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Harper's New Monthly Magazine, February, 1852

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The Project Gutenberg EBook Magazine, February, 1852 of Harper's New Monthly This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at http://www.gutenberg.org/license Title: Harper's New Monthly Magazine, February, 1852 Release Date: June 22, 2010 [Ebook 32945] Language: English ***START HARPER'S 1852*** OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY, Harper's New Monthly Magazine No. XXI.—February, 1852.—Vol. IV. Contents Public Life Of Benjamin Franklin. By Jacob Abbott.. . .2 Napoleon Bonaparte.The Syrian Expedition.By John S. C. Abbott.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Great Objects Attained By Little Things.. . . . . . . . . . 105 The Sublime Porte.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 The Curse Of Gold. A Dream.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Maurice Tiernay, The Soldier Of Fortune.. . . . . . . . . 131 Anecdotes And Aphorisms.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 A Curious Page Of Family History. .. . . . . . . . . . . . 166 The Ass Of La Marca. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 The Legend Of The Weeping Chamber.. . . . . . . . . . 188 An Old Maid's First Love.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 The Poison-Eaters.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 A Child's History Of King John's Reign.

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The Project Gutenberg EBook Magazine, February, 1852
of
Harper's
New
Monthly
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at http://www.gutenberg.org/license
Title: Harper's New Monthly Magazine, February, 1852
Release Date: June 22, 2010 [Ebook 32945]
Language: English
***START HARPER'S 1852***
OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY,
Harper's New Monthly Magazine No. XXI.—February, 1852.—Vol. IV.
Contents
Public Life Of Benjamin Franklin. By Jacob Abbott. . . . 2 Napoleon Bonaparte. The Syrian Expedition. By John S. C. Abbott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Great Objects Attained By Little Things. . . . . . . . . . . 105 The Sublime Porte. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 The Curse Of Gold. A Dream. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Maurice Tiernay, The Soldier Of Fortune. . . . . . . . . . 131 Anecdotes And Aphorisms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 A Curious Page Of Family History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 The Ass Of La Marca. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 The Legend Of The Weeping Chamber. . . . . . . . . . . 188 An Old Maid's First Love. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 The Poison-Eaters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 A Child's History Of King John's Reign. By Charles Dickens.213 My Novel; Or, Varieties In English Life. . . . . . . . . . . 227 The Orphan's Dream Of Christmas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 What Christmas Is In The Company Of John Doe. By Charles Dickens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 What Christmas Is, As We Grow Older. By Charles Dickens.285 Helen Corrie.—Leaves From The Note-Book Of A Curate. 290 The Good Old Times In Paris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Vision Of Charles XI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308 Street-Scenes Of The French Usurpation. . . . . . . . . . 312 What Becomes Of The Rind? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 Mazzini, The Italian Liberal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328 Chewing The Buyo. A Sketch Of The Philippines. . . . . . 340 Sketch Of Suwarow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344 Monthly Record of Current Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346 United States. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
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Harper's New Monthly Magazine, February, 1852
South America. . . Europe. . . . . . . Editor's Table. . . . . . Editor's Easy Chair. . . Editor's Drawer. . . . . Literary Notices . . . . A Leaf from Punch . . Fashions for February. Footnotes . . . . . . .
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1 Public Life Of Benjamin Franklin. By Jacob Abbott.
Benjamin Franklin entered upon his career as a public man when very near the middle of the active portion of his life. His history, therefore, naturally divides itself into two equal portions, each entirely distinct from the other. Until the age of about thirty-five he was simply a Philadelphia mechanic, discharging his duties, however, in that capacity so gracefully and with such brilliant success, as to invest industry, and frugality, and all the other plain and unpretending virtues of humble life with a sort of poetic charm which has been the means of commending them in the most effectual manner, to millions of his countrymen. At length, having accomplished in this field a work equal to the labor of any ordinary life-time, he was by a sudden shifting of
1 Entered according to Act of Congress.
Public Life Of Benjamin Franklin. By Jacob Abbott.
3
the scene in the drama of his life, as it were, withdrawn from it, at once and entirely, and ushered into a wholly different sphere. During all the latter half of his life he was almost exclusively a public man. He was brought forward by a peculiar combination of circumstances into a most conspicuous position; a position, which not only made him the object of interest and attention to the whole civilized world, but which also invested him with a controlling power in respect to some of the most important events and transactions of modern times. Thus there lived, as it were, two Benjamin Franklins, Benjamin Franklin the honest Philadelphia printer, who quietly prosecuted his trade during the first part of the eighteenth century, setting an example of industry and thrift which was destined afterward to exert an influence over half the world—and Benjamin Franklin the great American statesman, who flourished in the last part of the same century, and occupied himself in building and securing the foundations of what will perhaps prove the greatest political power that any human combination has ever formed. It is this latter history which is to form the subject of the present article.
It is remarkable that the first functions which Franklin fulfilled in public life were of a military character. When he found that his thrift and prosperity as a citizen, and the integrity and good sense which were so conspicuous in his personal character, were giving him a great ascendency among his fellow men, he naturally began to take an interest in the welfare of the community; and when he first began to turn his attention in earnest to this subject, which was about the year 1743, there were two points which seemed to him to demand attention. One was, the want of a college in Philadelphia; the other, the necessity of some means of defense against foreign invasion. Spain had been for some time at war with England, and now France had joined with Spain in prosecuting the war. The English colonies in America were in imminent danger of being attacked by the French forces. The influence of the Friends was, however, predominant in the
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colonial legislature, and no vote could be obtained there for any military purposes; though the governor, and a very considerable part of the population, were extremely desirous that suitable preparations for defending the city should be made. There was thus much diversity of sentiment in the public mind, and many conflicting opinions were expressed in private conversation; but every thing was unsettled, and no one could tell what it was best to undertake to do. Under these circumstances Franklin wrote and published a pamphlet entitled Plain Truth, placing the defenseless condition of the colony in a strong light, and calling upon the people to take measures for averting the danger. This pamphlet produced a great sensation. A meeting of the citizens was convened. An enrollment of the citizens in voluntary companies was proposed and carried by acclamation. Papers were circulated and large numbers of signatures were obtained. The ladies prepared silken banners, embroidering them with suitable devices and presented these banners to the companies that were formed. In a word, the whole city was filled with military enthusiasm. The number of men that were enrolled as the result of this movement was ten thousand.
Public Life Of Benjamin Franklin. By Jacob Abbott.
5
Such a case as this is probably wholly without a parallel in the history of the world, when the legislative government of a state being held back by conscientious scruples from adopting military measures for the public defense in a case of imminent danger, the whole community rise voluntarily at the call of a private citizen, to organize and arm themselves under the executive power. There was, it is true, very much in the peculiar circumstances of the occasion to give efficiency to the measures which Franklin adopted, but there are very few men who, even in such circumstances, would have conceived of such a design, or could have accomplished it, if they had made the attempt. The officers of the Philadelphia regiment, organized from these volunteers, chose Franklin their colonel. He however declined the appointment, considering himself, as he said, not qualified for it. They then appointed another man. Franklin, however, continued to be foremost in all the movements and plans for maturing and carrying into effect the military arrangements that were required. Among other things, he conceived the idea of constructing a battery on the bank of the river below the town, to defend it from ships that might attempt to come up the river. To construct this battery, and to provide cannon for it, would require a considerable amount of money; and in order to raise the necessary funds, Franklin proposed a public lottery. He considered the emergency of the crisis, as it would seem, a sufficient justification for a resort to such a measure. The lottery was arranged, and the tickets offered for sale. They were taken very fast, for the whole community were deeply interested in the success of the enterprise. The money was thus raised and the battery was erected. The walls of it were made of logs framed together, the space between being filled with earth. The great difficulty, however, was to obtain cannon for the armament of the battery. The associates succeeded at length in finding a few pieces of old ordnance in Boston which they could
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buy. These they procured and mounted in their places on the battery. They then sent to England to obtain more; and in the mean time Franklin was dispatched as a commissioner to New York, to attempt to borrow some cannon there, to be used until those which they expected to receive from England should arrive. His application was in the end successful, though the consent of Governor Clinton, to whom the application was made, was gained in a somewhat singular way. “At first,” says Franklin, “he refused us peremptorily; but at dinner with his council, where there was great drinking of Madeira wine, as the custom of the place then was, he softened by degrees, and said he would lend ussixa few more bumpers he advanced to. After ten; and at length he very good-naturedly concededeighteen.”
The pieces thus borrowed were eighteen pounders, all in excellent order and well mounted on suitable carriages. They were soon transported to Philadelphia and set up in their places on the battery, where they remained while the war lasted. A company was organized to mount guard there by day and night. Franklin himself was one of this guard, and he regularly performed his duty as a common soldier, in rotation with the rest. In fact, one secret of the great ascendency which he acquired at this time over all those who were in any way connected with him, was the unassuming and unpretending spirit which he manifested. He never sought to appropriate to himself the credit of what he did, but always voluntarily assumed his full share of all labors and
Public Life Of Benjamin Franklin. By Jacob Abbott.
sacrifices that were required.
7
The members of the society of Friends were very numerous in Philadelphia at this time, and they held a controlling influence in the legislature. And inasmuch as the tenets of their society expressly forbade them to engage in war or war-like operations of any kind, no vote could be obtained in the legislature to provide for any military preparations. The Friends, however, were not disposed to insist so tenaciously upon their views as to be unwilling that others should act as they saw fit. It was even thought that many of them were willing to encourage and promote the measures which Franklin was pursuing for the defense of the province, so far as they could do so without directly violating their professed principles by acting personally in furtherance of them.
Various instances occurred of this tacit acquiescence on the part of the Friends in the defensive preparations which were going forward. It was proposed for example that the fire-company which has already been alluded to, should invest their surplus funds in lottery tickets, for the battery. The Friends would notvotefor this measure, but a sufficient number of them absented themselves from the meeting to allow the others to carry it. In the legislature moreover, they would sometimes grant money “for the king's use” the tacit understanding being that the funds were to be employed for military purposes. At one time, before the question of appropriating the surplus funds of the fire company was disposed of, Franklin had an idea—which he proposed to one of his friends—of introducing a resolution at a meeting of the company, for purchasing afire-enginewith the money. “And then,” said he, “we will buy acannonwith it, for no one can deny that that is afire-engine.”
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