Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 18: September/October 1662
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Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 18: September/October 1662

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Diary of Samuel Pepys, September/October 1662, by Samuel PepysThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: Diary of Samuel Pepys, September/October 1662Author: Samuel PepysRelease Date: November 30, 2004 [EBook #4136]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS, ***Produced by David WidgerTHE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A. F.R.S.CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTYTRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE REV. MYNORS BRIGHTM.A. LATE FELLOW AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE(Unabridged)WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTESEDITED WITH ADDITIONS BYHENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A. DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS. SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER 1662September 1st. Up betimes at my lodging and to my office and among my workmen, and then with Sir W. Batten and SirW. Pen by coach to St. James's, this being the first day of our meeting there by the Duke's order; but when we come, wefound him going out by coach with his Duchess, and he told us he was to go abroad with the Queen to-day (to Durdans, itseems, to dine with my Lord Barkeley, where I have been very merry when I was a ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Diary of Samuel
Pepys, September/October 1662, by Samuel
Pepys
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Diary of Samuel Pepys, September/October
1662
Author: Samuel Pepys
Release Date: November 30, 2004 [EBook #4136]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS, ***
Produced by David Widger
THE DIARY OF
SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.
F.R.S.
CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO
THE ADMIRALTY
TRANSCRIBED FROM THE SHORTHAND
MANUSCRIPT IN THE PEPYSIAN LIBRARY
MAGDALENE COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE BY THE
REV. MYNORS BRIGHT M.A. LATE FELLOW
AND PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE
(Unabridged)
WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE'S NOTES
EDITED WITH ADDITIONS BY
HENRY B. WHEATLEY F.S.A.
DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS.
SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER
1662
September 1st. Up betimes at my lodging and to
my office and among my workmen, and then with
Sir W. Batten and Sir W. Pen by coach to St.
James's, this being the first day of our meeting
there by the Duke's order; but when we come, we
found him going out by coach with his Duchess,
and he told us he was to go abroad with the Queen
to-day (to Durdans, it seems, to dine with my Lord
Barkeley, where I have been very merry when I
was a little boy); so we went and staid a little at Mr.
Coventry's chamber, and I to my Lord Sandwich's,
who is gone to wait upon the King and Queen
today. And so Mr. Paget being there, Will Howe
and I and he played over some things of Locke's
that we used to play at sea, that pleased us three
well, it being the first music I have heard a great
while, so much has my business of late taken me
off from all my former delights. By and by by water
home, and there dined alone, and after dinner with
my brother Tom's two men I removed all my goods
out of Sir W. Pen's house into one room that I
have with much ado got ready at my house, and so
I am to be quit of any further obligation to him. So
to my office, but missing my key, which I had in my
hand just now, makes me very angry and out of
order, it being a thing that I hate in others, and
more in myself, to be careless of keys, I thinking
another not fit to be trusted that leaves a key
behind their hole. One thing more vexes me: my
wife writes me from the country that her boy plays
the rogue there, and she is weary of him, and
complains also of her maid Sarah, of which I am
also very sorry. Being thus out of temper, I could
do little at my office, but went home and eat a bit,
and so to my lodging to bed.
2nd. Up betimes and got myself ready alone, and
so to my office, my mind much troubled for my key
that I lost yesterday, and so to my workmen and
put them in order, and so to my office, and we met
all the morning, and then dined at Sir W. Batten's
with Sir W. Pen, and so to my office again all the
afternoon, and in the evening wrote a letter to Mr.
Cooke, in the country, in behalf of my brother Tom,
to his mistress, it being the first of my appearing in
it, and if she be as Tom sets her out, it may be
very well for him. So home and eat a bit, and so to
my lodging to bed.
3rd. Up betimes, but now the days begin to
shorten, and so whereas I used to rise by four
o'clock, it is not broad daylight now till after five
o'clock, so that it is after five before I do rise. To
my office, and about 8 o'clock I went over to
Redriffe, and walked to Deptford, where I found
Mr. Coventry and Sir W. Pen beginning the pay, it
being my desire to be there to-day because it is
the first pay that Mr. Coventry has been at, and I
would be thought to be as much with Mr. Coventry
as I can. Here we staid till noon, and by that time
paid off the Breda, and then to dinner at the
tavern, where I have obtained that our commons is
not so large as they used to be, which I am glad to
see. After dinner by water to the office, and there
we met and sold the Weymouth, Successe, and
Fellowship hulkes, where pleasant to see how
backward men are at first to bid; and yet when the
candle is going out, how they bawl and dispute
afterwards who bid the most first. And here I
observed one man cunninger than the rest that
was sure to bid the last man, and to carry it; and
inquiring the reason, he told me that just as the
flame goes out the smoke descends, which is a
thing I never observed before, and by that he do
know the instant when to bid last, which is very
pretty. In our discourse in the boat Mr. Coventry
told us how the Fanatiques and the Presbyters,
that did intend to rise about this time, did choose
this day as the most auspicious to them in their
endeavours against monarchy: it being fatal twice
to the King, and the day of Oliver's death.
[Cromwell had considered the 3rd of
September as the most fortunate day of his
life, on account of his victories at Dunbar and
Worcester. It was also remarkable for the
great storm that occurred at the time of his
death; and as being the day on which the
Fire of London, in 1666, burnt with the
greatest fury.—B.]
But, blessed be God! all is likely to be quiet, I hope.
After the sale I walked to my brother's, in my way
meeting with Dr. Fairbrother, of whom I enquired
what news in Church matters. He tells me, what I
heard confirmed since, that it was fully resolved by
the King's new Council that an indulgence should
be granted the Presbyters; but upon the Bishop of
London's speech
[Gilbert Sheldon, born July 19th, 1598;
Fellow of All Souls, Oxford, 1622; Warden,
1635; Bishop of London, 1660-63;
Archbishop of Canterbury, 1663. Died
November 9th, 1677.]
(who is now one of the most powerful men in
England with the King), their minds were wholly
turned. And it is said that my Lord Albemarle did
oppose him most; but that I do believe is only in
appearance. He told me also that most of the
Presbyters now begin to wish they had complied,
now they see that no Indulgence will be granted
them, which they hoped for; and that the Bishop of
London hath taken good care that places are
supplied with very good and able men, which is the
only thing that will keep all quiet. I took him in the
tavern at Puddle dock, but neither he nor I drank
any of the wine we called for, but left it, and so
after discourse parted, and Mr. Townsend not
being at home I went to my brother's, and there
heard how his love matter proceeded, which do not
displease me, and so by water to White Hall to my
Lord's lodgings, where he being to go to
Hinchingbroke to-morrow morning, I staid and
fiddled with Will. Howe some new tunes very
pleasant, and then my Lord came in and had much
kind talk with him, and then to bed with Mr. Moore
there alone. So having taken my leave of my Lord
before I went to bed, I resolved to rise early and be
gone without more speaking to him—
4th. Which I did, and by water betimes to the
Tower and so home, where I shifted myself, being
to dine abroad, and so being also trimmed, which
is a thing I have very seldom done of late, I gat to
my office and then met and sit all the morning, and
at noon we all to the Trinity House, where we
treated, very dearly, I believe, the officers of the
Ordnance; where was Sir W. Compton and the rest
and the Lieutenant of the Tower. We had much
and good music, which was my best entertainment.
Sir Wm. Compton I heard talk with great pleasure
of the difference between the fleet now and in
Queen Elisabeth's days; where, in 88, she had but
36 sail great and small, in the world; and ten
rounds of powder was their allowance at that time
against the Spaniard. After Sir W. Compton and
Mr. Coventry, and some of the best of the rest
were gone, I grew weary of staying with Sir
Williams both, and the more for that my Lady
Batten and her crew, at least half a score, come
into the room, and I believe we shall pay size for it;
but 'tis very pleasant to see her in her hair under
her hood, and how by little and little she would fain
be a gallant; but, Lord! the company she keeps
about her are like herself, that she may be known
by them what she is. Being quite weary I stole from
them and to my office, where I did business till 9 at
night, and so to my lodgings to bed.
5th. Up by break of day at 5 o'clock, and down by
water to Woolwich: in my way saw the yacht lately
built by our virtuosoes (my Lord Brunkard and
others, with the help of Commissioner Pett also)
set out from Greenwich with the little Dutch bezan,
to try for mastery; and before they got to Woolwich
the Dutch beat them half-a-mile (and I hear this
afternoon, that, in coming home, it got above three
miles); which all our people are glad of. Here I staid
and mustered the yard and looked into the
storehouses; and so walked all alone to
Greenwich, and thence by water to Deptford, and
there examined some stores, and did some of my
own business in hastening my work there, and so
walked to Redriffe, being by this time pretty weary
and all in a sweat; took boat there for the Tower,
which made me a little fearful, it being a cold,
windy morning. So to my lodgings and there
rubbed myself clean, and so to Mr. Bland's, the
merchant, by invitation, I alone of all our company
of this office; where I found all the officers of the
Customs, very grave fine gentlemen, and I am
very glad to know them; viz.—Sir Job Harvy, Sir
John Wolstenholme, Sir John Jacob, Sir Nicholas
Crisp, Sir John Harrison, and Sir John Shaw: very
good company. And among other pretty discourse,
some was of Sir Jerom Bowes, Embassador from
Queene Elizabeth to the Emperor of Russia;
[In 1583; the object of his mission being to
persuade the Muscovite (Ivan IV. the
Terrible) to a peace with John, King of
Sweden. He was also employed to confirm
the trade of the English with Russia, and
having incurred some personal danger, was
received with favour on his return by the
Queen. He died in 1616.]
who, because some of the noblemen there would
go up the stairs to the Emperor before him, he
would not go up till the Emperor had ordered those
two men to be dragged down stairs, with their
heads knocking upon every stair till they were
killed. And when he was come up, they demanded
his sword of him before he entered the room. He
told them, if they would have his sword, they
should have his boots too. And so caused his
boots to be pulled off, and his night-gown and
night-cap and slippers to be sent for; and made the
Emperor stay till he could go in his night-dress,
since he might not go as a soldier. And lastly, when
the Emperor in contempt, to show his command of
his subjects, did command one to leap from the
window down and broke his neck in the sight of our
Embassador, he replied that his mistress did set
more by, and did make better use of the necks of
her subjects but said that, to show what her
subjects would do for her, he would, and did, fling
down his gantlett before the Emperor; and
challenged all the nobility there to take it up, in
defence of the Emperor against his Queen: for
which, at this very day, the name of Sir Jerom
Bowes is famous and honoured there. After dinner
I came home and found Sir John Minnes come this
day, and I went to him to Sir W. Batten's, where it
pleased me to see how jealous Sir Williams both
are of my going down to Woolwich, &c., and doing
my duty as I nowadays do, and of my dining with
the Commission of the Customs. So to my office,
and there till 9 at night, and so to my lodgings to
bed. I this day heard that Mr. Martin Noell is
knighted by the King, which I much wonder at; but
yet he is certainly a very useful man.
6th. Lay long, that is, till 6 and past before I rose,
in order to sweat a little away the cold which I was
afraid I might have got yesterday, but I bless God I
am well. So up and to my office, and then we met
and sat till noon, very full of business. Then Sir
John Minnes, both Sir Williams and I to the Trinity
House, where we had at dinner a couple of venison
pasties, of which I eat but little, being almost
cloyed, having been at five pasties in three days,
namely, two at our own feast, and one yesterday,
and two to-day. So home and at the office all the
afternoon, busy till nine at night, and so to my
lodging and to bed. This afternoon I had my new
key and the lock of my office door altered, having
lost my key the other day, which vexed me.
7th (Lord's day). Up betimes and round about by
the streets to my office, and walked in the garden
and in my office till my man Will rose, and then
sent to tell Sir J. Minnes that I would go with him to
Whitehall, which anon we did, in his coach, and to
the Chapell, where I heard a good sermon of the
Dean of Ely's, upon returning to the old ways, and
a most excellent anthem, with symphonys
between, sung by Captain Cooke. Then home with
Mr. Fox and his lady; and there dined with them,
where much company come to them. Most of our
discourse was what ministers are flung out that will
not conform: and the care of the Bishop of London
that we are here supplied with very good men.
Thence to my Lord's, where nobody at home but a
woman that let me in, and Sarah above, whither I
went up to her and played and talked with her . . .
After I had talked an hour or two with her I went
and gave Mr. Hunt a short visit, he being at home
alone, and thence walked homewards, and
meeting Mr. Pierce, the chyrurgeon, he took me
into Somersett House; and there carried me into