Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 2
298 Pages
English
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Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 2

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298 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson, by Thomas Jefferson This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson Author: Thomas Jefferson Editor: Thomas Jefferson Randolph Illustrator: Steel engraving by Longacre from painting of G. Stuart Release Date: September 30, 2005 [EBook #16782] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE WRITINGS OF THOMAS JEFFERSON *** Produced by David Widger MEMOIR, CORRESPONDENCE, AND MISCELLANIES, FROM THE PAPERS OF THOMAS JEFFERSON. Edited by Thomas Jefferson Randolph. Contents Illustrations Volume I. Volume III. Volume IV. VOLUME TWO CONTENTS LETTER I. TO RICHARD HENRY LEE, April 22, 1786 LETTER II. TO CHARLES THOMSON, April 22, 1786 LETTER III. TO JOHN JAY, April 23, 1786 LETTER IV. TO JOHN JAY, April 23, 1786 LETTER V. TO JAMES MADISON, April 25, 1786 LETTER VI. TO THE COUNT DE VERGENNES, May 3, 1786 LETTER VII. TO JOHN PAGE, May 4, 1786 LETTER VIII. TO WILLIAM CARMICHAEL LETTER IX. TO MR. DUMAS, May 6, 1789 LETTER X. TO WILLIAM DRAYTON, May 6, 1786 LETTER XI. TO W. T. FRANKLIN, May 7, 1786 LETTER XII.

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies,
From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson, by Thomas Jefferson
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson
Author: Thomas Jefferson
Editor: Thomas Jefferson Randolph
Illustrator: Steel engraving by Longacre from painting of G. Stuart
Release Date: September 30, 2005 [EBook #16782]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE WRITINGS OF THOMAS JEFFERSON ***
Produced by David WidgerMEMOIR, CORRESPONDENCE, AND
MISCELLANIES,
FROM THE PAPERS OF THOMAS
JEFFERSON.Edited by Thomas Jefferson Randolph.
Contents
Illustrations
Volume I.
Volume III.
Volume IV.VOLUME TWOCONTENTS
LETTER I. TO RICHARD HENRY LEE, April 22, 1786
LETTER II. TO CHARLES THOMSON, April 22, 1786
LETTER III. TO JOHN JAY, April 23, 1786
LETTER IV. TO JOHN JAY, April 23, 1786
LETTER V. TO JAMES MADISON, April 25, 1786
LETTER VI. TO THE COUNT DE VERGENNES, May 3, 1786
LETTER VII. TO JOHN PAGE, May 4, 1786
LETTER VIII. TO WILLIAM CARMICHAEL
LETTER IX. TO MR. DUMAS, May 6, 1789
LETTER X. TO WILLIAM DRAYTON, May 6, 1786
LETTER XI. TO W. T. FRANKLIN, May 7, 1786
LETTER XII. TO ELBRIDGE GERRY, May 7, 1786
LETTER XIII. TO JAMES ROSS, May 8, 1786
LETTER XIV. TO T. PLEASANTS, May 8,1786
LETTER XV. TO COLONEL MONROE, May 10,1786
LETTER XVI. TO JOHN ADAMS, May 11, 1786
LETTER XVII. TO LISTER ASQUITH, May 22, 1786
LETTER XVIII. TO JOHN JAY, May 23, 1786
LETTER XIX. TO MR. CARMICHAEL, June 20, 1786
LETTER XX. TO MR. LAMBE, June 20,1786
LETTER XXI.. TO MONSIEUR DE REYNEVAL, June 25, 1786
LETTER XXII. TO THE PREVOT DES MARCHANDS, September 27, 1786
LETTER XXIII. TO COLONEL MONROE, July 9, 1786
LETTER XXIV. TO JOHN ADAMS, July 11, 1786
LETTER XXV. TO JOHN JAY, August 11, 1786
LETTER XXVI. TO COLONEL MONROE, August 11, 1786
LETTER XXVII. TO MR. WYTHE, August 13,1786
LETTER XXVIII. TO MRS. COSWAY, October 12, 1786
LETTER XXIX. TO MRS. COSWAY, October 13, 1786
LETTER XXX. M. LE ROY DE L'ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES, November 13, 1786
LETTER XXXI. TO GENERAL WASHINGTON, November 14, 1786
LETTER XXXII. TO JAMES MADISON, December 16, 1786
LETTER XXXIII. TO CHARLES THOMSON, December 17,1780
LETTER XXXIV. TO COLONEL MONROE, December 18, 1786
LETTER XXXV. TO MR. CARMICHAEL, December 26,1786
LETTER XXXVI. TO MR. VAUGHAN, December 29, 1786
LETTER XXXVII. TO JOHN JAY, December 31, 1786
LETTER XXXVIII. TO SAMUEL OSGOOD, January 5, 1787
LETTER XXXIX. TO JOHN JAY, January 9, 1787
LETTER XL. TO JOHN ADAMS, January 11, 1787
LETTER XLI. TO MONSIEUR LE DUC D'HARCOURT, January 14, 1787
LETTER XLII. TO MONSIEUR DE CREVE-COEUR, January 15,1787
LETTER XLIII. TO COLONEL EDWARD CARRINGTON, January 16, 1787
LETTER XLIV TO JAMES MADISON, January 30, 1787 *
LETTER XLV. TO JOHN JAY, February 1, 1787
LETTER XLVI. TO MRS. BINGHAM, February 7, 1787
LETTER XLVII. TO GOVERNOR RANDOLPH, February 7, 1787
LETTER XLVIII. TO JOHN JAY, February 8, 1787
LETTER XLIX. TO MR. DUMAS, February 9, 1787
LETTER L. TO JOHN JAY, February 14, 1787
LETTER LI. TO JOHN JAY, February 23, 1787
LETTER LII. TO THE MARQUIS DE LA FAYETTE, February 28, 1787
LETTER LIII. TO MADAME LA COMTESSE DE TESSE, March 20, 1787
LETTER LIV. TO THE MARQUIS DE LA FAYETTE, April 11, 1787LETTER LV. TO WILLIAM SHORT, April 12, 1787
LETTER LVI. TO JOHN JAY, May 4, 1787
LETTER LVII. TO M. GUIDE, May 6, 1787
MEMORANDA TAKEN ON A JOURNEY FROM PARIS IN 1787
LETTER LVIII. TO WILLIAM CARMICHAEL, June 14, 1787
LETTER LIX. TO J. BANNISTER, JUNIOR, June 19, 1787
LETTER LX. TO JAMES MADISON, June 20, 1787*
LETTER LXI. TO JOHN JAY, June 21,1787
LETTER LXII. TO MADAME DE CORNY, June 30,1787
LETTER LXIII. TO JOHN ADAMS, July 1, 1787
LETTER LXIV. TO DAVID HARTLEY, July 2,1787
LETTER LXV. TO B. VAUGHAN, July 2, 1787
LETTER LXVI. TO M. L'ABBE MORELLET, July 2, 1787
OBSERVATIONS ON THE LETTER OF MONSIEUR DE CALONNE
LETTER LXVII. TO T. M. RANDOLPH, JUNIOR, July 6, 1787
LETTER LXVIII. TO STEPHEN CATHALAN, JUNIOR, July 21,1787
LETTER LXIX. TO THE DELEGATES OF RHODE ISLAND, July 22,1787
LETTER LXX. TO THE COUNT DE MONTMORIN, July 23, 1787
LETTER LXXI. TO MR. SKIPWITH, July 28, 1787
LETTER LXXII. TO J. W. EPPES, July 28,1787
LETTER LXXIII. TO A. DONALD, July 28, 1787
LETTER LXXIV. TO WILLIAM DRAYTON, July 30, 1787
LETTER LXXV. TO JAMES MADISON, August 2, 1787
LETTER LXXVI. TO THOMAS BARCLAY, August 3, 1787
LETTER LXXVII. TO E. CARRINGTON, August 4,1787
LETTER LXXVIII. TO DR. CURRIE, August 4, 1787
LETTER LXXIX. TO MR. HAWKINS, August 4, 1787
LETTER LXXX. TO COLONEL MONROE, August 5, 1787
LETTER LXXXI. TO JOHN JAY, August 6,1787
LETTER LXXXII. TO JOHN CHURCHMAN, August 8, 1787
LETTER LXXXIII. TO MONSIEUR L HOMMANDE, August 9, 1787
LETTER LXXXIV. TO PETER CARR, August 10, 1787
LETTER LXXXV. TO DR. GILMER, August 11, 1787
LETTER LXXXVI. TO JOSEPH JONES, August 14, 1787
LETTER LXXXVII. TO GENERAL WASHINGTON, August 14, 1787
LETTER LXXXVIII. TO COLONEL HUMPHREYS, August 14, 1787
LETTER LXXXIX. TO JOHN JAY, August 15, 1787
LETTER XC. TO JOHN ADAMS, August 30, 1787
LETTER XCI. TO MR. WYTHE, September 16,1787
LETTER XCII. TO JOHN JAY, September 19, 1787
LETTER XCIII. TO CHARLES THOMSON, September 20, 1787
LETTER XCIV. TO JOHN JAY, September 22,1787
LETTER XCV. TO JOHN JAY, September 22, 1787
LETTER XCVI. TO MR. CARNES, September 22, 1787
LETTER XCVII. TO JOHN JAY, September 24, 1787
LETTER XCVIII, TO JOHN ADAMS, September 28, 1787
LETTER XCIX. TO COLONEL SMITH, September 28,1787
LETTER C. TO MONSIEUR LE COMTE DE BUFFON, October 3, 1787
LETTER CI. TO MR. DUMAS, October 4,1787
LETTER CII. TO JOHN JAY, October 8, 1787
LETTER CIII. TO JAMES MADISON, October 8, 1787
LETTER CIV. TO JOHN JAY, October 8, 1787
LETTER CV. TO MONSIEUR LE COMTE DE MOUSTIER, October 9,1787
LETTER CVI. TO MADAME DE BREHAN, October 9, 1787
LETTER CVII. TO MR. DUMAS, October 14, 1787
LETTER CVIII. TO MADAME DE CORNY, October 18, 1787
LETTER CIX. TO THE COUNT DE MONTMORIN, October 23, 1787
LETTER CX. TO JOHN JAY, November 3, 1787
LETTER CXI. TO JOHN JAY, November 3, 1787LETTER CXII. TO THE COUNT DE MONTMORIN, November 6, 1787
LETTER CXIII. TO JOHN ADAMS, November 13, 1787
LETTER CXIV. TO COLONEL SMITH, November 13, 1787
LETTER CXV. TO WILLIAM CARMICHAEL, December 11, 1787
LETTER CXVI. TO JOHN ADAMS
LETTER CXVII. TO JAMES MADISON, December 20, 1787
LETTER CXVIII. TO E. CARRINGTON, December 21, 1787
LETTER CXIX. TO MONSIEUR LIMOZIN, December 22, 1787
LETTER CXX. TO JOHN JAY, December 31, 1787
LETTER CXXI. TO MONSIEUR LAMBERT, January 3, 1788
LETTER CXXII. TO LE COMTE BERNSTORFF, January 21, 1788
LETTER CXXIII. TO WILLIAM RUTLEDGE, February 2, 1788
LETTER CXXIV. TO THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE TREASURY, Feb. 7, 1788
LETTER CXXV. TO DOCTOR PRICE, February 7, 1788
LETTER CXXVI. TO A. DONALD, February.7, 1788
LETTER CXXVII. TO M. WARVILLE, February 12, 1888
LETTER CXXVIII. TO JOHN ADAMS, March 2, 1788
LETTER CXXIX. TO JOHN JAY, March 16, 1788
LETTER CXXX. TO MR. DUMAS, March 29, 1788
LETTER CXXXI. TO THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE TREASURY, March 29, 1788
LETTER CXXXII. TO GENERAL WASHINGTON, May 2, 1788
LETTER CXXXIII. TO JAMES MADISON, May 3,1788
LETTER CXXXIV. TO JOHN JAY, May 4, 1788
LETTER CXXXV. TO THE COUNT DE MOUSTIER, May 17, 1788
LETTER CXXXVI. TO JOHN JAY, May 23,1788
LETTER CXXXVII. TO JOHN BROWN, May 26,1788
LETTER CXXXVIII. TO WILLIAM CARMICHAEL, May 27, 1788
LETTER CXXXIX. TO JOHN JAY, May 27, 1788
LETTER CXL.* TO JAMES MADISON, May 28, 1788
LETTER CXLI. TO PETER CARU, May 23, 1788
LETTER CXLII. TO THE COMTE DE BERNSTORFF, June 19, 1788
LETTER CXLIII. TO THE COUNT DE MONTMORIN, June 20, 1788
LETTER CXLIV. TO DOCTOR GORDON, July 16, 1788
LETTER CXLV. TO JAMES MADISON, July 19, 1788
LETTER CXLVI. TO E. RUTLEDGE, July 18, 1788
LETTER CXLVII. TO MR. BELLINI, July 25,1788
LETTER CXLVIII. TO JAMES MADISON, July 31, 1788
LETTER CXLIX. TO JOHN JAY, August 3, 1788
LETTER CL. TO COLONEL MONROE, August 9, 1788
LETTER CLI. TO MONSIEUR DE CREVE-COEUR, August 9, 1788
LETTER CLII. TO JOHN JAY, August 10, 1788
LETTER CLIII. TO JOHN JAY, August 11, 1788
LETTER CLIV. TO WILLIAM CARMICHAEL, August 12, 1788
LETTER CLV. TO M. CATHALAN, August 13,1788
LETTER CLVI. TO JOHN JAY, August 20,1788
LETTER CLVII. TO MR. CUTTING, August 23, 1788
LETTER CLVIII. TO JOHN JAY, September 3, 1788
LETTER CLIX. TO THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE TREASURY, Sep. 6, 1788
LETTER CLX. TO THE COUNT DE MONTMORIN,
LETTER CLXI. TO M. DE REYNEVAL, September 16, 1788
LETTER CLXII. TO THE MARQUIS DE LA ROUERIE, September 16,1788
LETTER CLXIII. TO WILLIAM SHORT, September 20, 1788
LETTER CLXIV. TO JOHN JAY, September 24,1788
LETTER CLXV. TO M. DE REYNEVAL, October 1, 1788
LETTER CLXVI. TO MR. CUTTING, October 2, 1788
LETTER CLXVIII. TO JAMES MADISON, November 18, 1788
LETTER CLXIX. TO A. DONALD, November 18,1788
LETTER CLXX. TO JOHN JAY, November 19, 1788
LETTER CLXXI. TO JOHN JAY, November 29, 1788LETTER, CLXXII. TO GENERAL WASHINGTON, December 4, 1788
LETTER CLXXIII. TO JOHN ADAMS, December 5, 1788
LETTER CLXXIV. TO MR. SHORT, December 8, 1788
LETTER CLXXV. TO DOCTOR GILMER, December 16, 1788
LETTER CLXXVI. TO THOMAS PAINE, December 23,1788
LETTER CLXXVII. TO JOHN JAY, January 11, 1789
LETTER CLXXVIII. TO JAMES MADISON, January 12, 1789
LETTER CLXXIX. TO JOHN JAY, January 14, 1789
LETTER CLXXX. TO MADAME NECKER, January 24, 1789
LETTER CLXXXI. TO JOHN JAY, February 1, 1789
LETTER CLXXXII. TO JOHN JAY, February 4, 1789
LETTER CLXXXIII. TO WILLIAM SHORT, February 9,1789
LETTER CLXXXIV. TO M. DE VILLEDEUIL, February 10, 1789
LETTER CLXXXV. TO MR. CARNES, February 15,1789
LETTER CLXXXVI. TO DR. BANCROFT, March 2, 1789
LETTER CLXXXVII. TO M. DE MALESHERBES, March 11, 1789
LETTER CLXXXVIII. TO JOHN JAY, March 12, 1789
LETTER CLXXXIX. TO F. HOPKINSON, March 13, 1789
LETTER CXC. TO MADAME DE BREHAN, March 14, 1789
LETTER CXCI. TO JAMES MADISON, March 15, 1789
LETTER, CXCII. TO THOMAS PAINE, March 17,1789
LETTER CXIII. TO COLONEL HUMPHREYS, March 18, 1789
LETTER CXCIV. TO DOCTOR WILLARD, March 24, 1789
LETTER CXCV. TO J. SARSFIELD, April 3, 1789
LETTER CXCVI. TO THE MARQUIS DE LA FAYETTE, May 6,1789
LETTER CXCVII. TO WILLIAM CARMICHAEL, May 8, 1789
LETTER CXCVIII. TO JOHN JAY, May 9, 1789
LETTER CXCIX. TO GENERAL WASHINGTON, May 10, 1780
LETTER CC. TO JAMES MADISON, May 11,1789
LETTER CCI. TO MONSIEUR DE PONTIERE, May 17, 1789
LETTER CCII. TO MR. VAUGHAN, May 17, 1789
LETTER CCIII. TO THOMAS PAINE, May 19,1789
LETTER CCIV. TO MONSIEUR DE ST. ETIENNE, June 3, 1789
LETTER CCV. TO THE MARQUIS DE LA FAYETTE, June 12, 1789
LETTER CCVI. TO JOHN JAY, June 17, 1789
LETTER CCVII. TO JAMES MADISON, June 18, 1789
LETTER CCVIII. TO JOHN JAY, June 24,1789
LETTER CCIX. TO JOHN JAY, June 29, 1789
LETTER CCX. TO THE MARQUIS DE LA FAYETTE, July 6, 1789
LETTER CCXI. TO THE MARQUIS DE LA FAYETTE, July 7,1789
LETTER CCXII. TO MR. NECKER, July 8, 1789
LETTER CCXIII. TO THE COUNT DE MONTMORIN, July 8, 1789
LETTER CCXIV. TO THE MARQUIS DE LA FAYETTE, July 9, 1789
LETTER CCXV. TO THE MARQUIS DE LA FAYETTE, July 10, 1789
LETTER CCXVI. TO THOMAS PAINE, July 11, 1789
List of Illustrations
Book Spines, 1829 Set of Jefferson
Papers
Steel Engraving by Longacre from
Painting of G. Stuart
Titlepage of Volume Two (of Four)Greek Phrase Page216
LETTER I.—TO RICHARD HENRY LEE, April 22, 1786
TO RICHARD HENRY LEE.
London, April 22, 1786.
Dear Sir,
In your letter of October the 29th, you desired me to send you one of the
new lamps. I tried at every probable place in Paris, and could not get a
tolerable one. I have been glad of it since I came here, as I find them much
better made here. I now deliver one, with this letter, into the hands of Mr.
Fulwar Skipwith, a merchant from Virginia, settled here, who promises to
send it to you, with one for Mr. C. Thomson. Of this be pleased to accept, from
me. It is now found, that they may be used with almost any oil.
I expect to leave this place in about three days. Our public letters, joint and
separate, will inform you what has been done, and what could not be done
here. With respect to a commercial treaty with this country, be assured, that
this government not only has it not in contemplation at present to make any,
but that they do not conceive that any circumstances will arise, which shall
render it expedient for them to have any political connection with us. They
think we shall be glad of their commerce on their own terms. There is no party
in our favor here, either in power or out of power. Even the opposition concur
with the ministry and the nation in this. I can scarcely consider as a party, the
Marquis of Lansdowne, and a half dozen characters about him, such as Dr.
Price, &c. who are impressed with the utility of a friendly connection with us.
The former does not venture this sentiment in parliament, and the latter are
not in situations to be heard. The Marquis of Lansdowne spoke to me
affectionately of your brother, Doctor Lee, and desired his respects to him,
which I beg leave to communicate through you. Were he to come into the
ministry (of which there is not the most distant prospect), he must adopt the
King's system, or go out again, as he did before, for daring to depart from it.
When we see, that through all the changes of ministry, which have taken
place during the present reign, there has never been a change of system with
respect to America, we cannot reasonably doubt, that this is the system of the
King himself. His obstinacy of character we know; his hostility we have
known, and it is embittered by ill success. If ever this nation, during his life,
enter into arrangements with us, it must be in consequence of events, of
which they do not at present see a possibility. The object of the present
ministry is to buoy up the nation with flattering calculations of their present
prosperity, and to make them believe they are better without us than with us.
This they seriously believe; for what is it men cannot be made to believe? I
dined the other day in a company of the ministerial party. A General Clark, a
Scotchman and ministerialist, sat next to me. He introduced the subject of
American affairs, and in the course of the conversation told me, that were
America to petition parliament to be again received on their former footing, the
petition would be very generally rejected. He was serious in this, and I think it
was the sentiment of the company, and is the sentiment perhaps of the nation.
In this they are wise, but for a foolish reason. They think they lost more by
suffering us to participate of their commercial privileges, at home and abroad,
than they lose by our political severance. The true reason, however, why such
an application should be rejected, is, that in a very short time we should
oblige them to add another hundred millions to their debt, in unsuccessful
attempts to retain the subjection offered to them. They are at present in a
frenzy, and will not be recovered from it, till they shall have leaped the
precipice they are now so boldly advancing to. Writing from England, I write
you nothing but English news. The continent, at present, furnishes nothing
interesting. I shall hope the favor of your letters, at times. The proceedings
and views of Congress and of the Assemblies, the opinions and dispositions