Good Cheer Stories Every Child Should Know

Good Cheer Stories Every Child Should Know

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Good Cheer Stories Every Child Should Know, by Various, Edited by Asa Don Dickinson This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Good Cheer Stories Every Child Should Know Author: Various Editor: Asa Don Dickinson Release Date: November 23, 2006 [eBook #19909] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GOOD CHEER STORIES EVERY CHILD SHOULD KNOW*** E-text prepared by Juliet Sutherland, Sankar Viswanathan, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net/) "When we rounded the last patch of scrub pines and came upon the long gray house fairly blazing with light ... the effect was stunning." What Every Child Should Know Library GOOD CHEER STORIES EVERY CHILD SHOULD KNOW Edited by ASA DON DICKINSON (Editor of "THE CHILDREN'S BOOK OF CHRISTMAS STORIES," etc.) Published by DOUBLEDAY, DORAN & CO., INC., for THE PARENTS' INSTITUTE, INC. Publishers of "T HE PARENTS' M AGAZINE" 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York COPYRIGHT, 1915, BY DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY ACKNOWLEDGMENT The Publishers desire to acknowledge the kindness of the Century Company, Ginn & Co., the J. L. Hammett Company, Harper & Brothers, the Houghton, Mifflin Company, the J. B. Lippincott Company, the Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Company, the Outlook Company, the Perry Mason Company, Charles Scribner's Sons, and others, who have granted permission to reproduce herein selections from works bearing their copyright. CONTENTS (Note.—The stories marked with a star (*) will be most enjoyed by younger children; those marked with a (†) are better suited to older children.) PAGE *The Kingdom of the Greedy. By P. J. Stahl Thankful. By Mary E. Wilkins Freeman Beetle Ring's Thanksgiving Mascot. By Sheldon C. Stoddard †Mistress Esteem Elliott's Molasses Cake. By Kate Upson Clark The First Thanksgiving. By Albert F. Blaisdell and Francis K. Ball †Thanksgiving at Todd's Asylum. By Winthrop Packard How We Kept Thanksgiving at Oldtown. By Harriet Beecher Stowe *Wishbone Valley. By R. K. Munkittrick Patem's Salmagundi. By E. S. Brooks Miss November's Dinner Party. By Agnes Carr *The Visit. By Maud Lindsay The Story of Ruth and Naomi. Adapted from the Bible Bert's Thanksgiving. By J. T. Trowbridge *A Thanksgiving Story. By Miss L. B. Pingree †John Inglefield's Thanksgiving. By Nathaniel Hawthorne How Obadiah Brought About a Thanksgiving. By Emily Hewitt Leland The White Turkey's Wing. By Sophie Swet *The Thanksgiving Goose. By Fannie Wilder Brown †An English Dinner of Thanksgiving. By George Eliot A Novel Postman. By Alice Wheildon †Ezra's Thanksgivin' Out West. By Eugene Field *Chip's Thanksgiving. By Annie Hamilton Donnell 3 26 41 57 67 72 86 106 115 129 137 143 146 157 159 167 181 198 203 209 220 232 †The Master of the Harvest. By Mrs. Alfred Gatty *A Thanksgiving Dinner. By Edna Payson Brett Two Old Boys. By Pauline Shackleford Colyar A Thanksgiving Dinner That Flew Away. By Hezekiah Butterworth †Mon-daw-min. By H. R. Schoolcraft A Mystery in the Kitchen. By Olive Thorne Miller *Who Ate the Dolly's Dinner? By Isabel Gordon Curtis †An Old-fashioned Thanksgiving. By Rose Terry Cooke 1800 and Froze to Death. By C. A. Stephens 235 248 254 265 276 282 296 299 328 THE CHILDREN'S BOOK OF THANKSGIVING STORIES THE KINGDOM OF THE GREEDY BY P. J. STAHL. T RANSLATED BY LAURA W. JOHNSON. This fairy tale of a gormandizing people contains no mention of Thanksgiving Day. Yet its connection with our American festival is obvious. Every one who likes fairy tales will enjoy reading it. he country of the Greedy, well known in history, was ruled by a king who had much trouble. His subjects were well behaved, but they had one sad fault: they were too fond of pies and tarts. It was as disagreeable to them to swallow a spoonful of soup as if it were so much sea water, and it would take a policeman to make them open their mouths for a bit of meat, either boiled or roasted. This deplorable taste made the fortunes of the pastry cooks, but also of the apothecaries. Families ruined themselves in pills and powders; camomile, rhubarb, and peppermint trebled in price, as well as other disagreeable remedies, such as castor —— which I will not name. The King of the Greedy sought long for the means of correcting this fatal passion for sweets, but even the faculty were puzzled. "Your Majesty," said the great court doctor, Olibriers, at his last audience, "your people look like putty! They [4] are incurable; their senseless love for good eating will bring them all to the grave." This view of things did not suit the King. He was wise, and saw very plainly that a monarch without subjects would be but a sorry king. Happily, after this utter failure of the doctors, there came into the mind of His Majesty a first-class idea: he telegraphed for Mother Mitchel, the most celebrated of all pastry cooks. Mother Mitchel soon arrived, with her black cat, Fanfreluche, who accompanied her everywhere. He was an incomparable cat. He had not his equal as an adviser and a taster of tarts. Mother Mitchel having respectfully inquired what she and her cat could do for His Majesty, the King demanded of the astonished pastry cook a tart as big as the capitol—bigger even, if possible, but no smaller! When the King uttered this astounding order, deep emotion was shown by the chamberlains, the pages, and lackeys. Nothing but the respect due to his presence prevented them from crying "Long live Your Majesty!" in his very ears. But the King had seen enough of the enthusiasm of the populace, and did not allow such sounds in the recesses of his palace. The King gave Mother Mitchel one month to carry out his gigantic project. "It is enough," she proudly replied, brandishing her crutch. Then, taking leave of the King, she and her cat set out for their home. On the way Mother Mitchel arranged in her head the plan of the monument which was to immortalize her, and [5] considered the means of executing it. As to its form and size, it was to be as exact a copy of the capitol as possible, since the King had willed it; but its outside crust should have a beauty all its own. The dome must be adorned with sugarplums of all colours, and surmounted by a splendid crown of macaroons, spun sugar, chocolate, and candied fruits. It was no small affair. Mother Mitchel did not like to lose her time. Her plan of battle once formed, she recruited on her way