappers congregated, who scorned the Northwest fusil as fit only for trading purposes, laughed in their sleeves at the preposterous length and general inefficiency of the Hudson Bay muskets, and contentedly patted the stocks of their Hawkens'. There is a tradition that the length of the Hudson Bay muskets, which often rose over the head of a tall man while the butt rested on the ground, was due to the fact that the ignorant Indians could obtain a white man's gun only by stacking up beaver skins until the pile was as high as the musket. Even worse than the flintlock trade guns were theescopetassouth, matchlocks of prodigious bore and noof the accuracy or power, which were used by many of the Mexicans. That swarthy-skinned race which suffered under the tyranny of Armijo seemed to believe that anything which used powder was a weapon. The rank and file of the Mexicans were courageous and usually fought bravely until deserted by their officers, or until they were fully convinced that the miscellaneous junk with which they were armed was worse than useless. It can hardly be expected that men shooting pebbles, nails, and what-not out of nearly useless blunderbusses; or[Pg 5] using bows, arrows, and lances will stand up very long against straight-shooting troops armed with the best rifles; add to this the great difference in morale, and the ever-present distrust of the officers, and a fair and honest understanding may be arrived at. Hawkens' clerk took down one of the great rifles to go over it with an oiled rag, which was another example of painting the lily. The weapon was stocked to the muzzle and shot a bullet weighing thirty-two to the pound, each thus being an honest half-ounce of lead. It was brass mounted and had a poorly done engraving of a buffalo on the trap in its stock. He turned to replace it and take down another when the sound of the opening door made him pause and face the incoming customer. The newcomer was neither hunter nor trapper, gambler nor merchant, to judge from his nondescript and mixed attire. His left hand had an ugly welt running across the base of the palm and it had not been healed long enough to have lost its distinctive color. In his right hand he carried a rifle which was new to that part of the country, and he slid it onto the counter. "Swap ye," he gruffly said, stepping back and leering at the clerk. "Too ak'ard fer me. Can't git used ter it, nohow. I like a stock with a big drop—this un makes me hump my head down like a bull buffaler. That's th' wuss o' havin' a long neck." The clerk glanced at the repeating Colt and then at the injured hand. The faintest possible suggestion of a knowing smile flitted across his face, and he shook his head. "Those are too dangerous," he replied. "We don't handle them." "W'y, that's a fine rifle!" growled the customer, a heavy frown settling on his coarse face. "Six shots, with them[Pg 6] newfangled caps, without re-loadin'. She's a plumb fine weapon!" "Looks good," laughed the clerk; "but we don't care to handle them." "They've sorta put yer nose outer j'int, ain't they?" sneered the customer. "Wall, ye kin bet yer peltries I wouldn't be givin' ye th' chanct to handlethisun," he angrily declared, "if it had a bigger drop an' warn't so ak'ard fer a man like me. Ye can't find a rifle in yer danged store as kin hold a candle ter it. I bet ye ain't never seen one afore!" "It's our business to keep informed," responded the clerk, still smiling. "We heard all about that rifle as soon as it was patented " . "But ye allus could sell a gun like this un," persisted the scowling owner. "Ye must have a hull passel o' tenderfeet a-comin' in yere." The clerk frowned and his voice became slightly edged. "The reputation of Hawkens' is a valuable asset. It was acquired in two ways: honest goods and fair dealing. Most tenderfeet ask us for a gun that we can recommend; we cannot recommend that rifle. Do you care to look at one that will not shoot through the palm of your extended hand after it gets hot from rapid shooting?" "I got ye thar, pardner!" retorted the customer. "I done that with a poker. Ye don't seem anxious ter do no business." "Our stock and my time are at your disposal," replied the clerk; "but we cannot take that Colt in part payment." "Wall, ye don't have ter: I know a man as will; an' he ain't all swelled up, neither. You an' yer rifles kin go ter h—l[Pg 7] together!" He jerked the Colt from the counter and stamped out, cursing at every step, and slammed the door behind him so hard that it shook the shop. Thoroughly angered, he strode down the street and had gone a block before he remembered that he was to keep watch on the shop. Cursing anew, he wheeled and went back on the other side of the street and stopped at the corner of a ramshackle saloon. The clerk was taking down another rifle when the door opened again and he wheeled aggressively, but his frown was swiftly wiped out by a smile. The newcomer was somewhere in the twenties, stood six feet two in his moccasins, and had the broad, sloping shoulders that tell of great strength. He was narrow waisted and sinewy and walked with a step light and springy. Dressed in buckskin from the soles of his feet to the top of his head, he had around his waist a broad belt, from which hung powder horn, bullet pouch, a container for caps, a buckskin bag for spare patches, a bullet mold, and a heavy, honest skinning knife. Slung from a strap over one shoulder hung his "possible" bag, containing various small articles necessary to his calling. In his hand was a double-barreled rifle which he seemed to be excited about. "Mr. Jarvis!" he exclaimed, offering the weapon for inspection. "Tell me what you think of this?" The clerk chuckled and his eyes lighted with pleasure. "I've seen it, or its twin, before. English, fine sights, shooting about thirty-six balls to the pound. They're pointed, aren't they? Ah-ha! I thought so." He took the gun and examined it carefully. "Just what I've been trying to tell Mr. Jacob Hawken. Look at those nipples: large[Pg 8] diameter across the threaded end, making it much easier to worry out wet powder by removing them and working with a bent wire from that end. We have to work at the ball with a screw, and that is no easy task after the patch paper becomes swollen. With this rifle you can replace the wet powder with dry and fire the ball out in much less time. Where did you get it, Mr. Boyd?" The lainsman lau hed exultin l . "Won it on the boat comin down, from an En lish s ortsman who was
returning home. He said it was a fine weapon, and I thought so; but I wanted your opinion." "Take it out on the Grand Prairie and try it out. From what I can see here it is a remarkably fine rifle; but handsome is, you know " . "I've tried it out already," laughed the other. "It's the best rifle in this country, always excepting, of course, the Hawken!" "As long as you put it that way I shall have to agree with you. Did you see the man who left a few moments before you came in?" Boyd nodded shortly. "Yes; but I don't care to discuss him beyond warning you to look out for him. He deals in draft animals in Independence, has the name of being slippery, and is known as Ephriam Schoolcraft. However, I'm not an unprejudiced critic, for there is not the best of feelings between us, due to an unprincipled trick he tried to play on my partner." His face clouded for a moment. His partner had joined the ill-fated Texan Santa Fe Expedition and had lost his life at the hands of one of Armijo's brutal officers, for whom Tom Boyd had an abiding hatred. On his last visit to Santa Fe he had shown it so actively that only his wits and forthright[Pg 9] courage had let him get out of the city with his life. "Well, to change the subject, I lost my pistol in the river, and I've heard a great deal about a revolving Colt pistol from some Texans I met. It shoots six times without re-loading and is fitted for caps. Got one?" "Two," chuckled Jarvis. "A large bore and a smaller. They are fine weapons, but never rest the barrel on your other hand when you shoot." "I'll remember that. Which size would you recommend for me?" "The larger, by all means. We are expecting a shipment by express down the Ohio and it should reach us almost any day now. It took the Texans to prove their worth and give them their reputation." "Fit it with caps, mold and whatever it needs. I need caps and powder for the rifle, too. First quality Kentucky, or Dupont, of course." The purchase completed Jarvis watched his friend and customer distribute them over his person and then asked a question. "Where to now, Mr. Boyd?" "Independence and westward," answered the other. "Spring is upon us, the prairie grass is getting longer all the time, and Independence is as busy and crowded as an ant hill. All kinds of people are coming in by train and river, bound for the trade to Santa Fe and Chihuahua, and for far away Oregon." His eyes shone with enthusiasm. "The homesteaders interest me the most, for it is to them that we will owe our western empire. The trappers, hunters, and traders have prepared the way, but they are only a passing phase. The first two will[Pg 10] vanish and in their places the homesteaders will take root and multiply. Think of it, Mr. Jarvis, now our frontiers are only halfway across the continent; what an empire that will some day become!" Jarvis nodded thoughtfully and looked up. "What does your father say to all this, especially after the news last fall about your narrow escape in Santa Fe?" Boyd shrugged his shoulders. "Father set his heart on me becoming his junior partner, and to passing his work over to me when he was ready to retire. Two generations of surgeons, is his boast; and in me he hoped to make it three. Against that, the West needs men! Those Oregon-bound wagons bring tears to my eyes. They have cast my die for me. I am on my way to Fort Bridger and Fort Hall and the valley of the Columbia, to lend my strength and little knowledge of the open to those who need it most." Jarvis nodded his head in sympathy, for he had heard many speak nearly the same thoughts; indeed, at times, the yearning to leave behind him the dim old shop and the noisy, bustling city beset him strongly, despite his years of a life unfitting him for the hardships of the prairies and mountains. Being able to read Greek and Latin was no asset on the open trail; although schoolmasters would be needed in that new country. "I know how you feel, Mr. Boyd. Have you seen your father since you landed?" Tom reluctantly shook his head. "It would only reopen the old bitterness and lead to further estrangement. No man shall ever speak to me again as he did—not even him. If you should see him, Jarvis, tell him I asked you to assure him of my affection."[Pg 11] "I shall be glad to do that," replied the clerk. "You missed him by only two days. He asked for you and wished you success, and said your home was open to you when you returned to resume your studies. I think, in his heart, he is proud of you, but too stubborn to admit it." As he spoke he chanced to glance through the window of the store. "Don't look around," he warned. "I want to tell you that Schoolcraft and a Mexican just passed the shop, peered in at you with more than passing interest and went on. I suppose it's nothing, though." "It's enough to make me keep my eyes open," replied Tom, sighting his new rifle at the great clock on the wall, which seemed to move a little faster under the threat. "I thought they were watching me on the boat. Armijo's vindictive enough to go to almost any length. He isn't accustomed to having his beast face slapped." Jarvis' jaw dropped in sheer amazement. "You mean—do I understand—eh, you mean—you slappedhis face?" "So hard that it hurt my hand; I'll wager his teeth are loose," replied Tom, his interest on his new weapon. "Er—slappedGovernorpersisted Jarvis from the momentum of his amazement.Armijo's face?" "The Governor of the Department of New Mexico," replied the hunter. Jarvis drew a sleeve across his forehead and carefully felt for the high stool behind him. Automatically climbing upon it he seated himself with great care and then, remembering that his customer was standing, slid off it apologetically. He was gazing at his companion as though he were some strange, curious animal. "Eh—would you mind telling mewhy?" he asked.[Pg 12] "He offended me; and if I'd known then what I found out later I would have broken every bone in his pompous carcass and thrown him to the dogs!" His face had reddened a little and the veins on his forehead were beginning to stand out. Jarvis examined the clock with almost hypnotic interest. "And how did he offend you, Mr. Boyd, if I may inquire?" "Oh, the beast came swaggering along the street, followed at a respectful distance by a crowd of his boot-lickers, and pushed me out of his way. I asked him who in hell he thought he was, in choice Spanish, and the conceited turkey-gobbler reached for his saber. The more I see of this gun, Jarvis, the more I like it." "Yes, indeed; and then what, Mr. Boyd?" "Huh?" "He reached for his saber—and then?" "Oh," laughed Tom. "I helped him draw it, and broke it across his own knee. He called me a choice name and I slapped his face. You should have seen the boot-lickers! Before they could get their senses back and make up their minds about rushing my pistol I had slipped through a store, out of the back and into a place I know well, where I waited till dark. I understand there was quite a lot of excitement for a day or so." "I dare say—I dare say there might have been," admitted Jarvis. "In fact, I am sure there would be.Damn it, Tom, would you mind shaking hands with me?" CHAPTER II ABOARD THEMISSOURI BELLE[Pg 13] Tom wended his way to the levee and as he passed the last line of buildings and faced the great slope leading to the water's edge his eyes kindled. Two graceful stern-wheel packets were moving on the river, the smaller close to the nearer bank on her way home from the treacherous Missouri; the larger, curving well over toward the Illinois shore, was heading downstream for New Orleans. Their graceful lines, open bow decks with the great derricks supporting the huge landing stages, and the thick, powerful masts on each edge of the lower deck toward the bow, each holding up the great spar so necessary for Mississippi river navigation; the tall stacks with the initials of the boat against a lattice work between; the regular spacing of windows and doors in the cabins, and the clean white of their hulls and superstructure, rendered more vivid by contrast with the tawny flood on all sides of them, made a striking and picturesque sight. Each had a curving tail of boiling brown water behind, and a bone in its teeth. These river boats were modeled on trim and beautiful lines and were far from being crude, frontier makeshifts. Several Mackinaw boats moved anglingly across the current from the other shore, and a keelboat glided down the river for New Orleans, or to turn u the Ohio for Pittsbur , hel ed in the current b a dirt , s uare[Pg 14]
 motion  liftingsi etia owlu darhi Tbes it le.tl detiagargniaepewoulain d agn an" awlaylneut dvecr aatboe th" lkeed otni dna ssoep rawet rnot eh other side. It
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[Pg 19]
[Pg 20]
vresbo low noitachhi wtyuaas c aehp .dT gnresaeshaveuld hhel witerohti ,ac samatthm Ile noli sisg vini gtia asefran constructionul-hintwe tlit lehT .lias frog inominst c suj yawefrrel dopts srortdani g own cou totheirter inrudnI snaiupe r pe tngtho tnre ,uhnastrehc anders,rapps, titirc gnitcaxets ms,erhtigre Fc.hat he saw rolle dput ehf ergithevd y erx bod anrraba leabdnt elter inissuspwho suylcioiraedr gega; rynt; rslemb-kcorf am detaoco  tacre easeragffar ,cit fot eh bustle carelessim dht e dhttaa any was hi tngtirad,revo dellor g isa lohen gs w yubinkc eapl kiot hius ht tom eopsmitol eanugnohT ercwo daw soc drifting hawk. ahs eht a fo wodriff ansbyd teghsaa te yciekerhcplach a  safe ofoT.eevel eht no ni ahe tedinjom  ,wserma dtsamethindn beng iingiecoroissiyrrp gnatodhe torn to sdnw tahcr iasla onfusioned the cthr noeathh ugrotsleam ew fo mors, cagon, muartsh roel,sp saes,sn  adeely rlntgeamelhw nse otroced a young lady fonulfruirded me a poat;he bff tdno noa ey so efro gngriteatch, elbulov a ;tseira personwho was kn ,na dg napgal pnyrsai tstmao ni teret fo aergartnmegiaomt,sb eavert Lth; nworu edam suh eht pd an, enerelavtrseb io;sa s amllup of coureurs dogsr gnit puoF oro c owdsof ieldstr c radea taltumblnd rdrived; ht nO.re taerg ewae velend ansgokcdet ehrimiapitent and erratic  sreuohs det dnaorswase he tpiy tariomens, mgroetn odei uprryls e thh ugrothy waen yzal ;ciffartrchandisds of me nht eob eebwteeacc vitierentigelladnik  ,ytevomllroe thkewag inobdna de ni debb as ailsitchit pnu g slcstr oti sml l alafcrunt d ekdaerb dela yund packet, a wao  fht eostu-hobatsid a esolc oo tate dlad pngpilspaht esa sotp oughe enunatfortoteshtegdna olc sh, p,are erghhiliolsww oliwgnb  the folnce, forzal  ylihsiff de torgrhet eaanchen lacftsi hhwcih the negro popul noital os devon .Ochmuetckpaa ci h ,hwli leww  thecallsour Mis w asthiBei e,llrahs ylpb el welhe soundand as tyas vered ei dwasspaf  opsougrala deirruh sregnevee,e les thcrosobtugna rriys uct piles on the sta sna dht ergae tk, lwog onneliipolr gnrevinab h ot eacon ther htme sfoisgnp sa rksanplg incheagdirb ehgnag gniih scsnees dott re. Oppofar asho a sonaciomraw lanortud ofe ab lccpuowo est w ohore,ffshll oe we,tnerruc eht hti wngtiifdr, tsanna diwhts boref ace he gravelypreh nom r htu,dnaow bg inifsty fltide dawpsti ,edl hee alcortr es detnesevolg ehter htoe hae Sh. und for erly aro.rH  eonti swoeny blidasedapim ndekogae na eol dndkea haith er wdei utfffes criherd oostr neoo sh was eh nahttceedurer hha ts.nklg e evo dnamrumyes, she took thna dimcsihveuoesedisra, ghhiis hae morf rae ot ran, tlemninggrine dlT ehg nereyl ehtrohs euc dnahegtes rat winchhtelssylah trbaeo, somew could d skeehc denedderh it ww,nod an;  otilat edtnniicedy  comuickt, qesora toyltfiws tho nt ianr aie rcbiddses ohdea rc art as whs hi eloydoblof ewolitd an; qud keic rhtnai  tatek sto tell it he waaliv rhe Ts.oucr ,drawrof tneb ,nd or haothehis h danu,dgeor nhtay wn  io  tvegih ro evauh a yrrdislocathis arm irhg tofde .iH snce,bala as  andra yevsrih sfo ftero ged ilyuesqehto ehtlwarps rvictor of the li nht eudts ,ht e tup ghevelole, elttlit cipt dekrwse s aema  easchthd muidges brorg eht ot kcab edchars hi, ertlacll ynas raodin grinnedund. Tomihdeda s kreknaywi s jftwid  ath ytievb ceite ffess.tednxpecsunewop saw ylno tonlyubdot bul fuer etoeh rsro  fhtp which in a gridepseht evolarg, fnggeinhr ttius han hisurnid, t prfgnu ehg mot ncrefeerd teace cinavlagdna ylla surprise at thi snuxeeptcdei tnerngeas rlgeouy rtsthcteT.des'modilus wat ules rehT .noitom eht intoght  wei andgnhttserh sia llrothngwis r'm ar ehtehtorut  denlbow, heis own eni gfoh ned orpptiw ,nehddus a h ahe tof tnd armti htnw ertsht efect pergnme aliih fir s lavotni ast fndeaor ormgithnedet ehw ir He swiftly straot tats  sawuoba tto dhe impint udtshwneri tna dped forw Tom leaolg reh deppordyupg inckpin  ivena dtr ss ikh rerse s horvoua neak ma e icqudek isica not dnof ollow it instantl,yt ehy uognl das,erngseea hnd adal yliveorgenneaughs. C a jt indnf maa  dotroecer side  the othwrra dnobdne tofowbrfin les , anesroih ,t foh ehlothpt cscriondenin es drdseam nann ioanmpcon caixeM sih tfel se eiwhtht etoeh.rhed for the glov ot sargti p a ,s  A whe aasutbodiel erb hnow ti Graard.g thspin yltfiwscaer dna, ndhae t en bheelev,et odnwht e walked ely, andp detilo,sgnwob  fislieemao  hskw rehTyera . eerp thng uingim broT dna ,mih gniwlool fanicex Mhech giving his imoe nht eobta ,aed te tby bhetlusuq elkcies yaraphis for ort comf senitnora yecsshe tton rapare p etaidemoitnettasthi wle tof whe dewt ybf saollohevoyageduring t dlbsa tA.s cenothd teif lits  aaegats gnidnal eof ting roanhe girkcd reertaehg eluani ddna eht as pngses eronaldns uwgni  tbaaord; lines were hellac dnim tsaldes mtenutos gesa ear ghtawevli seir d thus aadiesucca nam a ot souciviy lliaecsp,lo siottop -ehsingl a sd totomeegnia ,r delrreD-blereara r ubdoni gamttn  oikllThat wast best." "y.tliemat n'Doias ",reuq moT dmaken't both us  toseki  dod ,na at,gendlot edc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