Initiation into Philosophy
56 Pages
English
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Initiation into Philosophy

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56 Pages
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Initiation into Philosophy, by Emile Faguet #2 in our series by Emile FaguetCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloadingor redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do notchange or edit the header without written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of thisfile. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can alsofind out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****Title: Initiation into PhilosophyAuthor: Emile FaguetRelease Date: November, 2005 [EBook #9304] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was firstposted on September 19, 2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK INITIATION INTO PHILOSOPHY ***Produced by Ted Garvin, Thomas Hutchinson and PG Distributed Proofreaders.INITIATION INTO PHILOSOPHYby Émile Faguet of the French AcademyAuthor of "The Cult Of Incompetence,""Initiation Into Literature," ...

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Produced by Ted Garvin, Thomas Hutchinson and PG Distributed Proofreaders.
Title: Initiation into Philosophy Author: Emile Faguet Release Date: November, 2005 [EBook #9304] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on September 19, 2003] Edition: 10 Language: English
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK INITIATION INTO PHILOSOPHY ***
**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts** **eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971** *****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****
INITIATION INTO PHILOSOPHY
by Émile Faguet of the French Academy
Author of "The Cult Of Incompetence," "Initiation Into Literature," etc.
Translated from the French by Sir Homer Gordon, Bart. 1914
PREFACE
This volume, as indicated by the title, is designed to show the way to the beginner, to satisfy and more especially to excite his initial curiosity. It affords an adequate idea of the march of facts and of ideas. The reader is led, somewhat rapidly, from the remote origins to the most recent efforts of the human mind. It should be a convenient repertory to which the mind may revert in order to see broadly the general opinion of an epoch —and what connected it with those that followed or preceded it. It aims above all at beinga framein which can conveniently be inscribed, in the course of further studies, new conceptions more detailed and more thoroughly examined. It will have fulfilled its design should it incite to research and meditation, and if it prepares for them correctly.
E. FAGUET.
OCTNNETS
PART I ANTIQUITY
CHAPTER I BEFORE SOCRATES Philosophical Interpreters of the Universe, of the Creation and Constitution of the World.
CHAPTER II THE SOPHISTS Logicians and Professors of Logic, and of the Analysis of Ideas, and of Discussion.
CHAPTER III SOCRATES Philosophy Entirely Reduced to Morality, and Morality Considered as the End of all Intellectual Activity.
CHAPTER IV PLATO Plato, like Socrates, is Pre-eminently a Moralist, but he Reverts to General Consideration of the Universe, and Deals with Politics and Legislation.
CHAPTER V ARISTOTLE A Man of Encyclopaedic Learning; as Philosopher, more especially Moralist and Logician.
CHAPTER VI VARIOUS SCHOOLS The Development in Various Schools of the General Ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.
CHAPTER VII EPICUREANISM Epicureanism Believes that the Duty of Man is to seek Happiness, and that Happiness Consists in Wisdom.
CHAPTER VIII STOICISM The Passions are Diseases which can and must be Extirpated.
CHAPTER IX ECLECTICS AND SCEPTICS Philosophers who Wished to Belong to No School. Philosophers who Decried All Schools and All Doctrines.
CHAPTER X NEOPLATONISM Reversion to Metaphysics. Imaginative Metaphysicians after the Manner of Plato, but in Excess.
CHAPTER XI CHRISTIANITY Philosophic Ideas which Christianity Welcomed, Adopted, or Created; How it must Give a Fresh Aspect to All Philosophy, even that Foreign to Itself.
PART II IN THE MIDDLE AGES
lisopoyh dla lhPorting i by Supptila
CHAPTER VI KANT
.yno troM 
Berkeley: A Highly Idealist Philosophy which Regarded Matter as Non-existent. David Hume: Sceptical Philosophy. The Scottish School: Philosophy of Common Sense.
CHAPTER V THE FRENCH PHILOSOPHERS OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
Locke: His Ideas on Human Liberty, Morality, General Politics, and Religious Politics.
CHAPTER IV THE ENGLISH PHILOSOPHERS OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
CHAPTER II CARTESIANS
Descartes. Cartesianism.
Voltaire a Disciple of Locke. Rousseau a Free-thinking Christian, but deeply Imbued with Religious Sentiments. Diderot a Capricious Materialist. D'Holbach and Helvetius Avowed Materialists. Condillac a Philosopher of Sensations.
All the Seventeenth Century was under the Influence of Descartes. Port-Royal, Bossuet, Fénelon, Malebranche, Spinoza, Leibnitz.
Influence of Aristotle. His Adoption by the Church. Religious Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas.
CHAPTER III THE FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES
Philosophy is only an Interpreter of Dogma. When it is Declared Contrary to Dogma by the Authority of Religion, it is a Heresy. Orthodox and Heterodox Interpretations. Some Independent Philosophers.
CHAPTER II THE THIRTEENTH CENTURY
It Is Fairly Accurate to Consider that from the Point of View of Philosophy, the Middle Ages Lasted until Descartes. Free-thinkers More or Less Disguised. Partisans of Reason Apart from Faith, of Observation, and of Experiment.
CHAPTER III THE ENGLISH PHILOSOPHERS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY.
Decadence of Scholasticism. Forebodings of the Coming Era. Great Moralists. The Kabbala. Sorcery.
CHAPTER IV THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
KteuctrnscoRet an
CHAPTER I THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
PART III MODERN TIMES
HIF E HTFTNEC YRU TTO THERTHINTEECER IHAPTM TH FRO
CHAPTER VII THE NINETEENTH CENTURY: GERMANY
The Great Reconstructors of the World, Analogous to the First Philosophers of Antiquity. Great General Systems, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, etc.
CHAPTER VIII THE NINETEENTH CENTURY: ENGLAND
The Doctrines of Evolution and of Transformism: Lamarck (French), Darwin, Spencer.
CHAPTER IX THE NINETEENTH CENTURY: FRANCE
The Eclectic School: Victor Cousin. The Positivist School: Auguste Comte. The Kantist School: Renouvier. Independent and Complex Positivists: Taine, Renan.
INDEX
INIT
IAT
ION INT
O PHILOSOPHY
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CHAPTER I BEFORE SOCRATES
Philosophical Interpreters of the Universe, of the Creation and Constitution of the World.
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