Devereux — Volume 05
22 Pages
English
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Devereux — Volume 05

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22 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook Devereux, by Bulwer-Lytton, Book V. #56 in our series by Edward Bulwer-LyttonCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloadingor redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do notchange or edit the header without written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of thisfile. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can alsofind out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts****EBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971*******These EBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers*****Title: Devereux, Book V.Author: Edward Bulwer-LyttonRelease Date: March 2005 [EBook #7628] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was firstposted on February 25, 2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK DEVEREUX, BY LYTTON, BOOK V. ***This eBook was produced by Dagny, dagnypg@yahoo.com and David Widger, widger@cecomet.netBOOK V.CHAPTER I.A PORTRAIT.MYSTERIOUS impulse at the heart, which never suffers us to be at rest, which urges us onward as ...

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*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK DEVEREUX, BY LYTTON, BOOK V. ***
This eBook was produced by Dagny, dagnypg@yahoo.com and David Widger, widger@cecomet.net
**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts** **EBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971** *****These EBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers*****
Title: Devereux, Book V. Author: Edward Bulwer-Lytton Release Date: March 2005 [EBook #7628] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on February 25, 2003] Edition: 10 Language: English
 an accident to aetufilue evingnreI mbme oer bneoon tern smain a r a nof efahwlo medonsiurjosoy irrac ymacco egaloel,da  dews rtisit; anwith a vderu em  eruonoh Te. Chevillagllastnlpiacsmo tawrieshe pt. Tamleh eht otni ,tsapret ghli s aerftou"Yt.gha e av htsac sihuoht fo  I aere:t felmosimgnhcraenh s ec s a tinleo e ava lefi s ti erewere, indeed, in tis  oosno".eWw  ta tops gnirull and antsaeapla esvr sbot ihssdeddre I atimethe il AelttuC d .erhe too gioatton c poest rfmot ehemerged  rivuletei t ,uqnaennim nd nr, all iot i demrofn sih rofe urscobn ioatstna dcsnayto pprotunities of knowgdelh ;eid etondee s hm,evow, erhe vss tosseto psic foh ti yvica wut bn,meryntoucnalem rehtar sa pensiveholy andyli  nih ,on tnon io cofxpsessre ,ec tubtnuonane andlente sio thylt lswoso esyr neimchw fes itm orfekoms eht dnae rear, le in th s ailttllga eawTh. vie  sleneceeht ohw ammodednp rutr,hhtmefi y fum thef eaes ossorg ehdna sseninpryshe tomfrg w ihhc ,htuohgt he human wishes,ohw  yllilnut ekee dskp s,ieot nneerg egalliv ehernt iith icwh, omer h aw tiedkcuretverding  livb gnaeneid dilpmt,eeo  t oth furtf ,na d oht eelkling anran spararitol stneschy ,eert-tuc hcihw as l I wng aeanitsnaagnia dno dloudists amreWe. dah uap ,desdna sected with a widnni gon rnuemolchhihe ts ll wono niih fa deahc  pouring slowly,us naskna tumu nBe. lfseitd oodhlihc enog ruo foetch strnse,expaaf rht e ,nioferg revo sfo spuorel yts iambew lo
Tacitus. *
CHAPTER I. A PORTRAIT. MYSTERIOUS impulse at the heart, which never suffers us to be at rest, which urges us onward as by an unseen yet irresistible law—human planets in a petty orbit, hurried forever and forever, till our course is run and our light is quenched —through the circle of a dark and impenetrable destiny! art thou not some faint forecast and type of our wanderings hereafter; of the unslumbering nature of the soul; of the everlasting progress which we are predoomed to make through the countless steps and realms and harmonies in the infinite creation? Oh, often in my rovings have I dared to dream so, —often have I soared on the wild wings of thought above the "smoke and stir" of this dim earth, and wrought, from the restless visions of my mind, a chart of the glories and the wonders which the released spirit may hereafter visit and behold! What a glad awakening from self,—what a sparkling and fresh draught from a new source of being,—what a wheel within wheel, animating, impelling, arousing all the rest of this animal machine, is the first excitement of Travel! the first free escape from the bonds of the linked and tame life of cities and social vices,—the jaded pleasure and the hollow love, the monotonous round of sordid objects and dull desires,—the eternal chain that binds us to things and beings, mockeries of ourselves, alike, but oh, how different! the shock that brings us nearer to men only to make us strive against them, and learn, from the harsh contest of veiled deceit and open force, that the more we share the aims of others, the more deeply and basely rooted we grow to the littleness of self! I passed more lingeringly through France than I did through the other portions of my route. I had dwelt long enough in the capital to be anxious to survey the country. It was then that the last scale which the magic of Louis Quatorze and the memory of his gorgeous court had left upon the mortal eye fell off, and I saw the real essence of that monarch's greatness and the true relics of his reign. I saw the poor, and the degraded, and the racked, and the priest-ridden, tillers and peoplers of the soil, which made the substance beneath the glittering and false surface,—the body of that vast empire, of which I had hitherto beheld only the face, and THAT darkly, and for the most part covered by a mask! No man can look upon France, beautiful France,—her rich soil, her temperate yet maturing clime, the gallant and bold spirits which she produces, her boundaries so indicated and protected by Nature itself, her advantages of ocean and land, of commerce and agriculture,—and not wonder that her prosperity should be so bloated, and her real state so wretched and diseased. Let England draw the moral, and beware not only of wars which exhaust, but of governments which impoverish. A waste of the public wealth is the most lasting of public afflictions; and "the treasury which is drained by extravagance must be refilled by crime."*
BOOK V.
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This reflection, if true, may console us for the loss of those village dances and pleasant holidays for which "merry * England" was once celebrated. The loss of them has been ascribed to the gloomy influence of the Puritans; but it has never occurred to the good poets, who have so mourned over that loss, that it is also to be ascribed to the /liberty/ which those Puritans /generalized/, if they did not introduce.—ED.
y few areres; andules shwt ehr ceratgfitiaro noe ni eeretb deht y, orhersf otst oliilu wna erw oht  irdwareo  tngoht gnillacer ybt) floatouderjesls ynoo dej youoghaund a tth lhefo el a eht not et whamlthe  of a m ilgnniahre eat fhe Ts.ar eursnortam dna srehoh moytu'h spsrotsare dear, and  eret foy ehgnuoan, thd e os wtohc( w iha dnveren bl anod wiendenad erew ot gnicrrmee thc,simuy a,nep dneht erg y tlerovd,rear p ecstaetu ,sw reval fromme interw remrof ehT .evro glettlia f  oahedehs htt neaeed bthery gaartl aetulivsot  and edis etr eht fon thh, oposie opastnpaehwciyr ,atwh: re awee erraeb lliw htrim n inse a clo tooeu ,"?rTitnopscerkma tedr,Sire" a ,th dnp ehseir."Yet," e sighed dumisgn Ierusem" ;eruC si erehtnkla p an owhr tt ehvoreluter viittl a lwerde lo.nwooN""s "! dia "I,rhpes apeytha ers ee notb teter advantage whihhcevws colsuithe rer t otheachc rieht gnoma yervsut ghmiy he trud ar w toMsnei"Will nohildren.diaseht recn "?stho dae arne terh thneatees,e truqeiro e yeb tojvegay ildeen t ani I dnaratnulovtheir converse ber rnietertst  oo  tncsaontio  tus ysopp gnimeht of ivaleam?a drm suw yhb  e tti Ae!hur isy whh,ylno ti ver eht ender and the blsu hfoa m leolewliwit ghs hademaeht gis om ht er nah eus nhtw ehhe tnd tt, as seg lliw hcihw sevllti seretwewsroahnust ; selfa yrural loand the tratgnilguals ,h iyrhin he tat s eht dna tnayoubinurrmmu, llrig do ,eesnht ena dnsetn sue gr, th gnit nia ehmututry s eel alowgladcn,et ehg olsse flute and the the ars amre danidacrA ruo fo laevivt ar whaeem!yes  ohtypd h pat,yeow hioan "n, ym pmocaht ot no myselfrather t Ipsko eyl ,na ddiinduvis,alo  sef Ii rasi tton  the happiest naitno,st ahatert aty nv ema its ixe denigecnarebut as. Buis n it ehh tot se tpaipht sa naeef gnil tin hheel bf ieo  fuo rpaipenssy, andanpeasantrhw ot tsrifeht ;e  wnece she tom srfyei usvron wtherth ot wiaugheicr eebenta hht "who seems to pG ruillaag cyteythe  vinl ei oof eif ehttsarsr toil?nd tu ar""Yot dias ",eruC eh h Ierngt,mee avt in a dting-spoerner sese ,htgevara aild oa tofol dr gnraerna ynd wur alabo of vrlanieta  nnoylavslf  oiaalrntuas feirb eht ,eo