Life, Letters, and Epicurean Philosophy of Ninon de L
457 Pages
English

Life, Letters, and Epicurean Philosophy of Ninon de L'Enclos - The Celebrated Beauty of the Seventeenth Century

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Life, Letters, and Epicurean Philosophy of Ninon de L'Enclos, the Celebrated Beauty ofthe Seventeenth Century, by Robinson [and] Overton, ed. and translation.This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: Life, Letters, and Epicurean Philosophy of Ninon de L'Enclos, the Celebrated Beauty of the Seventeenth CenturyAuthor: Robinson [and] Overton, ed. and translation.Release Date: January 10, 2004 [EBook #10665]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NINON DE L'ENCLOS ***Produced by Rick Niles, Wilelmina Malliere and PG Distributed ProofreadersLIFE, LETTERSANDEPICUREAN PHILOSOPHYOFNINONDE L'ENCLOSThe Celebrated Beauty of the Seventeenth CenturyROBINSON—OVERTON1903CONTENTSLIFE OF NINON DE L'ENCLOSCHAPTER INinon de l'Enclos as a StandardCHAPTER IIConsidered as a ParallelCHAPTER IIIYouth of Ninon de l'EnclosCHAPTER IVThe Morals of the PeriodCHAPTER VNinon and Count de ColignyCHAPTER VIThe "Birds" of the TournellesCHAPTER VIIEffect of Her Mother's DeathCHAPTER VIIIHer Increasing PopularityCHAPTER IXNinon's FriendshipsCHAPTER XSome of Ninon's LoversCHAPTER XINinon's Lovers (Continued)CHAPTER XIIThe Villarceaux AffairCHAPTER XIIIThe Marquis de SévignéCHAPTER XIVA Family ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Life, Letters, and Epicurean Philosophy of Ninon de L'Enclos, the Celebrated Beauty of the Seventeenth Century, by Robinson [and] Overton, ed. and translation.
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Life, Letters, and Epicurean Philosophy of Ninon de L'Enclos, the Celebrated Beauty of the Seventeenth Century
Author: Robinson [and] Overton, ed. and translation.
Release Date: January 10, 2004 [EBook #10665]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NINON DE L'ENCLOS ***
Produced by Rick Niles, Wilelmina Malliere and PG Distributed Proofreaders
LIFE, LETTERS
AND
EPICUREAN PHILOSOPHY
OF
NINON
DE L'ENCLOS
The Celebrated Beauty of the Seventeenth Century
ROBINSON—OVERTON
1903
CONTENTS
LIFE OF NINON DE L'ENCLOS
CHAPTER I
Ninon de l'Enclos as a Standard
CHAPTER II
Considered as a Parallel
CHAPTER III
Youth of Ninon de l'Enclos
CHAPTER IV
The Morals of the Period
CHAPTER V
Ninon and Count de Coligny
CHAPTER VI
The "Birds" of the Tournelles
CHAPTER VII
Effect of Her Mother's Death
CHAPTER VIII
Her Increasing Popularity
CHAPTER IX
Ninon's Friendships
CHAPTER X
Some of Ninon's Lovers
CHAPTER XI
Ninon's Lovers (Continued)
CHAPTER XII
The Villarceaux Affair
CHAPTER XIII
The Marquis de Sévigné
CHAPTER XIV
A Family Tragedy
CHAPTER XV
Ninon's Bohemian Environments
CHAPTER XVI
A Remarkable Old Age
LETTERS TO THE MARQUIS DE SÉVIGNÉ
INTRODUCTION TO LETTERS I—A Hazardous Undertaking II—Why Love Is Dangerous III—Why Love Grows Cold IV—The Spice of Love V—Love and Temper VI—Certain Maxims Concerning Love VII—Women Expect a Quid Pro Quo from Men VIII—The Necessity for Love and Its Primitive Cause IX—Love Is a Natural Inclination X—The Sensation of Love Forms a Large Part of a Woman's Nature XI—The Distinction Between Love and Friendship XII—A Man in Love Is an Amusing Spectacle XIII—Vanity Is a Fertile Soil for Love XIV—Worth and Merit Are Not Considered in Love XV—The Hidden Motives of Love XVI—How to Be Victorious in Love XVII—Women Understand the Difference Between Real Love and Flirtation XVIII—When a Woman Is Loved She Need Not Be Told of It XIX—Why a Lover's Vows Are Untrustworthy XX—The Half-way House to Love
XXI—The Comedy of Contrariness XXII—Vanity and Self-Esteem Obstacles to Love XXIII—Two Irreconcilable Passions in Woman XXIV—An Abuse of Credulity Is Intolerable XXV—Why Virtue Is So Often Overcome XXVI—Love Demands Freedom of Action XXVII—The Heart Needs Constant Employment XXVIII—Mere Beauty Is Often of Trifling Importance XXIX—The Misfortune of Too Sudden an Avowal XXX—When Resistance is Only a Pretence XXXI—The Opinion and Advice of Monsieur de la Sablière XXXII—The Advantages of a Knowledge of the Heart XXXIII—A Heart Once Wounded No Longer Plays with Love XXXIV—Absence Makes the Heart Grow Fonder XXXV—The Heart Should Be Played Upon Like the Keys of a Piano XXXVI—Mistaken Impressions Common to All Women XXXVII—The Allurements of Stage Women XXXVIII—Varieties of Resistance Are Essential XXXIX—The True Value of Compliments Among Women XL—Oratory and Fine Phrases Do Not Breed Love XLI—Discretion Is Sometimes the Better Part of Valor XLII—Surface Indications in Women Are Not Always Guides
XLIII—Women Demand Respect XLIV—Why Love Grows Weak—Marshal de Saint-Evremond's Opinion XLV—What Favors Men Consider Faults XLVI—Why Inconstancy Is Not Injustice XLVII—Cause of Quarrels Among Rivals XLVIII—Friendship Must Be Firm XLIX—Constancy Is a Virtue Among Narrow Minded L—Some Women Are Very Cunning LI—The Parts Men and Women Play LII—Love Is a Traitor with Sharp Claws LIII—Old Age Not a Preventive Against Attack LIV—A Shrewd But Not an Unusual Scheme LV—A Happy Ending
* * * * *
CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN LORD SAINT-EVREMOND AND NINON DE L'ENCLOS
I—Lovers and Gamblers Have Something in Common II—It Is Sweet to Remember Those We Have Loved III—Wrinkles Are a Mark of Wisdom IV—Near Hopes Are Worth as Much as Those Far Off V—On the Death of De Charleval VI—The Weariness of Monotony VII—After the Death of La Duchesse de Mazarin
VIII—Love Banishes Old Age IX—Stomachs Demand More Attention Than Minds X—Why Does Love Diminish After Marriage? XI—Few People Resist Age XII—Age Has Some Consolations XIII—Some Good Taste Still Exists in France XIV—Superiority of the Pleasures of the Stomach XV—Let the Heart Speak Its Own Language XVI—The Memory of Youth XVII—I Should Have Hanged Myself XVIII—Life Is Joyous When It Is Without Sorrow Letter to the Modern Leontium