Etiquette
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Etiquette

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Etiquette, by Agnes H. MortonThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.orgTitle: EtiquetteAuthor: Agnes H. MortonRelease Date: January 28, 2007 [EBook #20470]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ETIQUETTE ***Produced by Al HainesETIQUETTEBYAGNES H. MORTONAUTHOR OF"LETTER WRITING," "QUOTATIONS," &C.GOOD MANNERS FOR ALL PEOPLE, ESPECIALLY FOR THOSE "WHODWELL WITHIN THE BROAD ZONE OF THE AVERAGE"(REVISED EDITION)PHILADELPHIATHE PENN PUBLISHING COMPANY1919Copyright, 1892, By the Penn Publishing CompanyContentsINTRODUCTIONI. ETHICS OF ETIQUETTEII. VISITING CARDS THE OFFICE OF THE VISITING CARD. STYLE OF CARDS. THE ENGRAVING OF VISITING CARDS.— Cards for Men; Cards for Women; Cards for Young Women; After Marriage Cards. THE USE OF THE VISITING CARD.— Calling in Person; Card-leaving in Lieu of Personal Calls; Cases in which Personal Card-leaving is Required; Cards by Messenger or by Post; Card-leaving by Proxy. SOME FURTHER ILLUSTRATIONS OF CARD USAGE.III. CEREMONIOUS CARDS AND INVITATIONS. ETIQUETTE OF REPLIES. THE "HIGH TEA," OR MUSICALE,ETC. ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Etiquette, by Agnes H. Morton This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Etiquette Author: Agnes H. Morton Release Date: January 28, 2007 [EBook #20470] Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ETIQUETTE ***
Produced by Al Haines
ETIQUETTE
BY
AGNES H. MORTON
AUTHOR OF
"LETTER WRITING," "QUOTATIONS," &C.  
DOOGNAM WDOHW" ESOHT ROF BHE TINTHWIL ELP OEA LLF ROENSRLLY ECIA ESPPLE, EFOT EHORDAZ NO" AVERAGE
(REVISED EDITION)
III. CEREMONIOUS CARDS AND INVITATIONS. ETIQUETTE OF REPLIES. THE "HIGH TEA," OR MUSICALE, ETC. WEDDING INVITATIONS. DINNER INVITATIONS. LUNCHEON AND BREAKFAST INVITATIONS.
INTRODUCTION I. ETHICS OFETIQUETTE II. VISITINGCARDS  THE OFFICE OF THE VISITING CARD. STYLE OF CARDS.  THE ENGRAVING OF VISITING CARDS.—  Cards for Men;  Cards for Women;  Cards for Young Women;  After Marriage Cards.  THE USE OF THE VISITING CARD.—  Calling in Person;  Card-leaving in Lieu of Personal Calls;  Cases in which Personal Card-leaving is Required;  Cards by Messenger or by Post;  Card-leaving by Proxy.  SOME FURTHER ILLUSTRATIONS OF CARD USAGE.
IV. THE CONDUCT OF A CHURCH WEDDING V. ENTERTAINING VI. AFTERNOON RECEPTIONS AND TEAS VII. THEDINNER SERVICE REQUISITES FOR THE DINING-TABLE. THE FORMAL ARRANGEMENT OF THE DINNER-TABLE. THE ARRIVAL OF GUESTS, MEANWHILE. THE ANNOUNCEMENT OFDINNER. THESERVINGOFTHEDINNER. MISCELLANEOUS POINTS. DINNER-TABLETALK. INFORMAL DINNERS. VIII. LUNCHEONS IX. SUPPERS X. BREAKFASTS XI. EVENINGPARTIES XII. THETWENTIETH CENTURY
Contents
Copyright, 1892, By the Penn Publishing Company
PHILADELPHIA THEPENN PUBLISHINGCOMPANY 1919
 STRANGEII. "THEIX"ESHY TAT GIW SNIHTHT RI TA
XIX. BEHAVIOR IN PUBLIC THOROUGHFARES
XX. IN PUBLIC ASSEMBLIES
XVII. THE AMERICAN CHAPERONE
XVIII. GREETINGS. RECOGNITIONS. INTRODUCTIONS
XXIII. A FEW POINTS ON DRESS
XXIV. PERSONAL HABITS
XXI. BEARINGAND SPEECH
XXII. SELF-COMMAND
XXVII. ETIQUETTEOFGIFTS
XXVIII. GALLANTRYAND COQUETRY
XXV. SOCIAL CO-OPERATION
XXVI. ON THEWING
XXIX. IN CONCLUSION
XIV. "MAKEYOURSELFAT HOME"
XVI. SOCIAL YOUNGAMERICA
XV. "AS THETWIGIS BENT"
INTRODUCTION As a rule, books of etiquette are written from the standpoint of the ultra-fashionable circle. They give large space to the details of behavior on occasions of extreme conventionality, and describe minutely the conduct proper on state occasions. But the majority in every town and village are people of moderate means and quiet habits of living, to whom the extreme formalities of the world of fashion will always remain something of an abstraction, and the knowledge of them is not of much practical use except to the few who are reflective enough to infer their own particular rule from any illustration of the general code. Though it is interesting as a matter of information to know how a state dinner is conducted, still, as a matter of fact, the dinners usually given within this broad zone of "the average" are served without the assistance of butler, footman, or florist; innocent of wines and minus the more elaborate and expensive courses; and though servedà la Russethe service is under the watchful supervision of the hostess herself and executed by the more or less skillful hand of a demure maid-servant. Yet, in all essential points, the laws of etiquette controlling the conduct of this simple dinner of the American democrat are the same as those observed in the ceremonious banquet of the ambitious aristocrat. The degree of formality varies; the quality of courtesy is unchanging. Well-mannered people are those who are at all times thoughtfully observant oflittleproprieties Such people do not "forget their manners" when away from home. They eat at the hotel table as daintily and with as polite regard for the comfort of their nearest neighbor as though they were among critical acquaintances. They never elbow mercilessly through crowded theatre aisles, nor stand up in front of others to see the pictures of a panorama, nor allow their children to climb upon the car seats with muddy or rough-nailed shoes; nor do a score of other things that every day are to be observed in public places, the mortifying tell-tale marks of anhabitualill-manners. The importance of constant attention to points of etiquette cannot be too earnestly emphasized. The long lecture of instruction to the little Ruggles', preparatory to their visit to the Birds, is a comical—if burlesque—illustration of the emergency that sometimes faces some people, that of suddenly preparing to "behave themselves" on a great occasion. Although the little Ruggles' were fired with ambition to do themselves credit, their crude preparation was not equal to the occasion. The best of intentions could not at once take the place of established custom. One might as well hastily wrap himself in a yard or two of uncut broadcloth expecting it to be transformed, by instant miracle, into a coat. The garment must be cut and fitted, and adjusted and worn for a space of time before it can become the well-fitting habit, worn with the easy grace of unconsciousness which marks the habitually well-mannered. In this brief volume I have endeavored to suggest some of the fundamental laws of good behavior in every-day life. It is hoped that the conclusions reached, while not claiming to be either exhaustive or infallible, may be useful as far as they go. Where authorities differ as to forms I have stated the rule which has the most widespread sanction of good usage.
ETIQUETTE
ETHICS OF ETIQUETTE
Etiquette is the term applied to correct behavior in social life, and refers to the manner of actions and the expression of a proper social spirit through the medium of established forms and ceremonies. Polite usage recognizes certain minute distinctions between the mannerly and the unmannerly ways of performing every act of life that affects the comfort and happiness of others. By one whose experience in life has been a hardening process tending in the direction of a crystallized selfishness the rules of etiquette are regarded with contempt and alluded to with a sneer. No more disheartening problem faces the social reformer than the question how to overcome the bitter hostility to refined manners which marks the ignorant "lower classes." On the other hand, there is no more hopeful sign of progress in civilization than the gradual softening of these hard natures under the influence of social amenities. The secret of successful missionary work lies primarily, not in tracts, nor in dogmas, nor in exhortations, but in the subtle attraction of a refined, benevolent spirit, breathing its very self into the lives of those who have hitherto known only the rasping, grasping selfishness of their fellow-men, and to whom this new gospel of brotherly kindness and deference is a marvelous revelation and inspiration. The result of such missionary work is a triumph of sanctified courtesy, a triumph not unworthy the disciples of Him who "went about doing good" while teaching and exemplifying the "golden rule" upon which all rules of etiquette, however "worldly," are based. Perhaps it may sometimes seem that there is little relation, possibly even some antagonism, between the sincerity of perfect courtesy and the proprieties of formal etiquette. At times etiquette requires us to do things that are not agreeable to our selfish impulses, and to say things that are not literally true if our secret feelings were known. But there is no instance wherein the laws of etiquette need transgress the law of sincerity when the ultimate purpose of each action is to develop and sustain social harmony. Sometimes, for example, we invite people to visit us, and we pay visits in return, when both occasions are, on the face of it, a bore. Yet there may be good reasons why we should sacrifice any mere impulse of choice and exert ourselves to manifest a hospitable spirit toward certain people who are most uncongenial to us. Sometimes for the sake of another who is dear to us, and who, in turn, is attached to these same unattractive people, we make the third line of the triangle cheerfully, and even gladly, no matter how onerous the task, how distasteful the association forced upon us. These are not happy experiences, but they are tests of character that we are all liable to meet and which prove a most excellent discipline if they are met with discretion and patience. Moreover, in the conscientious effort to be agreeable to disagreeable people we are tacitly trying to persuade ourselves that they are not so disagreeable after all, and indeed such is our surprising discovery in many instances. Let us hope that others who exercise a similar forbearance toward ourselves are equally flattering in the conclusions which they reach. Etiquette requires that we shall treat all people with equal courtesy, given the same conditions. It has a tendency to ignore the individuality of people. We may not slight one man simply because we do not like him, nor may we publicly exhibit extreme preference for the one whom we do like. In both cases the rebel against the restraints of social mice shouts the charge of "insincerity." Well, perhaps some of the impulses of sincerity are better held in check; they are too closely allied to the humoring of our cherished prejudices. If "tact consists in knowing what not to say," etiquette consists in knowing what not to do in the direction of manifesting our impulsive likes and dislikes. Besides, etiquette is not so much a manifestationtoward othersas it is an exponent ofourselves. We are courteous to others, first of all, because such behavior only is consistent with our own claim to be well-bred. Bearing this in mind we can behave with serenity in the presence of our most aggravating foe; his worst manifestation of himself fails to provoke us to retort in kind. We treat him politely, not because he deserves it, but because we owe it to ourselves to be gentle-mannered. Etiquettebegins at self. There is no worthy deference to others that does not rest on the basis of self-respect.  "To thine own self be true;  And it must follow, as the night the day,  Thou canst not then be false to any man " .
It is a superficial judgment that descries nothing but insincerity in the unvarying suavity of a well-bred manner; that regards the conventional code of behavior as merely a device for rendering social life artificial. Theraison d'êtreis always to be found in the established rules of etiquette; and probably the most exacting and seemingly unnecessary of formalities has its foundation in some good common sense principle not far removed in spirit from "the rule golden." In short, manners and morals are twin shoots from the same root. The essentially well-bred man is he whose manners are the polite expression of moral principle, magnanimity, and benevolence.
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STYLE OF CARDS The prevailing shape of cards for women is nearly square (about 2 1/2 x 3 inches). A fine dull-finished card-board of medium weight and stiffness is used. A man's card is smaller, and narrower proportionately; and is of slightly heavier card-board. The color is pearl white, not cream. Tinted cards are not admissible. The engraving is plain script, or elaborate text; as the fashion may for the time decree. The responsibility of furnishing the correct style of card rests with the engraver, whose business it is to know the ruling fashion of the day. Any one may have an elegant card by intrusting the choice to a first-class stationer. But it is not half the battle to secure an elegant card. An elegant use of the card distinguishes the well-informed in social usage. This distinction shows when the distribution of cards begins.
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