Jimmy Crow

Jimmy Crow

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Jimmy Crow, by Edith Francis FosterThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Jimmy CrowAuthor: Edith Francis FosterRelease Date: December 28, 2007 [EBook #24061]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK JIMMY CROW ***Produced by Jason Isbell, Mark C. Orton, Christine D. andthe Online Distributed Proofreading Team athttp://www.pgdp.net (This file was made using scans ofpublic domain works in the International Children's DigitalLibrary.)CoverJIMMY CROWByEdith Francis FosterPublished byDana Estes & Co.UNIQUE AND INSTRUCTIVE BOOKSFOR YOUNG CHILDRENCharming tales told in rebus form for wee men and womenWHAT DID THE BLACK CAT DO? GUESS!By MARGARET JOHNSONWHERE WAS THE LITTLE WHITE DOG?By MARGARET JOHNSONJIMMY CROWBy EDITH FRANCIS FOSTEROblong quarto. Bound in cloth with separate cover design for each volumeDANA ESTES & COMPANY, PUBLISHERSEstes Press, Summer Street, BostonJ IMMY CROWBy EDITH FRANCIS FOSTERBOSTONDANA ESTES & COMPANYPUBLISHERSCopyright, 1899-1900By S. E. Casino CompanyCopyright, April, 1902By Dana Estes & CompanyAll rights reservedJIMMY CROWColonial PressElectrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & CoBoston, Mass., U. S. A.TO DAVIDCONTENTS ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Jimmy Crow, byEdith Francis FosterThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at nocost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project GutenbergLicense includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Jimmy CrowAuthor: Edith Francis FosterRelease Date: December 28, 2007 [EBook #24061]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOKJIMMY CROW ***Produced by Jason Isbell, Mark C. Orton, Christine D.dnathe Online Distributed Proofreading Team athttp://www.pgdp.net (This file was made using scansfo
fopublic domain works in the International Children'sLDiibgritaarly.)revoCJimmy CrowyBEdith Francis FosterDPuabnlais hEestde bs y& Co.FUONIRQ YUOE UANNGD  ICNHSILTDRRUECNTIVE BOOKSCharming tales told in rebus form for wee men andnemowBWy HMAAT RDGIDA RTEHTE  JBOLHACNKS OCNAT DO? GUESS!BWy HMEARRE GWAARSE TT HJEO LHINTSTLOEN WHITE DOG?
JIMMY CROWBy EDITH FRANCIS FOSTEROblong quarto. Bound in cloth with separate coverdesign for each volumeEDsAteNsA  PErSesTsE, SS &u mCmOeMr PSAtrNeYet,,  PBUoBstLoInSHERSJ IMMY CROWBy EDITH FRANCIS FOSTERBOSTONDANA ESTES & COMPANYPUBLISHERSBCyo pSy.r iEg.h tC, a1s8in9o9 -1C9o0m0panyBCyo pDyaringah t,E sAtpersi l,&  1C90o2mpanyAll rights reservedJIMMY CROWColonial PressElectrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & CoBoston, Mass., U. S. A.TO DAVIDCONTENTS.Frontispiece
ContentsDedicationHow Jack Found Jimmy Crow9The Christmas Candles15After the Snow Storm21"The Rose Is Red"27Dropping Stitches33April Fool39Jack's Circus Money45Jimmy's Circus51A Whole Bunch of Crackers57Jimmy Crow's Birthday Party63In School69Nutting75EndpieceFHOOUWN JDA JCIKM FMOY UCNRDO JWI.MMY CROW. HOW JACK.IJJiimmmmyy  iCs rao wb igb eclroonwg.s  Jtao cJka cwke. aJrsa cak  iwsh iat eli tstluei t.b oJiym.my"wYeeasr,s  sbirl,a"c ak nfde a"tThhearsn.k  Jyaocuk. "s Jaiyms m"yG ocoadn  sMaoyr noinnlgy, "" Caandw,caw." Jack thinks Jimmy is a funnier pet than a cat ora dog.
O ne day, last summer, Jack was picking low berriesin the pasture, when he saw a young crow hopping inthe bushes. The little crow was lame in one leg. Hehad fallen from the nest. He was too young to fly far,so Jack caught him. He carried him home in his berry-basket. Then Jack took a hammer and nails and woodand built a cage. He named his new pet "JimmyCrow."J ack took good care of Jimmy Crow. He caughtcrickets for him to eat, and gave him fresh water in atin cup. Jimmy's lame leg soon got well. His wingsgrew big, and he could fly. When Jack called, Jimmywould fly to him and perch on his hand or head.J immy Crow liked mischief. He liked to hide thingsand see people hunt for them. Once when Jack wasgetting ready for school, he could not find his top. Hehunted till Mama said he must put on his rubber bootsand be off. One of those boots would not go on. Therewas something in the toe. Jack held it up and shook it,and out fell—the top! Jimmy Crow flapped his wingsand cried "Caw, caw!" That was his way of laughing.Jack laughed too, as he took his books and hat andhurried off. Edith Francis FosterTHE CHRISTMAS CANDLES THE CHRISTMASCANDLES.IIGrandma lives at Jack's house. She has a bird, too.
Grandma's bird is a green parrot. The parrot's name is"Pepper." Jack loves Grandma, but Jack's crow doesnot love Grandma's parrot.P epper can talk like a man, mew like a cat, bark like adog. She can cry and laugh. When Jimmy says "Caw,caw!" Pepper says "C-a-w, c-a-w!" and then laughs.Jimmy crow doesn't like to be laughed at. Once heflew at Pepper, and pushed her off her perch. ButPepper scratched him with her talons and pulled out atail-feather with her beak. Now Jimmy keeps awayfrom her, unless he wants to steal her crackers.O n Christmas Eve children came to Jack's Tree.Mama had trimmed it with popcorn and candles, andhung ornaments everywhere. When she went with amatch to light the candles, they were gone! "Whereare the candles?" cried Mama. "Somebody has carriedthem off, and I can't light the tree." Betty, the littlestgirl, began to cry—two tears ran down her cheeks.Pepper sat on her perch cracking a nut. When sheheard the outcry, she dropped it and screamed"Jimmy Crow, Jimmy Crow! Oh, oh! Oh, oh!" "Oh,naughty Jimmy Crow!" said Mama. "He has hiddenthem. Pepper is telling tales. Run, children, and hunt!We'll play a new game, 'Hunt the candle.'"E ight pairs of feet ran "up stairs, down stairs, in mylady's chamber." At last Betty tipped over a basket,and out rolled the candles. The littlest girl had won! SoMama held her up, and she lit the Christmas Tree.Edith Francis Foster
AFTER THE SNOW STORM. AFTER THE SNOWSTORM.II.IJust after Christmas there was a great snow storm.The drifts were higher than the fence. When it clearedoff, Jack put on his cap and reefer, mittens and rubberboots, and went out. Jimmy Crow went with him. First,Jack took shovel and broom and made a wide cleanpath to the gate. This was "working for Mama." Jacklikes to work for Papa and Mama.T hen friends came to play with him, and they had afine frolic. They rolled big snowballs, and built asnowman. They put an old hat on his head and theshovel over his shoulder. Then Jack rang the bell, andMama came to the door. "Here is a man with ashovel," he said. "Don't you want him to shovel pathsfor you?"I might," laughed Mama, "but somebody has beenahead of him—and here are four hot donuts for thatsmart somebody." Jack gave the other boys donuts,and they all sat down on the steps to eat them. JimmyCrow sat on the fence post. He begged till each boygave him a piece.sT nhoewnm tahne.y  Jmusatd ae sa  Bpoilbe  tohfr esnw oownbea,l lJsi tmo mthy roCrwo awt  ltith eonthe shoulder of the snowman, and the snowballknocked him off into a deep drift! Jimmy Crow was not
hurt, but he was angry. He flew at Bob, and carried offhis cap in his beak, and dropped it into that samedeep snowdrift. Then Bob had to wade through snowover his boots, to get his cap again. And Jimmy Crowperched on Jack's head, flapped his wings, andlaughed "C-a-w, c-a-w, c-a-w!" Edith Francis Foster"THE ROSE IS RED" "THE ROSE IS RED".VITomorrow is St Valentine's day," said Jack. "Whomcan I send a card to, Mama?" "Who is the nicest littlegirl you know?" asked Mama. Jack tried to think. "Iguess it's the one in the big brick house," he said. "Herhair is curly, and she gave me an apple when Iclimbed the tree for her kitten. Her name is Kitty, too,and that's a pretty name."S o Mama took a sheet of paper and painted flowersall around it, with two little doves at the top; and Jackwrote a verse in the middle, with pictures—like thisstory. "Dear Kitty; The rose is red, the violet blue—Ilike kittens so I like you. Yours truly, J." Then he put itin an envelope and went out to send it. Jimmy Crowwent too.O f course Jack could not carry it himself, or Kittywould know who sent it. So he tied it around JimmyCrow's neck. When they reached Kitty's house he sethim down on the steps and rang the bell. Then he ranand hid behind the gatepost.
T he door opened quickly, for Kitty was just comingout with her sled. She looked all around but she couldonly see Jimmy Crow, busy picking a bone her kittenhad left there. Then she caught sight of the envelope,and untied it. She dropped her sled rope and the sledslid down the steps and away to the gate. Jackjumped out and caught it. "Oh, what a pretty card!"cried Kitty. "Thank you, Jack." "No, no!" said Jack in ahurry. "You mustn't know it's me." "Well, then, thankyou, Jimmy," laughed Kitty. "Now let's go sliding." "Allright," said Jack. He put Jimmy Crow on the sled andoff they all went. Edith Francis FosterDROPPING STITCHES. DROPPING STITCHES..VOne day, Grandma sat down to knit on Jack'stshtoatc'ksi tnog,o  abnadd !f"o suanidd  osnhee . n"eAell dtlhe e wsatist cghoense .d r"oOphp edde!a"r,Pepper giggled, "Too bad, too bad!"G arannd dwmhae lno sohkee dg iontt ou ph terw ob ansekeedtl, eas nwd eurne dgeor nteh.e  "tDaeblaer,ldoeuadr!e"r ,s aaindd  schaell.e "d,W "hDeerea r,d od tehaer!y  Tgooo? "b aPde!p"per giggledG arannd dwmhae lno sohkee dc abemhei nbda hcke rt hcrheaeir ,n aeneddl eusn dweerr teh eg ornueg."Dearie me!" she cried, and held up both hands.Pepper giggled and giggled, and shrieked, "Dearie me!
Jimmy Crow!" "Why, yes," cried Grandma, "JimmyCrow is the thief, of course. Now where has he hidthem?"J ust then he flew down and tried to pull out the lastneedle. Grandma saw him, and called Jack. Jacklooked in the coal scuttle, he crawled under the couch,he climbed on a chair and reached into the vases onthe mantle. Jimmy Crow hopped about him andchuckled softly, "Caw, caw!"T hen Pepper giggled and cried out, "Jimmy-Jimmywants a cracker!" "Oh, yes," said Jack, "let's giveJimmy a cracker, and see where he takes it." Jimmycarried the cookie to the top of the cupboard. "That'sthe place. I'll get the ladder," Jack laughed. When hehad climbed to the top, he shouted, "Grandma! Hereare the needles—and all the other things we have lost—your pouch, and the spoon, and my mitten—and—lots of things!" As he came down with both hands full,Jimmy fluttered about his head, and Pepper giggledand shrieked. Edith Francis FosterAPRIL FOOL! APRIL FOOL!.IVJack's Mama was making pies. "Please, Jack," saidshe, "get me some cold water." Jack took his pail andwent out to the pump. Jimmy Crow went too. He saton Jack's shoulder, bouncing up and down as Jackworked the handle.