Queechy, Volume I
671 Pages
English
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Queechy, Volume I

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671 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Queechy, Volume I, by Elizabeth WetherellThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.orgTitle: Queechy, Volume IAuthor: Elizabeth WetherellRelease Date: June 26, 2006 [eBook #18690]Language: English***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK QUEECHY, VOLUME I***Susan Warner (1819-1885), Queechy (1852), Tauchnitz edition 1854Produced by Daniel FROMONTCOLLECTIONOFBRITISH AUTHORSTAUCHNITZ EDITION.VOL. 311QUEECHY. BY ELIZABETH WETHERELL .IN TWO VOLUMES.VOL. I.TAUCHNITZ EDITIONby the same author,THE WIDE WIDE WORLD 1 vol.THE HILLS OF THE SHATEMUC 2 vols.SAY AND SEAL 2 vols.THE OLD HELMET 2 vols.QUEECHY.BYELIZABETH WETHERELLAUTHOR OF "THE WIDE, WIDE WORLD."IN TWO VOLUMES.AUTHOR'S EDITION.IN TWO VOLUMESVOL. ILEIPZIGBERNHARD TAUCHNITZ1854"I hope I may speak of woman without offence to the ladies."THE GUARDIAN.CONTENTSOF VOLUME I.Chapter I. Curtain rises at QueechyII. Things loom out dimly through the smokeIII. You amuse me and I'll amuse youIV. Aunt MiriamV. As to whether a flower can grow in the woodsVI. Queechy at dinnerVII. The curtain falls upon one sceneVIII. The fairy leaves the houseIX. How Mr. Carleton happened to be not at homeX. The fairy and the EnglishmanXI. A little candleXII. Spars belowXIII. ...

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Queechy, Volume I,
by Elizabeth Wetherell
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Queechy, Volume I
Author: Elizabeth Wetherell
Release Date: June 26, 2006 [eBook #18690]
Language: English
***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK QUEECHY, VOLUME I***
Susan Warner (1819-1885), Queechy (1852),
Tauchnitz edition 1854
Produced by Daniel FROMONTCOLLECTION
OF
BRITISH AUTHORS
TAUCHNITZ EDITION.
VOL. 311
QUEECHY. BY ELIZABETH WETHERELL .
IN TWO VOLUMES.
VOL. I.TAUCHNITZ EDITION
by the same author,
THE WIDE WIDE WORLD 1 vol.
THE HILLS OF THE SHATEMUC 2 vols.
SAY AND SEAL 2 vols.
THE OLD HELMET 2 vols.QUEECHY.
BY
ELIZABETH WETHERELL
AUTHOR OF "THE WIDE, WIDE WORLD."
IN TWO VOLUMES.
AUTHOR'S EDITION.
IN TWO VOLUMES
VOL. I
LEIPZIG
BERNHARD TAUCHNITZ
1854
"I hope I may speak of woman without offence to
the ladies."THE GUARDIAN.
CONTENTS
OF VOLUME I.
Chapter I. Curtain rises at Queechy
II. Things loom out dimly through the smoke
III. You amuse me and I'll amuse you
IV. Aunt Miriam
V. As to whether a flower can grow in the woods
VI. Queechy at dinner
VII. The curtain falls upon one scene
VIII. The fairy leaves the house
IX. How Mr. Carleton happened to be not at home
X. The fairy and the Englishman
XI. A little candle
XII. Spars below
XIII. The fairy peeps into an English house, but
does not stay thereXIV. Two Bibles in Paris
XV. Very literary
XVI Dissolving view, ending with a saw-mill in the
distance
XVII. Rain and water-cresses for breakfast
XVIII. Mr. Rossitur's wits sharpened upon a
ploughshare
XIX. Fleda goes after help and finds Dr.
Quackenboss
XX. Society in Queechy
XXI. "The sweetness of a man's friend by hearty
counsel"
XXII. Wherein a great many people pay their
respects, in form and substance
XXIII. The Captain out-generalled by the fairy
XXIV. A breath of the world at Queechy
XXV. "As good a boy as you need to have"
XXVI. Pine knots
XXVII. Sweet in its consequences
QUEECHY.VOL. I
CHAPTER I.
A single cloud on a sunny day,
When all the rest of heaven is clear,
A frown upon the atmosphere,
That hath no business to appear,
When skies are blue and earth is gay.
BYRON.
"Come, dear grandpa! the old mare and the wagon
are at the gate all ready."
"Well, dear! responded a cheerful hearty voice,
"they must wait a bit; I haven't got my hat yet."
"O, I'll get that."
And the little speaker, a girl of some ten or eleven
years old, dashed past the old gentleman, and
running along the narrow passage which led to his
room soon returned with the hat in her hand.
"Yes, dear, but that ain't all. I must put on my
great-coat and I must look and see if I can find any
money "
"O yes for the post-office. It's a beautiful day,
grandpa. Cynthy! wont you come and help grandpa
on with his great- coat? And I'll go out and keep
watch of the old mare till you're ready."A needless caution. For the old mare, though
spirited enough for her years, had seen some
fourteen or fifteen of them, and was in no sort of
danger of running away. She stood in what was
called the back meadow, just without the little
paling fence that enclosed a small courtyard round
the house. Around this courtyard rich pasture-fields
lay on every side, the high road cutting through
them not more than a hundred or two feet from the
house.
The little girl planted herself on the outside of the
paling, and setting her back to it, eyed the old
mare with great contentment; for besides other
grounds for security as to her quiet behaviour, one
of the men employed about the farm, who had
harnessed the equipage, was at the moment
busied in putting some clean straw in the bottom of
the vehicle.
"Watkins," said the child presently to this person,
"here is a strap that is just ready to come
unbuckled."
"What do you know about straps and buckles?"
said the man rather grumly. But he came round,
however, to see what she meant; and while he
drew the one and fastened the other, took special
good care not to let Fleda know that her watchful
eyes had probably saved the whole riding party
from ruin; as the loosing of the strap would of
necessity have brought on a trial of the old mare's
nerves, which not all her philosophy could have
been expected to meet. Fleda was satisfied to see