Michelangelo
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Michelangelo

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Michelangelo, by Romain RollandThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: MichelangeloAuthor: Romain RollandTranslator: Frederick StreetRelease Date: June 10, 2010 [EBook #32762]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MICHELANGELO ***Produced by Chuck Greif, University of Michigan Librariesand the Online Distributed Proofreading Team athttp://www.pgdp.netMICHELANGELOPORTRAIT OF MICHELANGELO BY MARCELLOVENUSTI Capitoline Museum, Rome. PORTRAIT OFMICHELANGELO BY MARCELLO VENUSTICapitoline Museum, Rome.MICHELANGELOBYROMAIN ROLLANDAuthor of "Beethoven," "Jean Christophe," etc.Translated by FREDERICK STREETILLUSTRATEDimage of logoNEW YORKDUFFIELD & COMPANY1921Copyright, 1915 byDUFFIELD & COMPANYNOTEThis life of Michelangelo is published in France in the series called"Les Maîtres de l'Art," and is here translated into English for the firsttime. It is entirely distinct from a study of Michelangelo by RomainRolland which appeared some time ago.CONTENTSpageIntroduction xiChapter I—Childhood and Youth (1475-1505) 1Chapter II—Michelangelo and Julius II (1505-1512) 26Chapter III—The Failure of the Great Plans (1513-1534) 45Chapter IV—Vittoria Colonna (1535-1547) 80Chapter V—Old Age and ...

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Published 01 December 2010
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Michelangelo, by Romain Rolland This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Michelangelo Author: Romain Rolland Translator: Frederick Street Release Date: June 10, 2010 [EBook #32762] Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MICHELANGELO ***
Produced by Chuck Greif, University of Michigan Libraries and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
MICHELANGELO
PORTRAIT OF MICHELANGELO BY MARCELLO VENUSTI Capitoline Museum, Rome.PORTRAIT OF MICHELANGELO BY MARCELLO VENUSTI Capitoline Museum, Rome.
MICHELANGELO
BY
NIR LOALDNuAhtroROMAte.c,e "phtoishr CanJe "",nevohteeB" fo 
ILLUSTRATED
image of logo
Translated by FREDERICK STREET
NOTE This life of Michelangelo is published in France in the series called "Les Maîtres de l'Art," and is here translated into English for the first time. It is entirely distinct from a study of Michelangelo by Romain Rolland which appeared some time ago.
NEW YORK DUFFIELD & COMPANY 1921 Copyright, 1915 by DUFFIELD & COMPANY
CONTENTS page Introductionxi Chapter I—Childhood and Youth (1475-1505)1 Chapter II—Michelangelo and Julius II (1505-1512)26 Chapter III—The Failure of the Great Plans (1513-1534)45 Chapter IV—Vittoria Colonna (1535-1547)80 Chapter V—Old Age and Death (1547-1564)108 Chapter VI—The Genius of Michelangelo and His Influence on ItalianArt142 Chronological Table 169 Catalogue of the Principal Works of Michelangelo in Public Collections 175 Note on the Drawings 179 Bibliography 181 Index 185 Footnotes
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INTRODUCTION The life of Michelangelo offers one of the most striking examples of the influence that a great man can have on his time. At the moment of his birth in the second half of the fifteenth century the serenity of Ghirlandajo and of Bramante illuminated Italian art. Florentine sculpture seemed about to languish away from an excess of grace in the delicate and meticulous art of Rossellino, Disiderio, Mino da Fiesole, Agostino di Duccio, Benedetto da Maiano and Andrea Sansovino. Michelangelo burst like a thunder-storm into the heavy, overcharged sky of Florence. This storm had undoubtedly been gathering for a long time in the extraordinary intellectual and emotional tension of Italy which was to cause the Savonarolist upheaval. Nothing like Michelangelo had ever appeared before. He passed like a whirlwind, and after he had passed the brilliant and sensual Florence of Lorenzo de' Medici and Botticelli, of Verocchio and Lionardo, was ended forever. All that harmonious living and dreaming, that spirit of analysis, that aristocratic and courtly poetry, the whole elegant and subtle art of the "Quattrocento," was swept away at one blow. Even after he had been gone for a long time, the world of art was still whirled along in the eddies of his wild spirit. Not the most remote corner was sheltered from the tempest; it drew in its wake all the arts together. Michelangelo captured painting, sculpture, architecture and poetry, all at once; he breathed into them the frenzy of his vigour and of his overwhelming idealism. No one understood him, yet all imitated him. Every one of his great works, the David, the cartoon for the war against Pisa, the vault of the Sistine Chapel, the Last Judgment, St. Peter's, dominated generations of artists and enslaved them. From every one of these creations radiated despotic power, a power that came above all from Michelangelo's personality and from that tremendous life which covered almost a century. No one work can be detached from that life and studied separately. They are all fragments of one monument, and the mistake that most historians make is to mutilate this genius by dividing it into different pieces. We must try to follow the entire course of the torrent from its beginning to its end if we are to have any comprehension of its formidable unity.
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