Harper
34 Pages
English

Harper's Young People, September 28, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 71
Language English
Document size 1 MB
Project Gutenberg's Harper's Young People, September 28, 1880, by Various This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Harper's Young People, September 28, 1880  An Illustrated Weekly Author: Various Release Date: June 18, 2009 [EBook #29154] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE, SEP 28, 1880 ***
Produced by Annie McGuire
A CHILDREN'S PARADISE. FRANK'S WAR WITH THE 'COONS. WHO WAS PAUL GRAYSON? FORDING A RIVER IN CENTRAL ASIA. THE TUG OF WAR FOUND IN A FROG. JAPANESE LIFE. WHERE DID POTATOES COME FROM? "MOONSHINERS." OUR POST-OFFICE BOX. HOW TO CUT A FIVE-POINTED STAR OBLIGED TO REFUSE.
VOL. I.—NO.8PB. 4URBOLISTHHEDEBRY,S HAN ERWP& RYEPRICEFOURCENTS.  ORK. Tuesday, September Copyright, 1880, by HARPER& $1.50 per Year, in 28, 1880. BROTHERS. Advance.
[Pg 697]
A CHILDREN'S PARADISE.-[SEE NEXTPAGE.] A CHILDREN'S PARADISE. In one corner of the Bois de Boulogne is a pretty zoological garden known as the Jardin d'Acclimatation. The Bois de Boulogne is the pleasure-ground of Paris, and is one of the most beautiful parks in the world. It comprises about twenty-five hundred acres of majestic forests and open grassy meadows, through which flow picturesque streams, tumbling over rocky cliffs in glistening cascades, or spreading out into broad tranquil lakes, upon which float numbers of gay pleasure-boats filled on sunny summer afternoons with crowds of happy children. But the place where the children are happiest is the Jardin d'Acclimatation. There are no savage beasts here to frighten the little ones with their roaring and growling. The lions and tigers and hyenas are miles away, safe in their strong cages in the Jardin des Plantes, on the other side of the big city of Paris; and in this charming spot are gathered only those members of the great animal kingdom which in one way or another are useful to man. The Jardin d'Acclimatation has been in existence about twenty-five years. In 1854 a society was formed in Paris for the purpose of bringing to France, from all parts of the world, beasts, birds, fishes, and other living things, which in their native countries were in any way serviceable, and to make every effort to accustom them to the climate and soil of France. The city of Paris ceded to the society a space of about forty acres in a quiet corner of the great park, and the preparation of the ground for the reception of its strange inhabitants was begun at once. The ponds were dug out and enlarged, the meadows were sodded with fresh, rich grass, spacious stalls were built, and a big kennel for dogs, aviaries for birds, aquaria for fish, and a silk-worm nursery, were all made ready. A large greenhouse was also erected for the cultivation of foreign plants. Here the animals were not brought simply to be kept on exhibition, but they were made as comfortable and as much at home as possible. On pleasant afternoons troops of children with their mammas or nurses crowd the walks and avenues of the Jardin d'Acclimatation. Here, in a comfortable airy kennel, are dogs from all parts of the world, some of them great noble fellows, who allow the little folks to fondle and stroke them. On a miniature mountain of artificial rock-work troops of goats and mouflons—a species of mountain sheep —clamber about, as much at home as if in their far-away native mountains. Under a group of fir-trees a lot of reindeer are taking an afternoon nap, lost in dreams of their home in the distant North. Grazing peacefully on the broad meadows are antelopes, gazelles, and all kinds of deer; and yaks from Tartary, llamas from the reat South American lains, Thibet oxen, and cattle of all
[Pg 698]
FRANK'S WAR WITH THE 'COONS. BY GEORGE J. VARNEY. Last month I spent several weeks at a farm within sight of the White Mountains. One morning the boy Frank came in with a basket of sweet-corn on his arm, and a bad scowl on his countenance. "What is the matter, Frank?" inquired his mother, coming from the pantry. Indignation was personified in him, as he answered, "Them pigs has been in my corn." "I hadn't heard that the pigs had been out. Did they do much harm?" "Yes, the s oiled a eck of corn, sure; broke the ears half off, and some all off.
toh uc m."rnea lareJn diAcd'imcltata,noiehw t erhere is so much ote jnyo ,na dosis a neat littleyts nuync roen runro.Idsa n etprlucif raideeg gn A cage.littozy htf  diwehbrerhsyaa n  ileil frd telahc desolcnit ehponet rhuohgsitivelyng inquip ,eiree dnarehtdein, ed hlee om ,tsraooakgnnn ya fuionmanshis t fo srenwo eht ofe ons  ir,oo dsiowbre ars ndkitrap rieht ni gn            ckliro fgetog ineef lla dna gnidthe  in  ofhdoor ,nahtrere,e dht s akyulit le tls sillatts ,sdnaery bad-temperedezrb.aH  esia v mos yltnedivedna, alimane tlit l ew"dnh ,ga rwnoone as gng hethignirddapien obhg" y. aIn'tonla p sohnrde euciruo gnu, thock is agnsanaidlm yf rits hon ihes auncti fi sadenrocs de ihe tei bofa gnc alssdea omgn thequadrupeds.W tahw sinnihgniynd aal gpilo ang meathat on boutc orohelA w od?won Ps!ieonfp owdf ,maiS morf sei, shaggyrom JavahStealdnl tilt e aasdand qs,gguarfA ,aci swumorfn ta whe andmal,a inaveg aasn toist  Ia.diInn  isretnuh ot lufess very uature, ittdec eruf,ls op g aceraepgud,ar.draehT  gnipoel rsin aeohdot eh thewhene is gama ,esahc ylno dnedodhod e tho  tamtsre .tIi  sel to work for itsae yylisart denin keunyoisg er vaerc eht dna ,reeappfaelts iretu , aroesa h  ltia de or alo,buffecnuiatrnerdera tor al cwhn heet foStu hh roeso The chilAfrica. esag cine ths  i,drapeugtnuh ro One ume.he fof tinamwea pe tslk ha cctra iercat ir nfthgyllussa rs a little doubftlua  sotw ihhc ads ireletton ptiw il hvorpdediilies of and famtns aesltnleileglir eithp ee kto nerdlihc rof reens In p it.fromaw ysda h nattelrohsfo e ehtertsd anwndoy  be thl ka e aolduc aham and the largeagele ric ruf tns,ertt ohe tthwi dni nnare ;o dr alwoatscleaays tlehh nusa tnuits to dister comehT .ug ectapti hhe tar Jarepind  eug .hTvoder meprinen sd theparyerp eht nopu sg fits ldhod an, urrs like a big ac thwneh  etsors kessitkyilea hb ,di tusi tfas d'Acdin atatclimsievoi nffceyra e atonti irdwatoepeek stp dna ,ress, the,motionlibll serril no gise  g ahe tak lilepsnacpuor fo y, aloomry gk vet  oisgneruf sfi birhe tong instool yehT .stsaerabkn ,na dae trbead and cake fropu etot s ehemmuhor-esusn  oe thw taatllarssreg-t ones ad ofe enhc eht ms'nerdliAms.ndhae thg onisdntnellufea ylg inacgr sndmmwilcmi,ea  mvere yeese fro, wild-gdilg tahtetihw nd ay,ra gk,acblnas ews rraawetear e cln thly iesurnd aon lleg--bewtoofc detaerby the numerous ttreni gsim da eanicerAmcspiro tyrabraB eht dna e due arfromcks w daggdeH rere.sthnyrafo, inha ceceip a morf gnie to-cakplum of no e-etsbolba c r foisth fisd ooibsu .drrov oicaoldier, A poor selp soeshwso eosht ro ,l lliw yehe trtdag on lir shtenkc hhtorgulinge pa ste andlalaoy ll ruhcnun,eor  orhpes apvenet ehp ertt ylocket from yourhlaemslaie r ,htchesstriof oops t dna ,ria eht n ighhid teif ldslbwoni gaehtre sutiful fheir beaac euferniweB .d ilythn acgrulef los the thes ofmoofebc f rotrdendougrg he tins vitan rinihsif emps.Promenading w liAdrfcinas aw ark wrelehoro ta niaps uoicap sis hich ssedarneraega l irhco tsise erthtyetpr ahcuorab hw ot ,en on the avenue!N  oowdnre ,of ratWh r ah usd anworcfo dihc erdlvorer cevereren ure.reasis ted htserra ton saw fdiolesthd an, ed ;ub thtmolpiatnred thiee feathenanene d ehtdragttbi cerretea d netnirep fo tned tntwer sue tho  .hT dtidlei eosand ak, loweswalrc s ssoi niebsthit  sm,zeeihid duedln yadtrdea n, when a bird sioatatimclAcd'indraJ eht ni sehcstrihe ong ttchi eawo cnw saao,t hof cisre bt asno eeht h hcroweonor whioss of h sht ercssoi nawAn. ond ve e hrydilot yah ehyppa children say, "eWw li logt  ohtngmo ay,geantr saeb dna p lufitus frlantll pom ao tfrastrodlehw ser no ti woot s tin che s at eaoe fht eoo lhsdaservatorvast cones ot elbissopmine oinl alemthe  eeb dht ,nad yado n to hingst tes ,na dtsargn en thepoultry-hou,airaht ti t si shfin  ie thuaaq libitufnit dr sso mare beauany ddo ynami slwof arvi aheo  ss,iea Shetlaoats or ap nfog ewera s Thd.e er aofir btsni daeopdn ,yndrawwn, nddoup aeh samcrci h ,hwt  iifs  alysiea sa daol sti gni