Dick Sands, the Boy Captain
110 Pages
English
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Dick Sands, the Boy Captain

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110 Pages
English

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Published 08 December 2010
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Language English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Dick Sands the Boy Captain, by Jules Verne Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloading or redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook. This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do not change or edit the header without written permission. Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can also find out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved. **Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts** **eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971** *****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!***** Title: Dick Sands the Boy Captain Author: Jules Verne Release Date: October, 2005 [EBook #9150] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on September 8, 2003] Edition: 10 Language: English Character set encoding: UTF-8 *** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK DICK SANDS THE BOY CAPTAIN *** Produced by Distributed Proofreaders Dick Sands the Boy Captain by Jules Verne [Redactor’s Note: Dick Sands the Boy Captain (Number V018 in the T&M numerical listing of Verne’s works is a translation of Un capitaine de quinze ans (1878) by Ellen E. Frewer who also translated other Verne works. The current translation was published by Sampson & Low in England (1878) and Scribners in New York (1879) and was republished many times and included in Volume 8 of the Parke edition of The Works of Jules Verne (1911). There is another translation published by George Munro (1878) in New York with the title Dick Sand A Captain at Fifteen. This work has an almost mechanical repetiveness in the continuing description of the day after day trials of sailing at sea. Thus the illustrations, of which there were 94 in the french edition, are all the more important in keeping up the reader’s interest. The titles of the illustrations are given here as a prelude to a future fully illustrated edition.] DICK SANDS THE BOY CAPTAIN. BY JULES VERNE. TRANSLATED BY ELLEN E. FREWER ILLUSTRATED 1879 CONTENTS. PART THE FIRST THE “PILGRIM” THE APPRENTICE A RESCUE THE SURVIVORS OF THE “WALDECK” DINGO’S SAGACITY A WHALE IN SIGHT PREPARATIONS FOR AN ATTACK A CATASTROPHE DICK’S PROMOTION THE NEW CREW ROUGH WEATHER LAND AT LAST ASHORE A STRANGER THROUGH THE FOREST MISGIVINGS A TERRIBLE DISCOVERY PART THE SECOND THE DARK CONTINENT ACCOMPLICES ON THE MARCH AGAIN ROUGH TRAVELLING WHITE ANTS A DIVING-BELL A SLAVE CARAVAN NOTES BY THE WAY KAZONDÉ MARKET-DAY A BOWL OF PUNCH ROYAL OBSEQUIES IN CAPTIVITY A RAY OF HOPE AN EXCITING CHASE A MAGICIAN DRIFTING DOWN THE STREAM AN ANXIOUS VOYAGE AN ATTACK A HAPPY REUNION. I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIV. XV. XVI. XVII. XVIII. I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. XVII. XVIII. XIX. XX. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Number I-01-a I-01-b I-02-a I-02-b I-03-a I-03-b Title Cousin Benedict Captain Hull advanced to meet Mrs. Weldon and her party Negoro Dick and Little Jack Negoro had approached without being noticed by any one The dog began to swim slowly and with manifest weakness towards the boat I-04-a I-04-b I-05-a I-05-b I-05-c I-06-a I-06-b I-06-c I-07-a I-07-b I-08-a I-08-b I-08-c I-09-a I-09-b I-10-a I-10-b I-10-c I-11-a I-12-a I-12-b I-12-c I-13-a I-13-b I-13-c I-14-a I-14-b I-14-c I-15-a I-15-b I-15-c I-16-a I-16-b I-16-c I-16-d I-17-a I-17-b I-17-c I-18-a I-18-b II-02-a II-02-b II-02-c II-03-a II-03-b II-03-c II-04-a II-04-b II-04-c II-05-a II-05-b II-05-c II-06-a II-06-b II-06-c II-07-a II-08-a II-08-b Mrs. Weldon assisted by Nan and the ever active Dick Sands, was doing everything in her power to restore consciousness to the poor sufferers The good-natured negroes were ever ready to lend a helping hand “There you are, then, Master Jack!” Jack cried out in the greatest excitement that Dingo knew how to read Negoro, with a threatening gesture that seemed half involuntary, withdrew immediately to his accustomed quarters “This Dingo is nothing out of the way” Occasionally Dick Sands would take a pistol, and now and then a rifle “What a big fellow!” The captain’s voice came from the retreating boat “I must get you to keep your eye upon that man” The whale seemed utterly unconscious of the attack that was threatening it The boat was well-nigh full of water, and in imminent danger of being capsized There is no hope “Oh, we shall soon be on shore!” “Oh yes, Jack; you shall keep the wind in order” All three of them fell flat upon the deck Jack evidenced his satisfaction by giving his huge friend a hearty shake of the hand A light shadow glided stealthily along the deck For half an hour Negoro stood motionless Under bare poles Quick as lightning, Dick Sands drew a revolver from his pocket “There! look there!” “You have acquitted yourself like a man” They both examined the outspread chart The sea was furious, and dashed vehemently upon the crags on either hand Surveying the shore with the air of a man who was trying to recall some past experience Not without emotion could Mrs. Weldon, or indeed any of them, behold the unfortunate ship The entomologist was seen making his way down the face of the cliff at the imminent lisk of breaking his neck “Good morning, my young friend” “He is my little son” They came to a tree to which a horse was tethered The way across the forest could scarcely be called a path Occasionally the soil became marshy A halt for the night Hercules himself was the first to keep watch “Don’t fire!” A herd of gazelles dashed past him like a glowing cloud A halt was made for the night beneath a grove of lofty trees “Look here! here are hands, men’s hands” The man was gone, and his horse with him! They were seated at the foot of an enormous banyan-tree Both men, starting to their feet, looked anxiously around them Dingo disappeared again amongst the bushes “You must keep this a secret” “Harris has left us” The march was continued with as much rapidity as was consistent with caution It was a scene only too common in Central Africa Another brilliant flash brought the camp once again into relief One after another, the whole party made their way inside Cousin Benedict’s curiosity was awakened The