Myths and Legends of Our Own Land — Volume 08 : on the Pacific Slope
48 Pages
English
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Myths and Legends of Our Own Land — Volume 08 : on the Pacific Slope

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
48 Pages
English

Description

The Project Gutenberg EBook of On The Pacific Slope, by Charles M. SkinnerThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: On The Pacific Slope Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Volume 8.Author: Charles M. SkinnerRelease Date: December 14, 2004 [EBook #6613]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ON THE PACIFIC SLOPE ***Produced by David WidgerMYTHS AND LEGENDS OF OUR OWN LAND By Charles M. SkinnerVol. 8.ON THE PACIFIC SLOPECONTENTS:The Voyager of the WhulgeTamanous of TacomaThe Devil and the DallesCascades of the ColumbiaThe Death of UmatillaHunger ValleyThe Wrath of ManitouThe Spook of Misery HillThe Queen of Death ValleyBridal Veil FallThe Governor's Right EyeThe Prisoner in American ShaftON THE PACIFIC COASTTHE VOYAGER OF WHULGELike the ancient Greeks, the Siwash of the Northwest invest the unseen world with spiritual intelligence. Every tree has asoul; the forests were peopled with good and evil genii, the latter receiving oblation at the devil-dances, for it was notworth while to appease those already good; and the mountains are the home of tamanouses, or guardian spirits, thatsometimes fight together—as, when the spirits of Mount Tacoma engaged with ...

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 01 December 2010
Reads 48
Language English

Exrait

STlhoep eP,r objye cCt hGarulteesn bMe. rgS kEinBnoeork of On The PacificThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere atno cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under theterms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: On The Pacific Slope Myths And Legends OfOur Own Land, Volume 8.Author: Charles M. SkinnerRelease Date: December 14, 2004 [EBook #6613]Language: English*E*B* OSTOAK ROT NO TF HTEH IPSA CPIRFIOCJ ESCLTO PGEU *T*E*NBERGProduced by David Widger
OMFY TOHUSR  AONWD NL ELAGNEDNDS                                   By                           Charles M. SkinnerVol. 8.ON THE PACIFIC SLOPE
CONTENTS:The Voyager of the WhulgeTamanous of TacomaThe Devil and the DallesCascades of the ColumbiaThe Death of UmatillaHunger ValleyThe Wrath of ManitouThe Spook of Misery HillThe Queen of Death ValleyBridal Veil FallThe Governor's Right EyeThe Prisoner in American ShaftCOON ATSHTE PACIFICTHE VOYAGER OF WHULGE
Like the ancient Greeks, the Siwash of theNorthwest invest the unseen world with spiritualintelligence. Every tree has a soul; the forests werepeopled with good and evil genii, the latterreceiving oblation at the devil-dances, for it was notworth while to appease those already good; andthe mountains are the home of tamanouses, orguardian spirits, that sometimes fight together—as,when the spirits of Mount Tacoma engaged withthose of Mount Hood, fire and melted stone burstfrom their peaks, their bellowing was heard afar,and some of the rocks flung by Tacoma fell short,blocking the Columbia about the Dalles.Across these fantastic reports of older time therecome echoes of a later instruction, adapted andblended into native legend so that the point ofdivision cannot be indicated. Such is that of themysterious voyager of the Whulge—the Siwashname for the sound that takes the name of Pugetfrom one of Vancouver's officers. Across this bodyof water the stranger came in a copper canoe thatborrowed the glories of the morning. When he hadlanded and sent for all the red men, far and near,he addressed to them a doctrine that provokedexpressions of contempt—a doctrine of love.To fight and steal no more, to give of their goods tomen in need, to forgive their enemies,—they couldnot understand such things. He promised—thisradiant stranger—to those who lived right, eternallife on seas and hills more fair than these of earth,but they did not heed him. At last, wearying of histalk, they dragged him to a tree and nailed him fast
to it, with pegs through his hands and feet, andtjeheerire vdi catinmd sd iann tcheed  daebvoilu-td ahinmc,e ,a us ntthil ehyi sd ihde aabd ofuetll onhis breast and his life went out.A great storm, with thunderings and earthquakes!They took the body down and would have buried it,but, to! it arose to its feet, as the sun burst forth,and resumed its preaching. Then they took thevoyager's word for truth and never harmed himmore, while they grew less warlike as each yearwent by until, of all Indians, they were mostpeaceable.
TAMANOUS OF TACOMAMount Tacoma has always been a place ofsuperstitious regard among the Siwash (Sauvage)of the Northwest. In their myths it was the place ofrefuge for the last man when the Whulge was soswollen after long rain that its waters covered theearth. All other men were drowned. The wavespursued the one man as he climbed, rising higherand higher until they came to his knees, his waist,his breast. Hope was almost gone, and he felt thatthe next wave would launch him into the blackocean that raged about him, when one of thetamanouses of the peak, taking pity on him, turnedhis feet to stone. The storm ceased, and thewaters fell away. The man still stood there, his feeta part of the peak, and he mourned that he couldnot descend to where the air was balmy and theflowers were opening. The Spirit of all Things cameand bade him sleep, and, after his eyes wereclosed, tore out one of his ribs and changed it to awoman. When lifted out of the rock the manawoke, and, turning with delight to the woman, heled her to the sea-shore, and there in a forestbower they made their home. There the humanrace was recreated.On the shore of the Whulge in after years lived anIndian miser—rare personage—who dried salmonand jerked the meat that he did not use, and sold itto his fellow-men for hiaqua—the wampum of thePacific tribes. The more of this treasure he got, the
more he wanted—even as if it were dollars. Oneday, while hunting on the slopes of Mount Tacoma,he looked along its snow-fields, climbing to the sky,and, instead of doing homage to the tamanous, ordivinity of the mountain, he only sighed, "If I couldonly get more hiaqua!"Sounded a voice in his ear: "Dare you go to mytreasure caves?""I dare!" cried the miser.The rocks and snows and woods roared back thewords so quick in echoes that the noise was likethat of a mountain laughing. The wind came upagain to whisper the secret in the man's ear, andwith an elk-horn for pick and spade he began theascent of the peak. Next morning he had reachedthe crater's rim, and, hurrying down the declivity,he passed a rock shaped like a salmon, next, onein the form of a kamas-root, and presently a thirdin likeness of an elk's head. "'Tis a tamanous hasspoken!" he exclaimed, as he looked at them.At the foot of the elk's head he began to dig. Underthe snow he came to crusts of rock that gave ahollow sound, and presently he lifted a scale ofstone that covered a cavity brimful of shells morebeautiful, more precious, more abundant than hiswildest hopes had pictured. He plunged his armsamong them to the shoulder—he laughed andfondled them, winding the strings of them about hisarms and waist and neck and filling his hands.Then, heavily burdened, he started homeward.
In his eagerness to take away his treasure hemade no offerings of hiaqua strings to the stonetamanouses in the crater, and hardly had he begunthe descent of the mountain's western face beforehe began to be buffeted with winds. The angry godwrapped himself in a whirling tower of cloud and fellupon him, drawing darkness after. Hands seemedto clutch at him out of the storm: they tore at histreasure, and, in despair, he cast away a cord of itin sacrifice. The storm paused for a moment, andwhen it returned upon him with scream and flashand roar he parted with another. So, going down inthe lulls, he reached timber just as the last handfulof his wealth was wrenched from his grasp andflung upon the winds. Sick in heart and body, hefell upon a moss-heap, senseless. He awoke andarose stiffly, after a time, and resumed his journey.In his sleep a change had come to the man. Hishair was matted and reached to his knees; hisjoints creaked; his food supply was gone; but hepicked kamas bulbs and broke his fast, and theworld seemed fresh and good to him. He lookedback at Tacoma and admired the splendor of itssnows and the beauty of its form, and had never acare for the riches in its crater. The wood wasstrange to him as he descended, but at sunset hereached his wigwam, where an aged woman wascooking salmon. Wife and husband recognizedeach other, though he had been asleep and she a-sorrowing for years. In his joy to be at home themiser dug up all his treasure that he had secretedand gave of his wealth and wisdom to whosoneeded them. Life, love, and nature were enough,
he found,again.  dna ehvenre rb devat ehtmasuona
THE DEVIL AND THE DALLESIn days when volcanoes were playing in theNorthwest and the sternly beautiful valley of theColumbia was a hell of ash and lava, the fiend menof the land met at intervals on the heated rocks toguzzle and riot together. It was at one of thesemeetings in the third summer after Tacoma hadstopped spouting that the devil urged a lesson fromthe growing peace and joy of nature, and prayedthe fiend men to desist from killing and eating eachother and live in love.With a howl of rage at such a proposal they setupon him, tossing their tails in such a threateningmanner that he deemed it best to be off, and ashis hoofs clattered over the country his brain wasbusy in devising an escape. Nearing the mountainbulwarks of an inland sea, whose breakers'rhythmic roar he heard above the yells of hispursuers, a hope came into his head, and newvigor into his tail, though you might have thoughtthe latter accession was not needed, for his tailwas of prodigious length and strength. He whirledthis limb aloft and beat it on the earth. A chasmopened at the stroke, and the devil skipped acrossto the safe side of it.lSeaafpe ?a nNdo ;c faomr et hbee fsiiedned  himme. n Tihn ea tdovramnecnet teodo ok ntehencootu led qtuharla tsoh  aa tnhy otuwsoa nofd .t hHee mb raat nodnische,e db uhti she was