Literature and Life (Complete)
178 Pages
English
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Literature and Life (Complete)

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178 Pages
English

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Published 01 December 2010
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Literature and Life, by William Dean Howells This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Literature and Life Author: William Dean Howells Release Date: October 28, 2006 [EBook #3389] Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK LITERATURE AND LIFE *** Produced by David Widger LITERATURE AND LIFE by William Dean Howells Contents BIOGRAPHICAL THE MAN OF LETTERS AS A MAN OF BUSINESS I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII IX. X. XI. CONFESSIONS OF A SUMMER COLONIST I. II. III. IV THE EDITOR'S RELATIONS WITH THE YOUNG CONTRIBUTOR I. II. III. IV. V. VI. LAST DAYS IN A DUTCH HOTEL I. II. III IV V. VI. VII. VIII. SOME ANOMALIES OF THE SHORT STORY I. II. III. IV. V. VI. SPANISH PRISONERS OF WAR I. II. III. IV. AMERICAN LITERARY CENTRES I. II. III. IV. V. THE STANDARD HOUSEHOLD-EFFECT COMPANY I. II. STACCATO NOTES OF A VANISHED SUMMER I. II. III. IV. V. SHORT STORIES AND ESSAYS WORRIES OF A WINTER WALK I. II. III. SUMMER ISLES OF EDEN I. II. III. IV. WILD FLOWERS OF THE ASPHALT I. II. III. IV A CIRCUS IN THE SUBURBS I. II. III. IV. A SHE HAMLET I. II. III. THE MIDNIGHT PLATOON I. II. III. IV. V. THE BEACH AT ROCKAWAY I. II. III. IV. V. VI. SAWDUST IN THE ARENA I. II. III. AT A DIME MUSEUM I. II. AMERICAN LITERATURE IN EXILE I. II. THE HORSE SHOW I. II. III. IV. THE PROBLEM OF THE SUMMER I. II. III. AESTHETIC NEW YORK FIFTY-ODD YEARS AGO I. II. FROM NEW YORK INTO NEW ENGLAND I. II. III. IV. V. THE ART OF THE ADSMITH I. II. III. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PLAGIARISM I. II. PURITANISM IN AMERICAN FICTION I. II. THE WHAT AND THE HOW IN ART I. II. III. POLITICS OF AMERICAN AUTHORS I. II. III. IV. STORAGE I. II. III. IV "FLOATING DOWN THE RIVER ON THE O-HI-O" I. II. III. IV. V. VI. MY LITERARY PASSIONS BIBLIOGRAPHICAL I. THE BOOKCASE AT HOME II. GOLDSMITH III. CERVANTES IV. IRVING V. FIRST FICTION AND DRAMA VI. LONGFELLOW'S "SPANISH STUDENT" VII. SCOTT VIII. LIGHTER FANCIES IX. POPE X. VARIOUS PREFERENCES XI. UNCLE TOM'S CABIN XII. OSSIAN XIII. SHAKESPEARE XIV. IK MARVEL XV. DICKENS XVI. WORDSWORTH, LOWELL, CHAUCER XVII. MACAULAY XVIII. CRITICS AND REVIEWS XIX. A NON-LITERARY EPISODE XX. THACKERAY XXI. "LAZARILLO DE TORMES" XXII. CURTIS, LONGFELLOW, SCHLEGEL XXIII. TENNYSON XXIV. HEINE XXV. DE QUINCEY GOETHE, LONGFELLOW , XXVI. GEORGE ELIOT, HAWTHORNE, GOETHE, HEINE XXVII. CHARLES READE XXVIII. DANTE XXIX. GOLDONI, MANZONI, D'AZEGLIO XXX. "PASTOR FIDO," "AMINTA," "ROMOLA," "YEAST," "PAUL FERROLL" XXXI. ERCKMANN-CHATRIAN, BJORSTJERNE BJORNSON XXXII. TOURGUENIEF, AUERBACH XXXIII. CERTAIN PREFERENCES AND EXPERIENCES XXXIV. VALDES, GALDOS, VERGA, ZOLA, TROLLOPE, HARDY XXXV. TOLSTOY CRITICISM AND FICTION I II III IV V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVII. XVIII. XIX. XX. XXI. XXII. XXIII. XXIV. XXV. XXVI. XXVII. PG EDITOR'S BOOKMARKS BIBLIOGRAPHICAL Perhaps the reader may not feel in these papers that inner solidarity which the writer is conscious of; and it is in this doubt that the writer wishes to offer a word of explanation. He owns, as he must, that they have every appearance of a group of desultory sketches and essays, without palpable relation to one another, or superficial allegiance to any central motive. Yet he ventures to hope that the reader who makes his way through them will be aware, in the retrospect, of something like this relation and this allegiance. For my own part, if I am to identify myself with the writer who is here on his defence, I have never been able to see much difference between what seemed to me Literature and what seemed to me Life. If I did not find life in what professed to be literature, I disabled its profession, and possibly from this habit, now inveterate with me, I am never quite sure of life unless I find literature in it. Unless the thing seen reveals to me an intrinsic poetry, and puts on phrases that clothe it pleasingly to the imagination, I do not much care for it; but if it will do this, I do not mind how poor or common or squalid it shows at first glance: it challenges my curiosity and keeps my sympathy. Instantly I love it and wish to share my pleasure in it with some one else, or as many ones else as I can get to look or listen. If the thing is something read, rather than seen, I am not anxious about the matter: if it is like life, I know that it is poetry, and take it to my heart. There can be no offence in it for which its truth will not make me amends. Out of this way of thinking and feeling about these two great things, about Literature and Life, there may have arisen a confusion as to which is which. But I do not wish to part them, and in their union I have found, since I learned my letters, a joy in them both which I hope will last till I forget my letters. "So was it when my life began; So is it, now I am a man; So be it when I shall grow old." It is the rainbow in the sky for me; and I have seldom seen a sky without some bit of rainbow in it. Sometimes I can make others see it, sometimes not; but I always like to try, and if I fail I harbor no worse thought of them than that they have not had their eyes examined and fitted with glasses which would at least have helped their vision. As to the where and when of the different papers, in which I suppose their bibliography properly lies, I need not be very exact. "The Man of Letters as a Man of Business" was written in a hotel at Lakewood in the May of 1892 or 1893, and pretty promptly printed in Scribner's Magazine; "Confessions of a Summer Colonist" was done at York Harbor in the fall of 1898 for the Atlantic Monthly, and was a study of life at that pleasant resort as it was lived-in the idyllic times of the earlier settlement, long before motors and almost before private carriages; "American Literary Centres," "American Literature in Exile," "Puritanism in American Fiction," "Politics of American Authors," were, with three or four other papers, the