Correspondence & Conversations of Alexis de Tocqueville with Nassau William Senior from 1834 to 1859, Volume 2
350 Pages
English
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Correspondence & Conversations of Alexis de Tocqueville with Nassau William Senior from 1834 to 1859, Volume 2

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350 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Correspondence & Conversations of Alexis de Tocqueville with Nassau William Seniorfrom 1834 to 1859, Vol. 2, by Alexis de TocquevilleThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: Correspondence & Conversations of Alexis de Tocqueville with Nassau William Senior from 1834 to 1859, Vol. 2Author: Alexis de TocquevilleRelease Date: August 30, 2004 [EBook #13333]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TOCQUEVILLE, VOL 2 ***Produced by G. Graustein and PG Distributed Proofreaders. Produced from images provided by the Million BookProject.CORRESPONDENCE & CONVERSATIONS OF ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLEWITH NASSAU WILLIAM SENIORFROM 1834 TO 1859EDITED BYM.C.M. SIMPSONIN TWO VOLUMES VOLUME IILONDON: HENRY S. KING & Co., 65 CORNHILL 1872* * * * *CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUMEJournal 1851-2.The army master of FranceComparison with the 18th BrumaireAggressive acts of the PresidentCoup d'État planned for March 1852Socialism leads to despotismWar necessary to maintain Louis NapoleonState prisoners on December 2Louis Napoleon's devotion to the PopeLatent Bonapartism of the FrenchPresident's reception at Notre DameFrank hypocritesMischievous public menExtradition of KossuthJanuary 29, 1849Stunner's account of ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Correspondence
& Conversations of Alexis de Tocqueville with
Nassau William Senior from 1834 to 1859, Vol. 2,
by Alexis de Tocqueville
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Correspondence & Conversations of Alexis
de Tocqueville with Nassau William Senior from
1834 to 1859, Vol. 2
Author: Alexis de Tocqueville
Release Date: August 30, 2004 [EBook #13333]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK TOCQUEVILLE, VOL 2 ***
Produced by G. Graustein and PG Distributed
Proofreaders. Produced from images provided by
the Million Book Project.CORRESPONDENCE & CONVERSATIONS OF
ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE
WITH NASSAU WILLIAM SENIOR
FROM 1834 TO 1859
EDITED BY
M.C.M. SIMPSON
IN TWO VOLUMES VOLUME II
LONDON: HENRY S. KING & Co., 65 CORNHILL
1872
* * * * *
CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME
Journal 1851-2.
The army master of France
Comparison with the 18th Brumaire
Aggressive acts of the President
Coup d'État planned for March 1852Socialism leads to despotism
War necessary to maintain Louis Napoleon
State prisoners on December 2
Louis Napoleon's devotion to the Pope
Latent Bonapartism of the French
President's reception at Notre Dame
Frank hypocrites
Mischievous public men
Extradition of Kossuth
January 29, 1849
Stunner's account of it contradicted
The Second Napoleon a copy of the First
Relies on Russian support
Compulsory voting
Life of a cavalry officer
Victims of the Coup d'État
Letters in 1852-3.
Effect of the Orleans confiscation on the English
Firmness of Prussia
Mr. Greg's writings
Communication from Schwartzenberg
New Reform Bill
Democracy or aristocracy
Reform Bill not wanted
Twenty-five thousand men at Cherbourg
Easier to understand Lord Derby than Lord John
Preparations at Cherbourg a delusion
Conversation with King Leopold
No symptoms of aristocratic re-action in England
England's democratic tendencies
Idleness of young aristocratsDeath of Protection
Revolutions leading to masquerades
Tory reforms
Imperial marriage
New Reform Bill a blunder
Journal in 1853.
Prosperity in Paris
Dangers incurred by overbuilding
Discharged workmen effect Revolutions
Probable monetary panic
Empire can be firmly established only by a
successful war
Agents undermining the Empire
Violence and corruption of the Government
Growing unpopularity of Louis Napoleon
Consequences of his death
He probably will try the resource of war
Conquest would establish his power
War must produce humiliation or slavery to France
Corruption is destroying the army and navy
Emperor cannot tolerate opposition
Will try a plebiscite
Letters in 1853.
Blackstone a mere lawyer
Feudal institutions in France and England
Gentleman and Gentilhomme
Life of seclusion
Interference of police with letters
Mrs. Crete's conversations at St. Cyr
Great writers of the eighteenth centuryPolitical torpor unfavourable to intellectual product
English not fond of generalities
Curious archives at Tours
Frightful picture they present
Sufficient to account for the Revolution of 1789
La Marck's memoir of Mirabeau
Court would not trust Mirabeau
The elder Mirabeau influenced by Revolution
Revolution could not have been averted
Works of David Hume
Effect of intolerance of the press
Honesty and shortsightedness of La Fayette
Laws must be originated by philosophers
Carried into effect by practical men
Napoleon carried out laws
Too fond of centralisation
Country life destroyed by it
Royer Collard
Danton
Madame Tallien
Tocqueville independent of society
Studious and regular life
Influence of writers as compared with active
politicians
Journal in 1854.
Criticism of the Journals
The speakers generally recognised
Aware that they were being reported
The Legitimists
Necessity of Crimean War
Probable management of it
English view of the FusionBourbons desire Constitutional Government
Socialists would prefer the Empire
They rejoiced in the Orleans confiscation
Empire might be secured by liberal institutions
Policy of G.
English new Reform Bill
Dangers of universal suffrage
Baraguay d'Hilliers and Randon
Lent in the Provinces
Chenonceaux
Montalembert's speech
Cinq Mars
Appearance of prosperity
Petite culture in Touraine
Tyranny more mischievous than civil war
Centralisation of Louis XIV. a means of taxation
Under Louis Napoleon, centralisation more
powerful than ever
Power of the Préfet
Courts of Law tools of the Executive
Préfet's candidate must succeed
Empire could not sustain a defeat
Loss of aristocracy in France
Napoleon estranged Legitimists by the murder of
the Duc d'Enghien
Louis Philippe attempted to govern through the
middle classes
Temporary restoration of aristocratic power under
the republic
Overthrown by the second Empire
Legitimists inferior to their ancestors
Dulness of modern society and books
Effects of competitionLetters in 1854-5.
Tocqueville attends the Academy
Proposed visit to Germany
Return to France
English adulation of Louis Napoleon
Mismanagement of Crimean War
Continental disparagement of England
Necessity for a conscription in England
Disastrous effects of the war for English
aristocracy
Peace premature
Journals in 1855.
Effects of the Emperor going to the Crimea
Prince Napoleon
Discontent in England
Disparagement of England
Austria alone profited by Crimean War
Despotism of Louis Napoleon consolidated by it
Centralisation in Algeria
Criticism of Mr. Senior's Article
Places Louis Napoleon too high
English alliances not dependent on the Empire
Louis Napoleon will covet the Rhine
Childish admiration of Emperor by British public
Real friends of England are the friends of her
institutions
Extracts from Mr. Senior's Article.
Description of political parties
ImperialistsLegitimists
Orleanists
Orleanist-Fusionists form the bulk of the Royalists
Legitimists unfit for public life
Republican party not to be despised
Parliamentarians
Desire only free institutions
No public opinion expressed in the Provinces
Power of Centralisation
Increased under Louis Philippe
Power of the Préfet
Foreign policy of Louis Napoleon
Of former French Sovereigns
Invasion of Rome prepared in 1847
Eastern question, a legacy from Louis Philippe
Fault as an administrator
Mismanagement of the war
His Ministers mere clerks
Free institutions may secure his throne
English Alliance
Russian influence
Revolutions followed by despotism
Lessons taught by history
Letters in 1855-6.
Tocqueville burns his letter
Conversation of May 28
Amusing letters from the Army
Enjoyment of home
Fall of Sebastopol
Cost of the war
Russia dangerous to EuropeHow to restrain her
Progress in the East
No public excitement in France
Journal in 1856.
The 'Ancien Régime'
Master of Paris, Master of France
Opposition to Suez Canal
Mischievous effect of English Opposition
Expenditure under the Empire
Effect of Opposition to the Suez Canal
Tripartite Treaty
'Friponnerie' of the Government
Tripartite Treaty
Suez Canal
French floating batteries
Fortifications of Malta
Emperor's orders to Canrobert
A campaign must be managed on the spot
Letters in 1856-7.
The 'Ancien Régime' King 'Bomba' American
Rebellion Lord Aberdeen on the Crimean War
Eccentricities of English public men Remedy for
rise in house-rent The rise produced by excessive
public works Dulness of Paris Mr. Senior's Journal
in Egypt Chinese war
Journal in 1857.