History  of the World War - An Authentic Narrative of the World

History of the World War - An Authentic Narrative of the World's Greatest War

-

English
760 Pages
Read
Download
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

The Project Gutenberg EBook of History of the World War, by Francis A. March and Richard J. Beamish This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: History of the World War An Authentic Narrative of the World's Greatest War Author: Francis A. March and Richard J. Beamish Release Date: August 6, 2006 [EBook #18993] Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HISTORY OF THE WORLD WAR *** Produced by Don Kostuch [Transcriber's Notes] My father's part in WWI attracted me to this book. I recall him talking briefly about fighting the Bolsheviki in Archangel. "The machine gun bullets trimmed the leaves off the trees, as if it were fall." Like most veterans, he had little else to say. This book mentions his campaign on page 736; "August 3, 1918.--President Wilson announces new policy regarding Russia and agrees to cooperate with Great Britain, France and Japan in sending forces to Murmansk, Archangel and Vladivostok." My father's experience seems to be described in the following excerpt from the University of Michigan "The University Record", April 5, 1999. "Bentley showcases items from World War I 'Polar Bears' "; by Joanne Nesbit. "During the summer of 1918, the U.S.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 28
Language English
Document size 30 MB
Report a problem

The Project Gutenberg EBook of History of the World War, by
Francis A. March and Richard J. Beamish
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: History of the World War
An Authentic Narrative of the World's Greatest War
Author: Francis A. March and Richard J. Beamish
Release Date: August 6, 2006 [EBook #18993]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ASCII
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HISTORY OF THE WORLD WAR ***
Produced by Don Kostuch[Transcriber's Notes]
My father's part in WWI attracted me to this book. I recall him talking briefly about
fighting the Bolsheviki in Archangel. "The machine gun bullets trimmed the leaves off
the trees, as if it were fall." Like most veterans, he had little else to say.
This book mentions his campaign on page 736; "August 3, 1918.--President Wilson
announces new policy regarding Russia and agrees to cooperate with Great Britain,
France and Japan in sending forces to Murmansk, Archangel and Vladivostok."
My father's experience seems to be described in the following excerpt from the
University of Michigan "The University Record", April 5, 1999. "Bentley showcases
items from World War I 'Polar Bears' "; by Joanne Nesbit.
"During the summer of 1918, the U.S. Army's 85th Division, made up primarily of
men from Michigan and Wisconsin, completed training at Fort Custer in Battle Creek,
Mich., and proceeded to England. The 5,000 troops of the division's 339th Infantry and
support units realized that they were not being sent to France to join the great battles on
the Western Front when they were issued Russian weapons and equipment and lectured
on life in the Arctic regions.
When they reached their destination in early September, 600 miles north of Moscow,
the men of the 339th joined an international force commanded by the British that had
been sent to northern Russia for purposes that were never made clear. The Americans
were soon spread in small fighting units across hundreds of miles of the Russian forest
fighting the Bolsheviks who had taken power in Petrograd and Moscow.
The day of the Armistice (Nov. 11) when fighting ceased for other American armies,
the allied soldiers were fighting the Bolsheviks said to be led by Trotsky himself. After
three days, the allies finally were able to drive off the Bolsheviks. While this fight was a
victory for the Americans, the battle led to the realization that the war was not over for
these men. As the weeks and months passed and more battles were fought, the men
began to wonder if they would ever get home.
The men of the 339th generally were well equipped with winter clothing during the
winter of 1918-19 while stationed near the Arctic Circle, where temperatures reached
minus 50 degrees Fahrenheit.
There was little daylight for months at a time. Knowing that the war was over for
other American soldiers, the morale of the troops declined throughout the winter.
Families and friends of the men began to clamor for their return. Politicians
unwilling to support an undeclared war against the Russian government joined in their
demand. A petition to Congress was circulated. Several of the British and French units
mutinied and refused to continue fighting. In early April, the American troops learned
that they would be withdrawn as soon as the harbor at Archangel was cleared of ice.
It was not until June of 1919 that the men of the 339th sailed from Russia and
adopted the polar bear as their regimental symbol. After a stop in New York, the troops
went on to Detroit where they took part in a gala July 4 homecoming parade at Belle
Isle."The converted text for several chapters is copied from Project Gutenberg's eBook
16282, History of the World War, Vol. 3, prepared by Juliet Sutherland, Jennifer
Zickerman, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team. This
edition has minor differences, mostly additional passages and images.
The page formatting has been modified to orient images vertically and to avoid
breaking sentences across page boundaries, to facilitate searches.
When considering dollar values listed in the text, one United States dollar in 1918 is
equivalent to about thirteen dollars in 2006. One United States dollar in 1918 is
equivalent to about 5.6 French Francs in 1918; one Franc in 1918 is equivalent to about
2.3 dollars in 2006.
For additional insight into the pilots and air battles of the war read "The Red Knight
of Germany; The Story of Baron von Richthofen, Germany's Great War Bird" by Floyd
Gibbons. This book is copyright 1927 and will not be freely available online until 2022.
The following pages contain additional maps that may assist in understanding some of
the references to locations in the text. The first shows Western France. The second map
contains many of the locations of the European battles. They are adapted from Putnam's
Handy Volume Atlas of the World, published by G.P. Putnam's Sons, New York and
London, 1921.
The next two maps from the USMA, West Point, map collection, compare Europe
before and after World War I.
Finally, a full map of the European theater has much detail. It should be scaled up to
about 500% for detail viewing. It is derived from a larger map from Rand, McNally &
Company's Indexed Atlas of the World, Copyright 1898. Western France; Southern England
Dieppe
Versailles
Paris
OrleansWestern Front Battle Zone--Eastern France; Southern Belgium; Western Germany
Meuse River
WWI Locales
Lens; Cinde; Mons
Douai;
Valenciennes
Cambri
Landrecies
St. Quentin
Sedan
Argonne Forest*
Noyon; Chauny
Soissons; Rheims
Verdun; Metz
Chateau-Thierry
St. Mihiel
Paris; Sezanne
*The Argonne Forest lies between Sedan and Verdun.Europe Before World War I
Europe After World War IEurope, 1898This is a glossary of unfamiliar (to me) terms and places.
Boche
Disparaging term for a German.
camion
Truck or bus. [French]
charnel
Repository for the dead.
colliers
Coal miner
congerie
Accumulation, aggregation, collection, gathering
consanguinities
Relationship by blood or common ancestor. Close affinity.
deadweight
Displacement of a ship at any loaded condition minus the lightship weight (weight of
the ship with no fuel, passengers, cargo). It includes the crew, passengers, cargo,
fuel, water, and stores.
debouch
March from a confined area into the open; to emerge
Gross Tonnage
Volume of all ship's enclosed spaces (from keel to funnel) measured to the outside of
the hull framing (1 ton / 100 cu.ft.).
inst.
The current month: your letter of the 15th instant.
invest
Surround with troops or ships; besiege.
irredenta
Region culturally or historically related to one nation, but subject to a foreign
government.
Junker
Member of the Prussian landed aristocracy, formerly associated with political
reaction and militarism.Kiao-chau
German protectorate from 1898 to 1915, on the Yellow Sea coast of China. It was on
200 square miles of the Shantung Peninsula around the city of Tsingtao, leased to
Germany for one hundred years by the imperial Chinese government. In 1898
Tsingtao was an obscure fishing village of 83,000 inhabitants. When Germany
withdrew in 1915, Tsingtao was an important trading port with a population of
275,000.
kine
Plural of cow.
kultur
German culture and civilization as idealized by the exponents of German
imperialism during the Hohenzollern and Nazi regimes.
lighterage
Transportation of goods on a lighter (large flatbottom barge used to deliver or unload
goods to or from a cargo ship or transport goods over short distances.)
lyddite
An explosive consisting chiefly of picric acid, a poisonous, explosive yellow
crystalline solid, C6H2(NO2)3OH.
mitrailleuse
Machine gun.
morganatic
Marriage between a person of royal birth and a partner of lower rank, where no titles
or estates of the royal partner are to be shared by the partner of inferior rank nor by
any of the offspring.
nugatory
Of little or no importance; trifling; invalid.
pastils
Small medicated or flavored tablet; tablet containing aromatic substances burned to
fumigate or deodorize the air; pastel paste or crayon.
poilus
French soldier, especially in World War I.
pourparler
Discussion preliminary to negotiation.
prorogue
Discontinue a session of parliament; postpone; defer.punctilio
Fine point of etiquette; precise observance of formalities.
rinderpest
Contagious viral disease, chiefly of cattle, causing ulceration of the alimentary tract
and diarrhea.
Sublime Porte
[French. Porte: a gate] Ottoman court; government of the Turkish empire; from the
gate of the sultan's palace.
Tsing-tao (Qing-dao)
City in eastern China on the Yellow Sea, north-northwest of Shanghai. The city was
leased in 1898 to the Germans, who established a famous brewery.
Uhlans
Horse cavalry of the Polish, German, Austrian, and Russian armies.
ukase
Order or decree; an edict; proclamation of a czar having the force of law in imperial
Russia.
verbund
[German] Interconnection.
Wipers
British soldiers' pronunciation of "Ypres".
Zemstvos
An elective council for the administration of a provincial district in czarist Russia.
[End Transcriber's notes]