Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 1 - A series of pen and pencil sketches of the lives of more - than 200 of the most prominent personages in History
417 Pages
English
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Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 1 - A series of pen and pencil sketches of the lives of more - than 200 of the most prominent personages in History

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
417 Pages
English

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Project Gutenberg's Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 1 of 8, by VariousThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 1 of 8A series of pen and pencil sketches of the lives of morethan 200 of the most prominent personages in HistoryAuthor: VariousEditor: Charles F. HorneRelease Date: August 27, 2008 [EBook #26421]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GREAT MEN, FAMOUS WOMEN, VOL. 1 ***Produced by Sigal Alon, Christine P. Travers and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (Thisfile was produced from images generously made availableby The Internet Archive/Canadian Libraries)Transcriber's note: Obvious printer's errors have been corrected, all other inconsistencies are as in the original. Theauthor's spelling has been maintained.Attila, "The Scourge of God".GREAT MEN AND FAMOUS WOMENA Series of Pen and Pencil Sketches ofTHE LIVES OF MORE THAN 200 OF THE MOST PROMINENT PERSONAGES IN HISTORYVol. I.Frontpage.Copyright, 1894, BY SELMAR HESSedited by Charles F. HorneNew-York: Selmar Hess PublisherCopyright, 1894, by Selmar Hess.CONTENTS OF VOLUME I.SUBJECT AUTHOR PAGEALARIC THE BOLD, 56Archdeacon Farrar, D.D., F.R.S.,ALEXANDER THE GREAT, 10MARC ANTONY, 37ATTILA, ...

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Project Gutenberg's Great Men and Famous Women.
Vol. 1 of 8, by Various
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 1 of 8
A series of pen and pencil sketches of the lives of
more
than 200 of the most prominent personages in History
Author: Various
Editor: Charles F. Horne
Release Date: August 27, 2008 [EBook #26421]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
GREAT MEN, FAMOUS WOMEN, VOL. 1 ***Produced by Sigal Alon, Christine P. Travers and the
Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
(This
file was produced from images generously made
available
by The Internet Archive/Canadian Libraries)
Transcriber's note: Obvious printer's errors have been
corrected, all other inconsistencies are as in the
original. The author's spelling has been maintained.
Attila, "The Scourge of God".
GREAT MEN AND
FAMOUS WOMEN
A Series of Pen and Pencil Sketches of
THE LIVES OF MORE THAN 200 OF THE MOST
PROMINENT PERSONAGES IN HISTORY
Vol. I.
Frontpage.Copyright, 1894, BY SELMAR HESS
edited by Charles F. Horne
New-York: Selmar Hess Publisher
Copyright, 1894, by Selmar Hess.
CONTENTS OF VOLUME I.
SUBJECT AUTHOR PAGE
ALARIC THE BOLD, Archdeacon Farrar, D.D.,
F.R.S., 56
ALEXANDER THE GREAT, 10
MARC ANTONY, 37
ATTILA, Archdeacon Farrar, D.D., F.R.S., 59
BELISARIUS, Charlotte M. Yonge, 64
GODFREY DE BOUILLON, Henry G. Hewlett, 97
JULIUS CÆSAR, E. Spencer Beesly, M.A., 32
CHARLEMAGNE, Sir J. Bernard Burke, 75
CLOVIS THE FIRST, Thomas Wyatt, A.M., 61
GASPARD DE COLIGNI, Professor Creasy, 164
HERNANDO CORTES, H. Rider Haggard, 150
CYRUS THE GREAT, Clarence Cook, 5
DIOCLETIAN, 50
SIR FRANCIS DRAKE, 176
EDWARD I. OF ENGLAND, Thomas Davidson,,
109
EDWARD III. OF ENGLAND, 114
EDWARD, THE BLACK PRINCE, L. Drake, 119
BERTRAND DU GUESCLIN, 127
GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS, Hjalmar Hjorth
Boyesen, 199
HANNIBAL, Walter Whyte, 14
HENRY IV. OF FRANCE, 171HENRY IV. OF FRANCE, 171
HENRY V. OF ENGLAND, G. P. R. James, 129
HERMANN, 40
JOHN HUNIADES, Professor A. Vambéry, 136
CAIUS MARIUS, James Anthony Froude, LL.D.,
25
CHARLES MARTEL, Henry G. Hewlett, 69
NEBUCHADNEZZAR, Clarence Cook, 1
PEPIN THE SHORT, Henry G. Hewlett, 72
FRANCISCO PIZARRO, J. T. Trowbridge, 156
SIR WALTER RALEIGH, 182
SALADIN, Walter Besant, 106
SCIPIO AFRICANUS MAJOR, 18
MILES STANDISH, Elbridge S. Brooks, 189
TRAJAN, J. S. Reid, Litt. D., 42
OLAF TRYGGVESON, Thomas Carlyle, 83
ALBRECHT VON WALLENSTEIN, Henry G.
Hewlett, 194
WARWICK, THE KING-MAKER, 146
WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR, G. W. Prothero,
92
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
VOLUME I.
PHOTOGRAVURES
To f
ace
ILLUSTRATION ARTIST
pag
e

FronFron
ATTILA, "THE SCOURGE OF
Ulpiano Checa tispi
GOD,"
ece
"AND HE WAS DRIVEN FROM
Georges Roch
MEN, AND DID EAT GRASS A 4
egrosse
S OXEN,"
HANNIBAL CROSSING THE R Henri-Paul Mot
14
HONE, te
HERMANN'S TRIUMPH OVER
Paul Thumann 40
THE ROMANS,
ROME UNDER TRAJAN—A C
Ulpiano Checa 48
HARIOT RACE,
THE VICTIMS OF GALERIUS, E. K. Liska 54
Ludwig Thiersc
ALARIC IN ATHENS, 56
h
CHARLEMAGNE AT WITIKIND
Paul Thumann 78
'S BAPTISM,
HENRY V. REJECTS FALSTA Eduard Grützn
132
FF, er
THE ADMIRAL OF THE SPANI
Seymour Luca
SH ARMADA SURRENDERS T 180
s
O DRAKE,
GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS BEF
ORE THE BATTLE OF LUTZE Ludwig Braun 202
N,
WOOD-ENGRAVINGS AND TYPOGRAVURES
ALEXANDER DISCOVERING T
Gustave Doré 12
HE BODY OF DARIUS,
GENEROSITY OF SCIPIO, Schopin 20MARIUS ON THE RUINS OF C
John Vanderlyn 32
ARTHAGE,
THE IDES OF MARCH, Carl Von Piloty 36
THE LAST GLADIATORIAL CO
J. Stallaert 58
NTEST,
CLOVIS PUNISHING A REBEL Alphonse De N
62
, euville
BELISARIUS RECEIVING ALM Jacques-Louis
68
S, David
CHARLES MARTEL AT TOUR Charles Steube
72
S, n
PEPIN AFTER THE MURDER
Th. Lybaert 74
OF DUKE WAIFRE,
A NORSE RAID UNDER OLAF, Hugo Vogel 84
P. J. De Louthe
WILLIAM AT HASTINGS, 94
rbourg
GODFREY DE BOUILLON ENT
Carl Von Piloty 104
ERING JERUSALEM,
SALADIN, Gustave Doré 108
EDWARD III. AND THE BURG
Berthelemy 118
HERS OF CALAIS,
Alphonse De N
BERTRAND DU GUESCLIN, 128
euville
HUNIADES AT BELGRADE, Gustave Doré 146
YORK AND LANCASTER—TH
148
E RED AND WHITE ROSES,
PIZARRO EXHORTING HIS BA
Lizcano 158
ND AT GALLO,
HENRY IV. OF FRANCE AT H
J. D. Ingres 176
OME,RALEIGH PARTING FROM HI
E. Leutze 188
S WIFE,
DEPARTURE OF THE MAYFL
A. W. Bayes 192
OWER,
WALLENSTEIN'S LAST BANQ
J. Scholz 198
UET,
SOLDIERS AND SAILORS
Sleep, soldiers! still in honored rest
Your truth and valor wearing:
The bravest are the tenderest.
The loving are the daring. —Bayard Taylor
NEBUCHADNEZZAR[1]
By Clarence Cook
(645-561 B.C.)
Nebuchadnezzar.
With the death of Sardanapalus, the great monarch of
Assyria, and the taking of Nineveh, the capital city, by
the Medes, the kingdom of Assyria came to an end,
and the vast domain was parcelled out among the
conquerors. At the time of the catastrophe, the district
of Babylonia, with its capital city Babylon, was ruled as
a dependent satrapy of Assyria by Nabopolassar.
Aided by the Medes, he now took possession of the
province and established himself as an independent
monarch, strengthening the alliance by a marriage
between the Princess Amuhia, the daughter of the
Median king, and his son Nebuchadnezzar.In the partition of Assyria, the region stretching from
Egypt to the upper Euphrates, including Syria,
Phœnicia, and Palestine, had fallen to the share of
Nabopolassar. But the tribes that peopled it were not
disposed to accept the rule of the new claimant, and
looked about for an ally to support them in their
resistance. Such an ally they thought they had found
in Egypt.
Egypt was the great rival of Babylon, as she had been
of Assyria. Both desired to control the highways of
traffic connecting the Mediterranean with the farther
East. Egypt had the advantage, both from her actual
position on the Mediterranean and her nearer
neighborhood to the coveted territory, and she used
her advantage with audacity and skill. No sooner,
however, did Nabopolassar feel himself firm on his
throne than he resolved to check the ambition of
Egypt and secure for himself the sovereignty of the
lands in dispute.
The task was not an easy one. Pharaoh Necho had
been for three years in possession of the whole strip
along the Mediterranean—Palestine, Phœnicia, and
part of Syria—and was pushing victoriously on to
Assyria, when he was met at the plain of Megiddo,
commanding the principal pass in the range of Mount
Carmel, by the forces of the petty kingdom of Judah,
disputing his advance. He defeated them in a bloody
engagement, in which Josiah, King of Judah, was
slain, and then continued his march to Carchemish, a
stronghold built to defend one of the few fordable
passes of the upper Euphrates. This important place
having been taken after a bloody battle, Necho wasmaster of all the strategic points north and west of
Babylonia.
Nebuchadnezzar was now put in command of an
army, to force Pharaoh to give up his prey. Marching
directly upon Carchemish, he attacked the Egyptian
and defeated him with great slaughter. Following up
his victory, he wrested from Pharaoh, in engagement
after engagement, all that he had gained in Syria,
Phœnicia, and Palestine, and was in the midst of
fighting in Egypt itself, when the news came of the
death of his father; and he hastened home at once by
forced marches to secure his possession of the
throne. In his train were captives of all the nations he
had conquered: Syrians, Phœnicians, Jews, and
Egyptians. Among the Jewish prisoners was Daniel,
the author of the book of the Old Testament called by
his name, and to whom we owe the little personal
knowledge we have of the great Babylonian monarch.
Of all the conquests of Nebuchadnezzar in this long
struggle with Egypt, that of the Jewish people is the
most interesting to us. The Jews had fought hard for
independence, but if they must be conquered and held
in subjection, they preferred the rule of Egypt to that
of Babylon. Even the long slavery of their ancestors in
that country and the sufferings it had entailed, with the
tragic memories of the exodus and the wanderings in
the desert, had not been potent to blot out the
traditions of the years passed in that pleasant land
with its delicious climate, its nourishing and abundant
food. Alike in prosperity and in evil days the hearts of
the people of Israel yearned after Egypt, and the
denunciations of her prophets are never so bitter as