Narrative and Lyric Poems (first series) for use in the Lower School
97 Pages
English

Narrative and Lyric Poems (first series) for use in the Lower School

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Narrative and Lyric Poems, by O. J. StevensonThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: Narrative and Lyric Poems (first series) for use in the Lower SchoolAuthor: O. J. StevensonRelease Date: August 15, 2004 [EBook #13184]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NARRATIVE AND LYRIC POEMS ***Produced by Al HainesNARRATIVE AND LYRIC POEMS(FIRST SERIES)FOR USE IN THE LOWER SCHOOLWITH ANNOTATIONS BYO. J. STEVENSON, M.A., D.PAED.,Professor of English, Ontario Agricultural College.TORONTOTHE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITEDCopyright, Canada, 1912, by THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED,Toronto, Ontario.PREFACEThe Narrative and Lyric Poems contained in this volume are those prescribed by the Department of Education forexamination for Junior and Senior Public School Diplomas, and for the Senior High School Entrance, and Entranceinto the Model Schools. (Circular 58.)In arranging the order of the poems, the Editor has taken into consideration the character of the selections with theobject both of grading them in the order of increasing difficulty, and of securing variety in the subjects treated. Theteacher may, however, follow his own judgment as to the order in which the poems should be taken up in class ...

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Published 08 December 2010
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Narrative and Lyric Poems, by O. J. Stevenson This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Narrative and Lyric Poems (first series) for use in the Lower School Author: O. J. Stevenson Release Date: August 15, 2004 [EBook #13184] Language: English *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NARRATIVE AND LYRIC POEMS *** Produced by Al Haines NARRATIVE AND LYRIC POEMS (FIRST SERIES) FOR USE IN THE LOWER SCHOOL WITH ANNOTATIONS BY O. J. STEVENSON, M.A., D.PAED., Professor of English, Ontario Agricultural College. TORONTO THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED Copyright, Canada, 1912, by THE COPP, CLARK COMPANY, LIMITED, Toronto, Ontario. PREFACE The Narrative and Lyric Poems contained in this volume are those prescribed by the Department of Education for examination for Junior and Senior Public School Diplomas, and for the Senior High School Entrance, and Entrance into the Model Schools. (Circular 58.) In arranging the order of the poems, the Editor has taken into consideration the character of the selections with the object both of grading them in the order of increasing difficulty, and of securing variety in the subjects treated. The teacher may, however, follow his own judgment as to the order in which the poems should be taken up in class. In the annotations the chief points of difficulty have been explained. In the case of a number of the poems, different editions of the poets' works contain different readings. In such cases we have followed the readings that are best known and that have been recognized by the best authorities. CONTENTS The Meeting of the Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moore Jock o' Hazeldean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scott Horatius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Macaulay Alice Brand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scott The Solitary Reaper . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wordsworth The Island of the Scots . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aytoun Dickens in Camp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harte A Musical Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Browning Gradatim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holland The Battle of the Lake Regillus . . . . . . . . Macaulay The Vision of Sir Launfal . . . . . . . . . . . . Lowell The Builders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Longfellow British Freedom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wordsworth The Courtship of Miles Standish . . . . . . . . Longfellow Sohrab and Rustum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arnold NARRATIVE AND LYRIC POEMS THE MEETING OF THE WATERS. There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet! Oh! the last rays of feeling and life must depart Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart. Yet it was not that nature had shed o'er the scene 5 Her purest of crystal and brightest of green; 'Twas not the soft magic of streamlet or hill, Oh! no—it was something more exquisite still. 'Twas that friends, the beloved of my bosom, were near, Who made every dear scene of enchantment more dear, 10 And who felt how the best charms of nature improve, When we see them reflected from looks that we love. Sweet vale of Avoca![1] how calm could I rest In thy bosom of shade with the friends I love best, Where the storms that we feel in this cold world should cease, 15 And our hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in peace! —Moore. [1] Avoca. A valley and river in the County of Wicklow, Ireland. The name signifies "The Meeting of the Waters." JOCK O' HAZELDEAN. "Why weep ye by the tide, ladie? Why weep ye by the tide? I'll wed ye to my youngest son, And ye sall[1] be his bride: And ye sall be his bride, ladie, 5 Sae comely to be seen"— But aye she loot[2] the tears down fa' For Jock o' Hazeldean. "Now let this wilfu' grief be done, And dry that cheek so pale; 10 Young Frank is chief of Errington, And lord of Langley-dale; His step is first in peaceful ha', His sword in battle keen"— But aye she loot the tears down fa' 15 For Jock o' Hazeldean. "A chain of gold ye sall not lack, Nor braid to bind your hair; Nor mettled hound, nor managed[3] hawk, Nor palfrey fresh and fair; 20 And you, the foremost o' them a' Shall ride our forest-queen"— But aye she loot the tears down fa' For Jock o' Hazeldean. The kirk was deck'd at morning-tide, 25 The tapers glimmer'd fair; The priest and bridegroom wait the bride, And dame and knight are there. They sought her baith by bower and ha'. The ladie was not seen! 30 She's o'er the border, and awa' Wi' Jock o' Hazeldean! —Scott [1] sall. shall. [2] loot. let. [3] managed. trained. HORATIUS. A LAY MADE ABOUT THE YEAR OF THE CITY CCCLX. According to legend, Tarquinius Superbus, or Tarquin the Proud, the last of the early kings of Rome, was driven out of the city, partly on account of his own tyranny, and partly because of the misdeeds of his son Sextus Tarquin. The immediate cause of the expulsion of the Tarquins was "the deed of shame," committed by Sextus against Lucretia, the wife of one of the Roman governors. After two unsuccessful attempts to regain the throne, Tarquinius Superbus sought the aid of the Etruscans and Latins, and under the leadership of Lars Porsena, the head of the Etruscan League, the combined forces marched upon Rome. It was then that the incident recorded in the story of Horatius is supposed to have taken place. After the defence of the bridge by Horatius, Lars Porsena laid siege to the city and at last reduced it to submission. He did not, however, insist upon the reinstatement of the Tarquins. A fourth and last attempt was made by Tarquin the Proud to regain the throne, by the aid of his Latin allies, under Mamilius of Tusculum. The story of this expedition forms the subject of The Battle of Lake Regulus. I Lars[1] Porsena of Clusium[2] By the Nine Gods[3] he swore That the great house of Tarquin Should suffer wrong no more. By the Nine Gods he swore it, 5 And named a trysting day,[4] And bade his messengers ride forth, East and west and south and north, To summon his array. II East and west and south and north 10 The messengers ride fast, And tower and town and cottage Have heard the trumpet's blast. Shame on the false Etruscan, Who lingers in his home, 15 When Porsena of Clusium Is on the march to Rome. III The horsemen and the footmen Are pouring in amain From many a stately market-place, 20 From many a fruitful plain, From many a lonely hamlet, Which, hid by beech and pine, Like an eagle's nest, hangs on the crest Of purple Apennine; 25 IV From lordly Volaterrae,[5] Where scowls the far-famed hold Piled by the hands of giants For godlike kings of old; From seagirt Populonia, 30 Whose sentinels descry Sardinia's snowy mountain-tops Fringing the southern sky; V From the proud mart of Pisse,[6] Queen of the western waves, 35 Where ride Massilia's triremes[7] Heavy with fair-haired slaves, From where sweet Olanis[8] wanders Through corn and vines and flowers, From where Cortona lifts to heaven 40 Her diadem of towers. VI Tall are the oaks whose acorns Drop in dark Auser's[9] rill; Fat are the stags that champ the boughs Of the Ciminian hill;[10] 45 Beyond all streams Clitumnus[11] Is to the herdsman dear; Best of all pools the fowler loves The great Volsinian mere.[12] VII But now no stroke of woodman 50 Is heard by Auser's rill; No hunter tracks the stag's green path Up the Ciminian hill; Unwatched along Clitumnus Grazes the milk-white steer; 55 Unharmed the waterfowl may dip In the Volsinian mere. VIII The harvests of Arretium,[13] This year, old men shall reap, This year, young boys in Umbro[14] 60 Shall plunge the struggling sheep; And in the vats of Luna, This year, the must[15] shall foam Round the white feet of laughing girls Whose sires have marched to Rome. IX There be thirty chosen prophets, The wisest of the land, Who alway by Lars Porsena Both morn and evening stand: Evening and morn the Thirty 70 Have turned the verses o'er, Traced from the right[16] on linen white By mighty seers of yore, X And with one voice the Thirty Have their glad answer given: 75 "Go forth, go forth, Lars Porsena; Go forth, beloved of Heaven: Go, and return in glory To Clusium's royal dome; And hang round Nurscia's[17] altars 80 The golden shields[18] of Rome." XI And now hath every city Sent up her tale[19] of men: The foot are fourscore thousand, The horse are thousands ten. 85 Before the gates of Sutrium[20] Is met the great array. A proud man was Lars Porsena Upon the trysting day.