Practical Pointers for Patentees
129 Pages
English

Practical Pointers for Patentees

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Published 08 December 2010
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Language English
Project Gutenberg's Practical Pointers for Patentees, by Franklin Cresee
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Practical Pointers for Patentees
Author: Franklin Cresee
Release Date: September 20, 2007 [EBook #22683]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK PRACTICAL POINTERS FOR PATENTEES ***
Produced by Joe Longo and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
A GOOD PATENT, PROPERLY HANDLED, IS A STEPPING STONE TO SUCCESS AND FORTUNE.
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O N T A I N I N G V A L U A N D A D V I C E O N O F P A T E N T S
A N E L U C I E M P L O Y E I N V E N T O R
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D A T I O N O F T H EB E S T M D B Y T H E M O S TS U C C E S S I N H A N D L I N GT H E I R I
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Revised and Corrected, with New Forms and Tables of Population of the United States in Accordance with the 1910 Census
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M U N N I &N C. C I E N T I F I C AM E R I C A N3 6 1 B r o N E WY O R K 1 9 1 2
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Copyright, 1901, by the POTOMAC PUBLISHING COMPANY
Copyright, 1902, by MUNN & COMPANY
Copyright, 1906, by MUNN & COMPANY
Copyright, 1912, by MUNN & CO., INC.
New York MACGOWAN& SLIPPER 30 Beekman Street
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The original conception and working out of an invention is usually a labor of love on the part of the inventor: having perfected his invention in every detail, he finds able and skilled counsel waiting to prepare and prosecute his application for patent before the Patent Office Examiner. When the patent is allowed or issued, the patentee's real work begins—that of turning the patent into money. This is the business end of the inventor's work, which is generally to his interest financially to undertake himself, or to have under his immediate supervision.
The object of this little work, based upon the experience and observation of the author and other successful inventors, is to gi ve the patentee such information and advice as will enable him to proceed more intelligently, on the most successful and economical basis, to realize from his invention.
The American Government issues annually over thirty-five thousand patents, a large number of which are offered for sale by their respective patentees, who in many cases have no definite lines to pursue in negotiating their patents; many realizing little or nothing from their inventions through careless or bad management, while others, through incompetency, drift into the hands of unscrupulous patent-selling agents only to be swindled.
The numerous inquiries from patentees seeking practical, reliable, and up-to-date information as to the best and most successful methods of realizing from the product of their ingenuity, has led the author, after due deliberation, to prepare and present this work to the American inventor, with a view of supplying a long-felt want, with the hope that it w ill save them many expensive experiments in handling their patents, and advance them on the road to success.
It has been the endeavor of the writer to cover briefly every subject that is usually encountered by patentees in disposing of their patents, not only in the matter of selling, but also in the equally important and perplexing questions of arriving at the value of patents, legal forms, statistics, etc., etc.
Realizing that the work may be deficient in many respects, the hope that it will prove instructive, and the belief that it contains many practical pointers for patentees is still entertained by
THE AUTHOR.
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Monopoly in Patents—Industrial Progress Based upon the Patent System
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Danger in an Undivided Interest—A Better Plan —F orm of Agreement—Perfecting Inventions — E x h i b i t of Inventions—To Avoid Being "Squeezed"—Value of Record of Invention —Newspaper Notoriety
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Patent-selling Agencies—The Best Selling A g e n t — I n Case the Patentee Cannot Undertake the Selling—Methods of Selling Patents—About Advertising—How to Write an Advertisement—Correspondence as a Means of Bringing Patents before Interested Parties —How to Correspond with Manufacturers —Circulars—Illustrations—About Getting up Circulars—Copies of Patents, How to Secure —Uses of Printed Copies—First Impressions All—important—Value of Models—Working Drawings
C H A P T E R INCOME FROM INVENTIONS. Independence through Successful Invention —U nprofitable Patents—Money in Patents —Business Capacity of the Inventor —Inventions as a Poor Man's Opportunity to Advance
C H A P T E R HOW TO CONDUCT THE SALE OF PATENTS.
C H A P T E R DEMAND FOR INVENTIONS OF MERIT.
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C H A P T E R I HOW TO ARRIVE AT THE VALUE OF A PATENT.
C H A P T SECURING CAPITAL.
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Pecuniary Value—Commercial Value—Basis for Estimation—General Rules for Valuation —How Rating for Royalty Is Figured—Stock in Stock Companies—Prices for Territorial Rights—Valuation Tables
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Map of the United States—Official Census of the U n i t e d States by Counties for 1910 —Population of Cities of the United States —Number, Acreage and Value of Farms, by States—Table of Occupations106-141 INDEX142-146
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C H A P T E DECISIONS AND NOTES.
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About Canadian Patents—Selling Canadian Patents— Population of Canadian Cities
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Value of Personal Influence—Personal S o l i c i t a t i o n Advisable—Selling Outright —Assigning an Undivided Interest—Dividing a Patent into Different Classes of Rights —Granting Licenses—Placing upon Royalty —Manufacturing and Forming Companies —To Organize Stock Companies—Trading as a Last Resort
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C H A P T E R THE TRANSFER OF PATENT RIGHTS.
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C H A P T E TABLES AND STATISTICS.
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C H A P T E R V I HOW TO CONDUCT THE SALE OF PATENTS.—Continued
Assignments—Territorial Grants—Licenses — P a t e n t Title—Rules of Practice — A s s i g n m e n t s — A s s i g n e e s — Grantees —Mortgages—Licensees—Must be Recorded— Conditional Assignments—State Laws on Selling Patents
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Assignee, Grantee, and Licensee Defined—The L a n g u a g e of Law—Assignment of Entire Interest in Letters Patent—Assignment of an Undivided Interest—Grant of a Territorial Interest—License; Shop Right—License; Non-exclusive, with Royalty—License; Exclusive, with Royalty
C H A P T E CANADIAN PATENTS.
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