Practical Taxidermy - A manual of instruction to the amateur in collecting, preserving, and setting up natural history specimens of all kinds. To which is added a chapter upon the pictorial arrangement of museums. With additional instructions in modelling and artistic taxidermy.
135 Pages
English
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Practical Taxidermy - A manual of instruction to the amateur in collecting, preserving, and setting up natural history specimens of all kinds. To which is added a chapter upon the pictorial arrangement of museums. With additional instructions in modelling and artistic taxidermy.

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135 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Practical Taxidermy, by Montagu BrowneThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Practical TaxidermyA manual of instruction to the amateur in collecting,preserving, and setting up natural history specimens ofall kinds. To which is added a chapter upon the pictorialarrangement of museums. With additional instructions inmodelling and artistic taxidermy.Author: Montagu BrowneRelease Date: July 9, 2008 [EBook #26014]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK PRACTICAL TAXIDERMY ***Produced by Jon RichfieldPRACTICAL TAXIDERMYAMANUAL OF INSTRUCTION TO THE AMATEURIN COLLECTING, PRESERVING, ANDSETTING UP NATURAL HISTORY SPECIMENS OF ALL KINDS.TO WHICH IS ADDED A CHAPTER UPONTHE PICTORIAL ARRANGEMENT OF MUSEUMS.ILLUSTRATED.BYMONTAGU BROWNE, F.Z.S., etc..,Curator, Town Museum, Leicester.-------------SECOND EDITION,Revised and considerably Enlarged,With additional Instructions in Modelling and Artistic Taxidermy.--------------LONDON:L. UPCOTT GILL, BAZAAR BUILDINGS, DRURY LANE, W.C.(FORMERLY OF 170, STRAND).NEW YORK:CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS, 153-157, FIFTH AVENUE.images/Image24.gifPlate I Peregrine Falcon on FlightShowing Method of Binding etc..Frontispiece — see chapter VLONDON:L. UPCOTT ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Practical Taxidermy, by Montagu Browne This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Practical Taxidermy A manual of instruction to the amateur in collecting, preserving, and setting up natural history specimens of all kinds. To which is added a chapter upon the pictorial arrangement of museums. With additional instructions in modelling and artistic taxidermy. Author: Montagu Browne Release Date: July 9, 2008 [EBook #26014] Language: English *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK PRACTICAL TAXIDERMY *** Produced by Jon Richfield PRACTICAL TAXIDERMY A MANUAL OF INSTRUCTION TO THE AMATEUR IN COLLECTING, PRESERVING, AND SETTING UP NATURAL HISTORY SPECIMENS OF ALL KINDS. TO WHICH IS ADDED A CHAPTER UPON THE PICTORIAL ARRANGEMENT OF MUSEUMS. ILLUSTRATED. BY MONTAGU BROWNE, F.Z.S., etc.., Curator, Town Museum, Leicester. ------------- SECOND EDITION, Revised and considerably Enlarged, With additional Instructions in Modelling and Artistic Taxidermy. -------------- LONDON: L. UPCOTT GILL, BAZAAR BUILDINGS, DRURY LANE, W.C. (FORMERLY OF 170, STRAND). NEW YORK: CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS, 153-157, FIFTH AVENUE. images/Image24.gifPlate I Peregrine Falcon on Flight Showing Method of Binding etc.. Frontispiece — see chapter V LONDON: L. UPCOTT GILL, LONDON AND COUNTY PRINTING WORKS, BAZAAR BUILDINGS. W.C. CONTENTS. Plate I Peregrine Falcon on Flight * PRACTICAL TAXIDERMY * PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION. * CHAPTER I. THE RISE AND PROGRESS of TAXIDERMY. * CHAPTER II. DECOYING AND TRAPPING ANIMALS. * Fig. 1 — Loop in wire. * Fig. 2 — "SPRINGE," OR SNARE FOR BIRDS. * Fig. 3 — "Springe" FOR SNIPE. * Fig. 4 — "FIGURE of 4" TRAP. * Fig. 5 — PLAN AND METHOD OF SETTING CLAP-NET. * Fig. 6, 7 & 8 — "Play-stick" parts * Fig. 9 — "FLUR" OR "PLAY-STICK." * Fig. 10 — DECOY WHISTLE FOR THRUSHES, etc.. * CHAPTER III. NECESSARY TOOLS. * Fig. 11, 12, 13 — SKINNING KNIVES. * Fig. 14 — SCISSORS, No 1. pattern. * Fig. 15 — SCISSORS, No 2. pattern. * Fig. 16. — Bell-hangers' Pliers. * Fig. 17 — Cutting nippers. * Fig. 18 — French Cutting Nippers * Fig. 19 — Feather Pliers * Fig. 20 — Tow Forceps * Fig. 21 — Stuffing Iron * CHAPTER IV. PRESERVATIVE SOAPS, POWDERS, ETC. * Plate II Skeleton of Peregrine Falcon * CHAPTER V. SKINNING AND PRESERVING BIRDS. * Fig. 22 — Starling — Showing Position of First Incision and the Commencement of the Removal of the Skin * Fig. 23 — Skin of Bird Turned Ready for Severance from Body * Fig. 24 — "Set" or Drying Board for Birds' Skins. * Fig. 25 — Starling Properly Made Into a Skin With Label Attached. * CHAPTER VI. SKINNING AND PRESERVING MAMMALS. * Plate III Skeleton of Otter * Fig. 26 — SKULL OF HORNED HEAD, BLOCKED READY FOR MOUNTING. * Fig. 27 — Neck-board for skin of head. * CHAPTER VII. MODELLING OF ANIMALS BY SUBSTITUTION OF CLAY, COMPOSITION, PLASTER CASTS, OR WAX FOR LOOSE STUFFING. * Fig. 28 — Stag's head in plaster from clay model. * Fig. 29 — Steel "undercutting" tool. * Fig. 30 — Steel "relieving" tool. * Fig. 31 — Back view of model with neck block inserted. * Fig. 32 — False body of wood, with neck and tail wires attached. * Fig. 33 — Section of half-inch board to represent ribs * Plate IV. Lion mounted from the "Flat". * CHAPTER VIII. SKINNING, PRESERVING, AND MOUNTING FISH, AND CASTING FISHES IN PLASTER, etc.. * Fig. 34 — Diagram of pike, showing skin removed on one side from lower half of body. * CHAPTER IX. SKINNING, PRESERVING, AND MOUNTING REPTILES. * CHAPTER X. DRESSING AND SOFTENING SKINS OR FURS AS LEATHER. * Fig. 35 — Scraper with which to dress skins. * CHAPTER XI RELAXING AND CLEANING SKINS — "MAKING-UP" FROM PIECES. * CHAPTER XII Colouring Bills And Feet Of Birds, Bare Skin Of Mammals, Fishes, Etc. — Restoring Shrunken Parts By A Wax Process — Drying And Colouring Ferns Grasses, Seaweeds, Etc. — "Piece Moulds," And Modelling Fruit In Plaster — Preserving Spiders — Making Skeletons Of Animals, Skeleton Leaves Etc. — Polishing Horns, Shells, Etc. — Egg Collecting And Preserving — Additional Formulae, Etc. * Fig. 36 — Blow-pipe for inflating larvae * Fig. 37 — Climbing iron * CHAPTER XIII. CASES, MOUNTS, SHIELDS, EGG CABINETS, ROCKWORK, FERNS, GRASSES, SEA-WEEDS, ETC., FOR "FITTING UP." * Fig. 38 — Plan of "canted-corner" case. * Fig. 39 — Section of "uprights" or pillars of square case. * Fig. 40 — Mitre block. * CHAPTER XIV. GENERAL REMARKS ON ARTISTIC "MOUNTING," MODELLED FOLIAGE, SCREENS, LAMPS, NATURAL HISTORY JEWELLERY, ETC. * CHAPTER XV. COLLECTING AND PRESERVING INSECTS. * Fig. 41 — Plan of "ring" net. * Fig. 42 — "Ring "-net complete. * Fig. 43 — The "Hill sliding net," open. * Fig. 44 — The "Hill sliding net," closed. * Fig. 45 — The "Hill sliding net" ready for use. * Fig. 46 — "Sugaring" net. * Fig. 47 — Section of "Setting Board" * Fig. 48 — Butterfly "braced" on board. * Fig. 49 — Section of division strips. * Fig. 50 — Front of setting-board box, with flaps open. * Fig. 51 — Sugaring can. * Fig. 52 — Impaler. * Fig. 53 — Diaphragm bottle. * Fig. 54 — Sugaring drum. * Fig. 55 — Assembling cage. * Fig. 56 — Cage for collecting larvae. * Fig. 57 — Insect breeding cage * CHAPTER XVI. ON NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUMS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO A NEW SYSTEM OF PICTORIAL ARRANGEMENT OF VERTEBRATES. * Plate V. Arrangements of vertebrates in Zoological Room. * Fig. 58 — Projected arrangement of a biological collection by "Scheme A." * Scanner's remarks. * PRACTICAL TAXIDERMY PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION. THE First Edition of "Practical Taxidermy" having now run through the press — with, I venture to hope, some profit to students of the art, if I may judge from the many hundreds of letters I have from time to time received — the publishers have invited me to revise such parts of the work as may be expedient, and also to add many technical methods of modelling animals an artistic manner. I do this the more readily because of the narrow way in which most professional Taxidermists bolster up their art in a secret and entirely unnecessary manner — unnecessary because amateur can, but by the severest application, possibly compete with the experience of the technical or professional worker. No pictorial artist ever pretends he has a special brush or colours with which he can paint landscapes or sea pieces at will; he knows that only thorough mastery of the technicalities of his art - supplemented by wide experience and close application - enables him to succeed as he does, and to delight people who, seeing his facility of handling, may imagine that picture painting is very easy and could be readily acquired — perhaps from books. So it is with the Taxidermist. Those, therefore, who procure this book, thinking to do all attempted to be explained therein without long study and without a knowledge of anatomy, form, arrangement, and colour, may put it on one side as useless. These pages are merely an introduction to a delightful art, which must be wooed with patient