Narrative and Legendary Poems: the Bridal of Pennacook - From Volume I., the Works of Whittier
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Narrative and Legendary Poems: the Bridal of Pennacook - From Volume I., the Works of Whittier

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Project Gutenberg EBook, The Bridal of Pennacook, by Whittier From Volume I., The Works of Whittier: Narrative andLegendary Poems #6 in our series by John Greenleaf WhittierCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloadingor redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do notchange or edit the header without written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of thisfile. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can alsofind out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts****EBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971*******These EBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers*****Title: Narrative and Legendary Poems: The Bridal of Pennacook From Volume I., The Works of WhittierAuthor: John Greenleaf WhittierRelease Date: Dec, 2005 [EBook #9561] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first postedon October 2, 2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK, THE BRIDAL OF PENNACOOK ***This eBook was produced by David Widger [widger@cecomet.net]NARRATIVE AND ...

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*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK, THE BRIDAL OF PENNACOOK ***
This eBook was produced by David Widger [widger@cecomet.net]
NARRATIVE AND LEGENDARY POEMS BY JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER
**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts** **EBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971** *****These EBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers*****
Edition: 10 Language: English
Title: Narrative and Legendary Poems: The Bridal of Pennacook From Volume I., The Works of Whittier Author: John Greenleaf Whittier Release Date: Dec, 2005 [EBook #9561] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on October 2, 2003]
THE BRIDAL OF PENNACOOK I. THE MERRIMAC II. THE BASHABA III. THE DAUGHTER IV. THE WEDDING V. THE NEW HOME VI. AT PENNACOOK VII. THE DEPARTURE VIII. SONG OF INDIAN WOMEN
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Winnepurkit, otherwise called George, Sachem of Saugus, married a daughter of Passaconaway, the great Pennacook chieftain, in 1662. The wedding took place at Pennacook (now Concord, N. H.), and the ceremonies closed with a great feast. According to the usages of the chiefs, Passaconaway ordered a select number of his men to accompany the newly-married couple to the dwelling of the husband, where in turn there was another great feast. Some time after, the wife of Winnepurkit expressing a desire to visit her father's house was permitted to go, accompanied by a brave escort of her husband's chief men. But when she wished to return, her father sent a messenger to Saugus, informing her husband, and asking him to come and take her away. He returned for answer that he had escorted his wife to her father's house in a style that became a chief, and that now if she wished to return, her father must send her back, in the same way. This Passaconaway refused to do, and it is said that here terminated the connection of his daughter with the Saugus chief.—Vide MORTON'S New Canaan.
THE BRIDAL OF PENNACOOK.
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The lawyer in the pauses of the storm Went angling down the Saco, and, returning, Recounted his adventures and mishaps; Gave us the history of his scaly clients, Mingling with ludicrous yet apt citations Of barbarous law Latin, passages From Izaak Walton's Angler, sweet and fresh As the flower-skirted streams of Staffordshire, Where, under aged trees, the southwest wind Of soft June mornings fanned the thin, white hair Of the sage fisher. And, if truth be told, Our youthful candidate forsook his sermons, His commentaries, articles and creeds, For the fair page of human loveliness, The missal of young hearts, whose sacred text Is music, its illumining, sweet smiles. He sang the songs she loved; and in his low,
It chanced that as we turned upon our homeward way, A drear northeastern storm came howling up The valley of the Saco; and that girl Who had stood with us upon Mount Washington, Her brown locks ruffled by the wind which whirled In gusts around its sharp, cold pinnacle, Who had joined our gay trout-fishing in the streams Which lave that giant's feet; whose laugh was heard Like a bird's carol on the sunrise breeze Which swelled our sail amidst the lake's green islands, Shrank from its harsh, chill breath, and visibly drooped Like a flower in the frost. So, in that quiet inn Which looks from Conway on the mountains piled Heavily against the horizon of the north, Like summer thunder-clouds, we made our home And while the mist hung over dripping hills, And the cold wind-driven rain-drops all day long Beat their sad music upon roof and pane, We strove to cheer our gentle invalid.