Hardy Perennials and Old Fashioned Flowers - Describing the Most Desirable Plants, for Borders, - Rockeries, and Shrubberies.
318 Pages
English

Hardy Perennials and Old Fashioned Flowers - Describing the Most Desirable Plants, for Borders, - Rockeries, and Shrubberies.

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Project Gutenberg's Hardy Perennials and Old Fashioned Flowers, by John Wood This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Hardy Perennials and Old Fashioned Flowers Describing the Most Desirable Plants, for Borders, Rockeries, and Shrubberies. Author: John Wood Release Date: July 26, 2006 [EBook #18913] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HARDY PERENNIALS *** Produced by Paul Murray, Janet Blenkinship and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net Transcribers note:As far as possible the illustrations reflect the ratio referred to in the original. A CORNER OF THE AUTHOR'S GARDEN AT KIRKSTALL. HARDY PERENNIALS AND Old-Fashioned Garden Flowers: DESCRIBING THE MOST DESIRABLE PLANTS FOR BORDERS, ROCKERIES, AND SHRUBBERIES, INCLUDING FOLIAGE AS WELL AS FLOWERING PLANTS. By JOHN WOOD. ILLUSTRATED. LONDON: L. UPCOTT GILL, 170, STRAND, W. C. 1884. LONDON: PRINTED BY A. BRADLEY, 170, STRAND, W. C. PREFACE. At the present time there is a growing desire to patronise perennial plants, more especially the many and beautiful varieties known as "old-fashioned flowers.

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Project Gutenberg's Hardy Perennials and Old Fashioned Flowers, by John Wood
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Hardy Perennials and Old Fashioned Flowers
Describing the Most Desirable Plants, for Borders,
Rockeries, and Shrubberies.
Author: John Wood
Release Date: July 26, 2006 [EBook #18913]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HARDY PERENNIALS ***
Produced by Paul Murray, Janet Blenkinship and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
Transcribers note:As far as possible the
illustrations reflect the ratio referred to in the
original.A CORNER OF THE AUTHOR'S GARDEN AT KIRKSTALL.
HARDY PERENNIALS
AND
Old-Fashioned Garden Flowers:
DESCRIBING
THE MOST DESIRABLE PLANTS FOR BORDERS,
ROCKERIES, AND SHRUBBERIES,
INCLUDING
FOLIAGE AS WELL AS FLOWERING PLANTS.By JOHN WOOD.
ILLUSTRATED.
LONDON: L. UPCOTT GILL, 170, STRAND, W. C.
1884.
LONDON: PRINTED BY A. BRADLEY, 170, STRAND, W. C.
PREFACE.
At the present time there is a growing desire to patronise perennial plants, more
especially the many and beautiful varieties known as "old-fashioned flowers."
Not only do they deserve to be cultivated on their individual merits, but for other
very important reasons; they afford great variety of form, foliage, and flower, and
compared with annual and tender plants, they are found to give much less
trouble. If a right selection is made and properly planted, the plants may be
relied upon to appear with perennial vigour and produce flowers more or less
throughout the year. I would not say bouquets may be gathered in the depth of
winter, but what will be equally cheering may be had in blow, such as the Bluet,
Violet, Primrose, Christmas Rose, Crocus, Hepatica, Squills, Snowdrops, and
other less known winter bloomers. It does not seem to be generally understood
that warm nooks and corners, under trees or walls, serve to produce in winter
flowers which usually appear in spring when otherwise placed.
There are many subjects which, from fine habit and foliage, even when
flowerless, claim notice, and they, too, are described.
Many gardens are very small, but these, if properly managed, have their
advantages. The smaller the garden the more choice should be the collection,
and the more highly should it be cultivated. I shall be glad if anything I say
tends in this direction. From my notes of plants useful memoranda may be
made, with the object of adding a few of the freest bloomers in each month, thus
avoiding the error often committed of growing such subjects as mostly flower at
one time, after which the garden has a forlorn appearance. The plants should
not be blamed for this; the selection is at fault. No amount of time and care can
make a garden what it should be if untidy and weedy plants prevail. On the
other hand, the most beautiful species, both as regards foliage and flowers, can
be just as easily cultivated.
The object of this small work is to furnish the names and descriptions of really
useful and reliable Hardy and Perennial Plants, suitable for all kinds of flower
gardens, together with definite cultural hints on each plant.
Perhaps flowers were never cultivated of more diversified kinds than at the
present time; and it is a legitimate and not uncommon question to ask, "What do
you grow?" Not only have we now the lovers of the distinct and showy, butnumerous admirers of such species as need to be closely examined, that their
beautiful and interesting features may gladden and stir the mind. The latter
class of plants, without doubt, is capable of giving most pleasure; and to meet
the growing taste for these, books on flowers must necessarily treat upon the
species or varieties in a more detailed manner, in order to get at their
peculiarities and requirements. The more we learn about our flowers the more
we enjoy them; to simply see bright colours and pretty forms is far from all the
pleasure we may reap in our gardens.
If I have not been able to give scientific information, possibly that of a practical
kind may be of some use, as for many years, and never more than now, I have
enjoyed the cultivation of flowers with my own hands. To be able to grow a
plant well is of the highest importance, and the first step towards a full
enjoyment of it.
I have had more especially in view the wants of the less experienced Amateur;
and as all descriptions and modes of culture are given from specimens
successfully grown in my own garden, I hope I may have at least a claim to
being practical.
I have largely to thank several correspondents of many years' standing for hints
and information incorporated in these pages.
J. WOOD.
Woodville, Kirkstall,
November, 1883.
ERRATA.
For the placing of capital letters uniformly throughout this Volume to the specific
names at the cross-headings, and for the omission of many capitals in the body
of the type, the printer is alone responsible.
Numerous oversights fall to my lot, but in many of the descriptions other than
strictly proper botanical terms have been employed, where it seemed desirable
to use more intelligible ones; as, for instance, the flowers of the Composites
have not always been termed "heads," perianths have sometimes been called
corollas, and their divisions at times petals, and so on; this is hardly worthy of
the times, perhaps, but it was thought that the terms would be more generally
understood.
Page 7, line 8. For "lupin" read "Lupine."
Page 39, line 31. For "calyx" read "involucre."
Page 40, line 27. For "calyx" read "involucre."
Page 46, line 1. For "corolla" read "perianth."
Page 47, lines 3 and 6. For "corolla" read "perianth."
Page 48, last line. For "lupin" read "Lupine."
Page 60, line 16. For "pompon" read "pompone."
Page 64, line 36. For "corolla" read "perianth."
Page 102, line 27. For "Fritillaries" read "Fritillarias."
Page 114, cross-heading. For "Ice-cold Gentian" read "Ice-cold Loving
Gentian."
Page 213, For "Tirolensis" read "Tyrolensis."
Page 214, cross-heading. For "Cashmerianum" read "Cashmeriana."Page 215, cross-heading. For "Cashmerianum" read "Cashmeriana."
Page 275, line 26. For "corolla" read "perianth."
Page 284, line 25. For "calyx" read "involucre."
Page 285, line 1. For "calyx" read "involucre."
JOHN WOOD.
November 14th, 1883.
HARDY PERENNIALS
AND
OLD-FASHIONED GARDEN FLOWERS.
CONTENTS
Acæna Novæ Zealandiæ.
Achillea Ægyptica.
Achillea Filipendula.
Achillea Millefolium.
Achillea Ptarmica.
Aconitum Autumnale.
Allium Moly.
Allium Neapolitanum.
Alyssum Saxatile.
Anchusa Italica.
Anchusa Sempervirens.
Andromeda Tetragona.
Anemone Alpina.
Anemone Apennina.
Anemone Blanda.
Anemone Coronaria.
Anemone Decapetala.
Anemone Fulgens.
Anemone Japonica.
Anemone Nemorosa Flore-pleno.
Anemone Pulsatilla.
Anemone Stellata.
Anemone Sulphurea.Anemone Sylvestris.
Anemone Vernalis.
Anthericum Liliago.
Anthericum Liliastrum.
Anthyllis Montana.
Apios Tuberosa.
Arabis Lucida.
Aralia Sieboldi.
Arisæma Triphyllum.
Arum Crinitum.
Asters.
Aster Alpinus.
Aster Ptarmicoides.
Bellis Perennis.
Bocconia Cordata.
Bulbocodium Trigynum.
Bulbocodium Vernum.
Calthus Palustris Flore-pleno.
Calystegia Pubescens Flore-pleno.
Campanula Grandis.
Campanula Latifolia.
Campanula Persicifolia.
Campanula Pyramidalis.
Campanula Speciosa.
Campanula Waldsteiniana.
Centaurea Montana.
Centranthus Ruber.
Cheiranthus Cheiri.
Cheiranthus Marshallii.
Chionodoxa Luciliæ.
Chrysanthemum.
Cichorium Intybus.
Clethra Alnifolia.
Colchicum Autumnale.
Colchicum Variegatum.
Coreopsis Auriculata.
Coreopsis Grandiflora.
Coreopsis Lanceolata.
Coreopsis Tenuifolia.
Cornus Canadensis.
Corydalis Lutea.
Corydalis Nobilis.
Corydalis Solida.
Crocus Medius.
Cyananthus Lobatus.
Cypripedium Calceolus.Daphne Cneorum.
Daphne Mezereum.
Dentaria Digitata.
Dianthus Deltoides.
Dianthus Hybridus.
Dodecatheon Jeffreyanum.
Dodecatheon Meadia.
Dondia Epipactis.
Doronicum Caucasicum.
Echinacea Purpurea.
Edraianthus Dalmaticus.
Epigæa Repens.
Eranthis Hyemalis.
Erica Carnea.
Erigeron Caucasicus.
Erigeron Glaucum.
Eryngium Giganteum.
Erysimum Pumilum.
Erythronium Dens-canis.
Euonymus Japonicus Radicans Variegata.
Festuca Glauca.
Fritillaria Armena.
Funkia Albo-marginata.
Funkia Sieboldii.
Galanthus Elwesii.
Galanthus Imperati.
Galanthus Nivalis.
Galanthus Plicatus.
Galanthus Redoutei.
Galax Aphylla.
Galega Officinalis.
Galega Persica Lilacina.
Gentiana Acaulis.
Gentiana Asclepiadea.
Gentiana Burseri.
Gentiana Cruciata.
Gentiana Gelida.
Gentiana Verna.
Geranium Argenteum.
Gillenia Trifoliata.
Gynerium Argenteum.
Harpalium Rigidum.
Hedera Conglomerata.
Helianthus Multiflorus.
Helianthus Orygalis.
Helleborus Abchasicus.Helleborus Antiquorum.
Helleborus Bocconi.
Helleborus Colchicus.
Helleborus Cupreus.
Helleborus Dumetorum.
Helleborus Fœtidus.
Helleborus Guttatus.
Helleborus Niger.
Helleborus Odorus.
Helleborus Olympicus.
Helleborus Orientalis.
Helleborus Purpurascens.
Hepatica Angulosa.
Hepatica Triloba.
Hesperis Matronalis Flore-pleno.
Heuchera.
Heuchera Americana.
Heuchera Cylindrica.
Heuchera Drummondi.
Heuchera Glabra.
Heuchera Lucida.
Heuchera Metallica.
Heuchera Micrantha.
Heuchera Purpurea.
Heuchera Ribifolia.
Heuchera Richardsoni.
Houstonia Cœrulea.
Hutchinsia Alpina.
Hydrangea Paniculata Grandiflora.
Hypericum Calycinum.
Iberis Correæfolia.
Iris Fœtidissima.
Isopyrum Gracilis.
Jasminum Nudiflorum.
Kalmia Latifolia.
Lactuca Sonchifolia.
Lathyrus Grandiflorus
Lathyrus Latifolius.
Leucojum Æstivum.
Leucojum Vernum.
Lilium Auratum.
Linum Flavum.
Lithospermum Prostratum.
Lobelia Cardinalis.
Lychnis Chalcedonica.
Lychnis Viscaria Flore-pleno.Lysimachia Clethroides.
Margyricarpus Setosus.
Mazus Pumilio.
Melittis Melissophyllum.
Monarda Didyma.
Monarda Fistulosa.
Monarda Russelliana.
Morina Longifolia.
Muhlenbeckia Complexa.
Muscari Botryoides.
Muscari Racemosum.
Narcissus Minor.
Nierembergia Rivularis.
Œnothera Speciosa.
Œnothera Taraxacifolia.
Omphalodes Verna.
Ononis Rotundifolia.
Onosma Taurica.
Orchis Foliosa.
Orchis Fusca.
Origanum Pulchellum.
Orobus Vernus.
Ourisia Coccinea.
Papaver Orientale.
Pentstemons.
Petasites Vulgaris.
Phlox.
Phlox Frondosa.
Physalis Alkekengi.
Podophyllum Peltatum.
Polyanthus.
Polygonum Brunonis.
Polygonum Cuspidatum.
Polygonum Filiformis Variegatum.
Polygonum Vaccinifolium.
Potentilla Fruticosa.
Pratia Repens.
Primula Acaulis.
Primula Capitata.
Primula Cashmerianum.
Primula Denticulata.
Primula Farinosa.
Primula Marginata.
Primula Purpurea.
Primula Scotica.
Primula Sikkimensis.Primula Vulgaris Flore-pleno.
Pulmonarias.
Puschkinia Scilloides.
Pyrethrum Uliginosum.
Ramondia Pyrenaica.
Ranunculus Aconitifolius.
Ranunculus Acris Flore-pleno.
Ranunculus Amplexicaulis.
Ranunculus Speciosum.
Rudbeckia Californica.
Rudbeckia Serotina.
Salix Reticulata.
Sanguinaria Canadensis.
Saponaria Ocymoides.
Saxifraga Burseriana.
Saxifraga Cæsia.
Saxifraga Ceratophylla.
Saxifraga Ciliata.
Saxifraga (Megasea) Cordifolia.
Saxifraga Coriophylla.
Saxifraga Fortunei.
Saxifraga (Megasea) Ligulata.
Saxifraga Longifolia.
Saxifraga Macnabiana.
Saxifraga Mutata.
Saxifraga Oppositifolia (Lin.)
Saxifraga Paradoxa.
Saxifraga Pectinata.
Saxifraga Peltata.
Saxifraga Purpurascens.
Saxifraga Pyramidalis.
Saxifraga Rocheliana.
Saxifraga Umbrosa.
Saxifraga Wallacei.
Scilla Campanulata.
Sedum Sieboldi.
Sedum Spectabile.
Sempervivum Laggeri.
Senecio Pulcher.
Sisyrinchium Grandiflorum.
Soldanellas.
Spiræa Palmata.
Spiræa Ulmaria Variegata.
Spiræa Venusta.
Statice Latifolia.
Statice Profusa.