Poems Every Child Should Know - The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library
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Poems Every Child Should Know - The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Poems Every Child Should Know, by Various
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Poems Every Child Should Know  The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library
Author: Various
Editor: Mary E. Burt
Release Date: August 4, 2005 [EBook #16436]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK POEMS EVERY CHILD SHOULD KNOW ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Laura Wisewell and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
CONTENTS
Frontispiece Title page Acknowledgments to Publishers and Authors Preface Contents Index of Authors Part I. Part II. Part III. Part IV. Part V. Part VI. Index of First Lines
When the shadows are long
POEMS
Every Child Should Know
EDITED BY Mary E. Burt
THE WHAT-EVERY-CHILD-SHOULD-KNOW-LIBRARY
Published by
DOUBLEDAY, DORAN & CO., INC.,forTHE PARENTS' INSTITUTE, INC.Publishers of "The Parents' Magazine" 9 EAST 40th STREET, NEW YORK
[View image]
COPYRIGHT. 1904, BY DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES AT THE COUNTRY LIFE PRESS, GARDEN CITY, N.Y.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS TO PUBLISHERS AND AUTHORS
It sometimes happens that there are people who do not know that authors are protected by copyright laws. A publisher once cited to me an instance of a teacher who innocently put forth a little volume of poems that she loved and admired, without asking permission of any one. Her annoyance was boundless when she found that she had no right to the poems.
Special permission has been obtained for each copyrighted poem in this volume, and the right to publish has been purchased of the author or publisher, except in those cases where the author or the publisher has, for reasons of courtesy and friendship, given the permission.
In addition to the business arrangements which have been made, we wish to extend our thanks and acknowledgments to those firms which have so kindly allowed us to use their material.
To HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN& COMPANY, of Boston, we are indebted for the use of the following poems: From the copyrighted works of Longfellow—"The Arrow and the Song," "A Fragment of Hiawatha's Childhood," "The Skeleton in Armour," "The Wreck of theHesperus," "The Ship of State," "The Psalm of Life," "The Village Blacksmith." From Whittier—"Barbara Frietchie" and "TheThree Bellsof Glasgow." From Emerson—"The Problem." From Burroughs—"My Own Shall Come to Me." From Lowell—"The Finding of the Lyre," "The Shepherd of King Admetus," and a fragment of "The Vision of Sir Launfal," From Holmes—"The Chambered Nautilus" and "Old Ironsides." From James T. Fields—"The Captain's Daughter." From Bayard Taylor—"The Song in Camp," From Celia Thaxter—"The Sandpiper." From J. T. Trowbridge—"Farm-Yard Song." From Edith M. Thomas—"The God of Music" and Hermes' "Moly."
To CHARLESSCRIBNER'SSONSwe are indebted for the use of the following poems: From the copyrighted works of Eugene Field—"Wynken Blynken, and Nod," "Krinken," and "The Duel." From Robert Louis Stevenson—"My Shadow." From James Whitcomb Riley's poems—"Little Orphant Annie." From the poems of Sidney Lanier— "Barnacles" and "The Tournament." From "The Poems of Patriotism"—"Sheridan's Ride."
We are further indebted to CHARLESSCRIBNER'SSONS, as well as to MR. GEORGEW. CABLE, for "The New Arrival," taken from "The Cable Story Book," and to MRS. KATHERINEMILLERandScribner's Magazinefor "Stevenson's Birthday."
To J. B. LIPPINCOTTCOMPANYwe are indebted for the use of "Sheridan's Ride," from the complete works of T. Buchanan Read.
To HARPER& BROTHERSfor the use of "Driving Home the Cows," by Kate Putnam Osgood.
To LITTLE, BROWN& COMPANY, of Boston, "How the Leaves Came Down," by Susan Coolidge.
To the WHITAKER& RAYCOMPANY, of San Francisco, "Columbus," by Joaquin Miller, from his complete works published and copyrighted bythat company.
To D. APPLETON& COMPANYfor "The Planting of the Apple-Tree" and "Robert of Lincoln," from the complete works of William Cullen Bryant; also for "Marco Bozzaris," from the works of Fitz-Greene Halleck.
To the MACMILLANCOMPANYfor "The Forsaken Merman," by Matthew Arnold, from the complete volume of his poems published by that company.
To the HOWARDUNIVERSITYPRINT, Washington, D.C., for Jeremiah Rankin's little poem, "The Babie," from "Ingleside Rhaims."
To the heirs of MARYEMILYBRADLEYfor "A Chrysalis."
To HENRYHOLCOMBBENNETTfor "The Flag Goes By."
PREFACE
Is this another collection of stupid poems that children cannot use? Will they look hopelessly through this volume for poems that suit them? Will they say despairingly, "This is too long," and "That is too hard," and "I don't like that because it is not interesting"?
Are there three or four pleasing poems and are all the rest put in to fill up the book? Nay, verily! The poems in this collection are those that children love. With the exception of seven, they are short enough for children to commit to memory without wearying themselves or losing interest in the poem. If one boy learns "TheOverland Mail," or "The Recruit," or "Wynken, Blynken, and Nod," or "The Song in Camp," or "Old Ironsides," or "I Have a Little Shadow," or "The Tournament," or "The Duel," nine boys out of ten will be eager to follow him. I know because I have tried it a dozen times. Every boy loves "Paul Revere's Ride" (alas! I have not been able to include it), and is ambitious to learn it, but only boys having a quick memory will persevere to the end. Shall the slower boy be deprived of the pleasure of reading the whole poem and getting its inspiring sentiment and learning as many stanzas as his mind will take? No, indeed. Half of such a poem is better than none. Let the slow boy learn and recite as many stanzas as he can and the boy of quick memory follow him up with the rest. It does not help the slow boy's memory to keep it down entirely or deprive it of its smaller activity because he cannot learn the whole. Some people will invariably give the slow child a very short poem. It is often better to divide a long poem among the children, letting each child learn a part. The sustained interest of a long poem is worth while. "The Merman," "The Battle of Ivry," "Horatius at the Bridge," "Krinken," "The Skeleton in Armour," "The Raven" and "Hervé Riel" may all profitably be learned that way. Nevertheless, the child enjoys most the poem that is just long enough, and there is much to be said in favour of the selection that is adapted, in length, to the average mind; for the child hesitates in the presence of quantity rather than in the presence of subtle thought. I make claim for this collection that it is made up of poems that the majority of children will learn of their own free will. There are people who believe that in the matter of learning poetry there is no "ought," but this is a false belief. There is aduty, even there; for every American citizenoughtto know the great national songs that keep alive the spirit of patriotism. Children should build for their future—and get, while they are children, what only the fresh imagination of the child can assimilate.
They should store up an untold wealth of heroic sentiment; they should acquire the habit of carrying a literary quality in their conversation; they should carry a heart full of the fresh and delightful associations and memories, connected with poetry hours to brighten mature years. They should develop their memories while they have memories to develop.
Will the boy who took every poetry hour for a whole school year to learn "Henry of Navarre" ever regret it, or will the children who listened to it? No. It was fresh every week and they brought fresh interest in listening. The boy will always love it because he used to love it. There were boys who scrambled for the right to recite "The Tournament," "The Charge of the Light Brigade," "The Star-Spangled Banner," and so on. The boy who was first to reach the front had the privilege. The triumph of getting the chance to recite added to the zest of it. Will they ever forget it?
I know Lowell's "The Finding of the Lyre." Attention, Sir Knights! See who can learn it first as I say it to you. But I find that I have forgotten a line of it, so you may open your books and teach it to me. Now, I can recite every word of it. How much of it can you repeat from memory? One boy can say it all. Nearly every child has learned the most of it. Now, it will be easy for you to learn it alone. And Memory, the Goddess Beautiful, will henceforth go with you to recall this happy hour.
MARYE. BURT. The John A. Browning School, 1904.
CONTENTS
PART I
1. The Arrow and the Song HENRYW. LONGFELLOW 2. The Babie JEREMIAHEAMESRANKIN 3. Let Dogs Delight to Bark and Bite ISAACWATTS 4. Little Things EBENEZERCOBHAMBREWER 5. He Prayeth Best SAMUELT. COLERIDGE 6. Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star ANONYMOUS 7. Pippa ROBERTBROWNING 8. The Days of the Month ANOLDSONG 9. True Royalty RUDYARDKIPLING 10. Playing Robinson Crusoe RUDYARDKIPLING 11. My Shadow ROBERTLOUISSTEVENSON 12. Little White Lily GEORGEMACDONALD 13. How the Leaves Came Down SUSANCOOLIDGE 14. Willie Winkie WILLIAMMILLER 15. The Owl and the Pussy-Cat EDWARDLEAR 16. Wynken, Blynken, and Nod EUGENEFIELD 17. The Duel EUGENEFIELD 18. The Boy Who Never Told a Lie ANONYMOUS 19. Love Between Brothers and Sisters ISAACWATTS 20. The Bluebell of Scotland ANONYMOUS 21. If I Had But Two Little Wings SAMUELT. COLERIDGE 22. A Farewell CHARLESKINGSLEY 23. Casabianca FELICIAHEMANS 24. The Captain's Daughter JAMEST. FIELDS 25. The Village Blacksmith HENRYW. LONGFELLOW 26. Sweet and Low ALFREDTENNYSON 27. The Violet JANETAYLOR 28. The Rainbow (a fragment) WILLIAMWORDSWORTH 29. A Visit From St. Nicholas CLEMENTCLARKEMOORE
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30. The Star-Spangled Banner FRANCISSCOTTKEY 31. Father William LEWISCARROLL 32. The Nightingale and the Glow-worm WILLIAMCOWPER
33. The Frost HANNAHFLAGGGOULD 34. The Owl ALFREDTENNYSON 35. Little Billee WILLIAMMAKEPEACETHACKERAY 36. The Butterfly and the Bee WILLIAMLISLEBOWLES 37. An Incident of the French Camp ROBERTBROWNING 38. Robert of Lincoln WILLIAMCULLENBRYANT 39. Old Grimes ALBERTGORTONGREENE 40. Song of Life CHARLESMACKAY 41. Fairy Song JOHNKEATS 42. A Boy's Song JAMESHOGG 43. Buttercups and Daisies MARYHOWITT 44. The Rainbow THOMASCAMPBELL 45. Old Ironsides OLIVERWENDELLHOLMES 46. Little Orphant Annie JAMESWHITCOMBRILEY 47. O Captain! My Captain! WALTWHITMAN 48. Ingratitude WILLIAMSHAKESPEARE 49. The Ivy Green CHARLESDICKENS 50. The Noble Nature BENJONSON 51. The Flying Squirrel MARYE. BURT 52. Warren's Address JOHNPIERPONT 53. The Song in Camp BAYARDTAYLOR 54. The Bugle Song ALFREDTENNYSON 55. TheThree Bellsof Glasgow JOHNG. WHITTIER 56. Sheridan's Ride THOMASBUCHANANREAD 57. The Sandpiper CELIATHAXTER 58. Lady Clare ALFREDTENNYSON 59. The Lord of Burleigh ALFREDTENNYSON 60. Hiawatha's Childhood
PART II
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HENRYW. LONGFELLOW 61. I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud WILLIAMWORDSWORTH 62. John Barleycorn ROBERTBURNS 63. A Life on the Ocean Wave EPESSARGENT 64. The Death of the Old Year ALFREDTENNYSON 65. Abou Ben Adhem LEIGHHUNT 66. Farm-Yard Song J.T. TROWBRIDGE 67. To a Mouse ROBERTBURNS 68. To a Mountain Daisy ROBERTBURNS 69. Barbara Frietchie JOHNG. WHITTIER
PART III
70. Lochinvar SIRWALTERSCOTT 71. Lord Ullin's Daughter THOMASCAMPBELL 72. The Charge of the Light Brigade ALFREDTENNYSON 73. The Tournament SIDNEYLANIER 74. The Wind and the Moon GEORGEMACDONALD 75. Jesus the Carpenter CATHERINEC. LIDDELL 76. Letty's Globe CHARLESTENNYSONTURNER 77. A Dream WILLIAMBLAKE 78. Heaven Is Not Reached at a Single Bound J. G. HOLLAND 79. The Battle of Blenheim ROBERTSOUTHEY 80. Fidelity WILLIAMWORDSWORTH 81. The Chambered Nautilus OLIVERWENDELLHOLMES 82. Crossing the Bar ALFREDTENNYSON 83. The Overland-Mail RUDYARDKIPLING 84. Gathering Song of Donald Dhu SIRWALTERSCOTT 85. Marco Bozzaris FITZ-GREENEHALLECK 86. The Death of Napoleon ISAACMCCLELLAN 87. How Sleep the Brave WILLIAMCOLLINS 88. The Flag Goes By HENRYHOLCOMBBENNETT 89. Hohenlinden THOMASCAMPBELL 90. My Old Kentucky Home STEPHENCOLLINSFOSTER
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91. Old Folks at Home STEPHENCOLLINSFOSTER 92. The Wreck of theHesperusHENRYW. LONGFELLOW 93. Bannockburn ROBERTBURNS
PART IV
94. The Inchcape Rock ROBERTSOUTHEY 95. The Finding of the Lyre JAMESRUSSELLLOWELL 96. A Chrysalis MARYEMILYBRADLEY 97. For a' That ROBERTBURNS 98. The New Arrival GEORGEW. CABLE 99. The Brook ALFREDTENNYSON 100. The Ballad of theClampherdownRUDYARDKIPLING 101. The Destruction of Sennacherib LORDBYRON 102. I Remember, I Remember THOMASHOOD 103. Driving Home the Cows KATEPUTNAMOSGOOD 104. Krinken EUGENEFIELD 105. Stevenson's Birthday KATHERINEMILLER 106. A Modest Wit SELLECKOSBORNE 107. The Legend of Bishop Hatto ROBERTSOUTHEY 108. Columbus JOAQUINMILLER 109. The Shepherd of King Admetus JAMESRUSSELLLOWELL 110. How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix ROBERTBROWNING 111. The Burial of Sir John Moore at Corunna C. WOLFE 112. The Eve of Waterloo LORDBYRON 113. Ivry THOMASB. MACAULAY 114. The Glove and the Lions LEIGHHUNT 115. The Well of St. Keyne ROBERTSOUTHEY 116. The Nautilus and the Ammonite ANONYMOUS 117. The Solitude of Alexander Selkirk WILLIAMCOWPER 118. The Homes of England FELICIAHEMANS 119. Horatius at the Bridge THOMASB. MACAULAY 120. The Planting of the Apple-Tree WILLIAMCULLENBRYANT
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121. June JAMESRUSSELLLOWELL 122. A Psalm of Life HENRYW. LONGFELLOW 123. Barnacles SIDNEYLANIER 124. A Happy Life SIRHENRYWOTTON 125. Home, Sweet Home JOHNHOWARDPAYNE 126. From Casa Guidi Windows ELIZABETHBARRETTBROWNING 127. Woodman, Spare That Tree! GEORGEPOPEMORRIS 128. Abide With Me HENRYFRANCISLYTE 129. Lead, Kindly Light JOHNHENRYNEWMAN 130. The Last Rose of Summer THOMASMOORE 131. Annie Laurie WILLIAMDOUGLAS 132. The Ship of State HENRYW. LONGFELLOW 133. America SAMUELFRANCISSMITH 134. The Landing of the Pilgrims FELICIAHEMANS 135. The Lotos-Eaters ALFREDTENNYSON 136. Moly EDITHM. THOMAS 137. Cupid Drowned LEIGHHUNT 138. Cupid Stung THOMASMOORE 139. Cupid and My Campasbe JOHNLYLY 140. A Ballad for a Boy ANONYMOUS 141. The Skeleton in Armour HENRYW. LONGFELLOW 142. TheRevengeALFREDTENNYSON 143. Sir Galahad ALFREDTENNYSON 144. A Name in the Sand HANNAHFLAGGGOULD
145. The Voice of Spring FELICIAHEMANS 146. The Forsaken Merman MATTHEWARNOLD 147. The Banks o' Doon ROBERTBURNS 148. The Light of Other Days THOMASMOORE 149. My Own Shall Come to Me JOHNBURROUGHS 150. Ode to a Skylark
PART V
PART VI
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