Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett - With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes
124 Pages
English
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Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett - With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes

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124 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett, by Samuel Johnson, ThomasParnell, Thomas Gray, and Tobias SmollettThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, and ExplanatoryNotesAuthor: Samuel Johnson, Thomas Parnell, Thomas Gray, and Tobias SmollettRelease Date: February 24, 2004 [EBook #11254]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK POETICAL WORKS ***Produced by Jonathan Ingram, Jayam Subramanian and PG Distributed ProofreadersTHEPOETICAL WORKSOFJOHNSON, PARNELL, GRAY,ANDSMOLLETT.With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, andExplanatory NotesBY THE REV. GEORGE GILFILLAN. EDINBURGHM.DCCC.LV.CONTENTS.JOHNSON'S POEMS. The Life of Samuel Johnson London: a Poem in imitation of the Third Satire of Juvenal, 1738 The Vanity of Human Wishes. In imitation of the Tenth Satire of JuvenalPROLOGUES:— Prologue Spoken by Mr Garrick, at the Opening of the Theatre-Royal, Drury-Lane, 1747 Prologue Spoken by Mr Garrick before the 'Masque of Comus', acted for the benefit of Milton's Grand-daughter Prologue to Goldsmith's Comedy of 'The Good-Natured Man', 1769 Prologue to the Comedy of 'A Word ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett, by Samuel Johnson, Thomas Parnell, Thomas Gray, and Tobias Smollett This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes Author: Samuel Johnson, Thomas Parnell, Thomas Gray, and Tobias Smollett Release Date: February 24, 2004 [EBook #11254] Language: English *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK POETICAL WORKS *** Produced by Jonathan Ingram, Jayam Subramanian and PG Distributed Proofreaders THE POETICAL WORKS OF JOHNSON, PARNELL, GRAY, AND SMOLLETT. With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes BY THE REV. GEORGE GILFILLAN. EDINBURGH M.DCCC.LV. CONTENTS. JOHNSON'S POEMS. The Life of Samuel Johnson London: a Poem in imitation of the Third Satire of Juvenal, 1738 The Vanity of Human Wishes. In imitation of the Tenth Satire of Juvenal PROLOGUES:— Prologue Spoken by Mr Garrick, at the Opening of the Theatre-Royal, Drury-Lane, 1747 Prologue Spoken by Mr Garrick before the 'Masque of Comus', acted for the benefit of Milton's Grand-daughter Prologue to Goldsmith's Comedy of 'The Good-Natured Man', 1769 Prologue to the Comedy of 'A Word to the Wise,' spoken by Mr Hull ODES:— Spring Midsummer Autumn Winter MISCELLANEOUS:— The Winter's Walk To Miss ***** on her giving the Author a Gold and Silk Network Purse of her own Weaving Epigram on George II. and Colley Cibber, Esq. Stella in Mourning To Stella Verses Written at the Request of a Gentleman to whom a Lady had given a Sprig of Myrtle To Lady Firebrace, at Bury Assizes To Lycè, an Elderly Lady On the Death of Mr Robert Levett, a Practiser in Physic Epitaph on Claude Phillips, an Itinerant Musician Epitaph on Sir Thomas Hanmer, Bart. On the Death of Stephen Grey, F.R.S., the Electrician To Miss Hickman, Playing on the Spinnet Paraphrase of Proverbs, chap. iv. verses 6-11 Horace, Lib. iv. Ode vii. Translated On Seeing a Bust of Mrs Montague Anacreon, Ode Ninth Lines Written in Ridicule of certain Poems published in 1777 Parody of a Translation from the 'Medea' of Euripides Burlesque on the Modern Versification of Ancient Legendary Tales: an Impromptu Epitaph for Mr Hogarth Translation of the Two First Stanzas of the Song 'Rio Verde, Rio Verde', printed in Bishop Percy's 'Reliques of Ancient English Poetry': an Impromptu To Mrs Thrale, on her Completing her Thirty-Fifth Year: a Impromptu Impromptu Translation of an Air in the 'Clemenza de Tito' of Metastasia, beginning 'Deh! se Piacermi Vuoi' Lines Written under a Print representing Persons Skaiting Translation of a Speech of Aquileio in the 'Adriano' of Metastasio, beginning, 'Tu Che in Corte Invecchiasti' Impromptu on Hearing Miss Thrale Consulting with a Friend about a Gown and Hat she was inclined to Wear Translation of Virgil, Pastoral I Translation of Horace, Book i. Ode xxii. Translation of Horace, Book ii. Ode ix. Translation of part of the Dialogue between Hector and Andromache.—From the Sixth Book of Homer's Iliad To Miss * * * * on her Playing upon a Harpsichord in a Room hung with Flower-Pieces of her own Painting Evening: an Ode. To Stella To the Same To a Friend To a Young Lady, on her Birthday Epilogue intended to have been Spoken by a Lady who was to personate 'The Ghost of Hermione' The Young Author Friendship: an Ode. Printed in the Gentleman's Magazine, 1743 Imitation of the Style of Percy One and Twenty PARNELL'S POEMS. The Life and Poetry of Thomas Parnell Hesiod; or, the Rise of Woman Song Song Song Anacreontic Anacreontic A Fairy Tale, in the Ancient English Style To Mr Pope Health: an Eclogue The Flies: an Eclogue An Elegy to an Old Beauty The Book-Worm An Allegory on Man An Imitation of some French Verses A Night-Piece on Death A Hymn to Contentment The Hermit GRAY'S POEMS. The Life and Poetry of Thomas Gray ODES:— I. On the Spring II. On the Death of a Favorite Cat III. On a distant Prospect of Eton College IV. To Adversity V. The Progress of Poesy VI. The Bard VII. The Fatal Sisters VIII. The Descent of Odin IX. The Death of Hoel X. The Triumph of Owen XI. For Music MISCELLANEOUS:— A Long Story Elegy written in a Country Churchyard Epitaph on Mrs Jane Clarke Stanzas, suggested by a View of the Seat and Ruins at Kingsgate, in Kent, 1766 Translation from Statius Gray on himself SMOLLETT'S POEMS. The Life of Tobias Smollett Advice: a Satire Reproof: a Satire The Tears of Scotland. Written in the year 1746 Verses on a Young Lady playing on a Harpsichord and Singing Love Elegy, in imitation of Tibullus Burlesque Ode Ode to Mirth Ode to Sleep Ode to Leven Water Ode to Blue-Eyed Ann Ode to Independence Songs THE POETICAL WORKS OF SAMUEL JOHNSON. THE LIFE OF SAMUEL JOHNSON. We feel considerable trepidation in beginning a life of Johnson, not so much on account of the magnitude of the man—for in Milton, and one or two others, we have already met his match—but on account of the fact that the field has been so thoroughly exhausted by former writers. It is in the shadow of Boswell, the best of all biographers, and not in that of Johnson, that we feel ourselves at present cowering. Yet we must try to give a rapid account of the leading incidents in Johnson's life, as well as a short estimate of his vast, rugged genius. Samuel Johnson was born at Lichfield, Staffordshire, on the 18th of September 1709, and was baptized the same day. His father was Michael Johnson, a bookseller and stationer, and his mother, Sarah Ford. Samuel was the first-born of the family. Nathaniel, who died in his twenty-fifth year, was the second and the last. Johnson very early began to manifest both his peculiar prejudices and his peculiar powers. When a mere child, we see him in Lichfield Cathedral, perched on his father's shoulders, gazing at Sacheverel, the famous Tory preacher. We hear him, about the same time, roaring to his mother, who had given him, a minute before, a collect in the Common Prayer-Book to get by heart as his day's task, —"Mother, I can say it already!" His first teacher, Dame Oliver, a widow, thought him, as she well might, the best scholar she ever had. From her he passed into the hands of one Tom Brown, an original, who once published a spelling-book, and dedicated it "to the Universe!"—without permission, we presume. He began to learn Latin first with a Mr Hawkins, and then with a Mr Hunter, head-master of Lichfield,—a petty tyrant, although a good scholar, under whom, to use Gay's language, Johnson was "Lash'd into Latin