Short Stories of Various Types
110 Pages
English
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Short Stories of Various Types

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110 Pages
English

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Published 08 December 2010
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Language English

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Short Stories of Various Types, by Various, Edited by Laura F. Freck This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Short Stories of Various Types Author: Various Editor: Laura F. Freck Release Date: March 15, 2007 [eBook #20831] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SHORT STORIES OF VARIOUS TYPES*** E-text prepared by Suzanne Lybarger, Brian Janes, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net) Transcriber's Note: This text contains both footnotes and endnotes. The three footnotes are marked with an upper case letter (i.e., [A]). The endnotes are marked with both a page number and a note number (i.e., [126-1]). Merrill's English Texts SHORT STORIES OF VARIOUS TYPES EDITED WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES BY LAURA F. FRECK, HEAD OF THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT IN THE HIGH SCHOOL, JAMESTOWN, NEW YORK CHARLES E. MERRILL COMPANY NEW YORK AND CHICAGO Merrill's English Texts This series of books includes in complete editions those masterpieces of English Literature that are best adapted for the use of schools and colleges. The editors of the several volumes are chosen for their special qualifications in connection with the texts issued under their individual supervision, but familiarity with the practical needs of the classroom, no less than sound scholarship, characterizes the editing of every book in the series. In connection with each text, the editor has provided a critical and historical introduction, including a sketch of the life of the author and his relation to the thought of his time, critical opinions of the work in question chosen from the great body of English criticism, and, where possible, a portrait of the author. Ample explanatory notes of such passages in the text as call for special attention are supplied, but irrelevant annotation and explanations of the obvious are rigidly excluded. CHARLES E. MERRILL COMPANY COPYRIGHT, 1920 BY CHARLES E. MERRILL CO. TO THE TEACHER These stories have been chosen from authors of varied style and nationalities for use in high schools. The editor has had especially in mind students of the first year of the high school or the last year of the junior high school. The plots are of various types and appeal to the particular interests and awakening experiences of young readers. For instance, there will be found among these tales the detective story by the inimitable Conan Doyle; the true story of adventure, with an animal for the central figure, by Katherine Mayo; the fanciful story by the great stylist Hawthorne; tales of humor or pathos; of simple human love; of character; of nature; of realism; and of idealism. The settings give glimpses of the far West, the middle West, the East, of several foreign countries, of great cities, of little villages, and of the open country. Each story should be read for the first time at a single sitting so that the pupil's mind may receive the single dramatic effect in its unity of impression as the author desired, and more especially that the pupil may enjoy the story first of all as a story, not as a lesson. The pupil of this age, however, will not arrive at the other desirable points to be gained unless he then studies each story with the help of the study questions, of the related biographical sketch, and of the introductory notes, as the teacher feels they are needed for the closer study of the particular story. The stories may be studied happily in connection with the student's composition work. For example, when he has read an adventure story and his mind is stirred by it, why not assign for his next composition, a story of an adventure in which he has been interested or has figured? The mechanics of composition, moreover, are more interestingly learned in connection with an admired author's work. It is to be hoped that the students may be led to read other stories by the same and by different authors. A supplementary list of short stories has been added to the book for this purpose. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Acknowledgment for permission to use the stories printed in this book is gratefully made to Doubleday, Page and Company for "The Gift of the Magi" from Stories of the Four Million by O. Henry; to Hamlin Garland for "A Camping Trip" from Boy Life on the Prairie, published by Harper and Brothers; to Henry Holt and Company for "A Thread without a Knot" from The Real Motive, by Dorothy Canfield Fisher; to Charles Scribner's Sons for "Friends" from Little Aliens by Myra Kelly, and for the story, "American, Sir," by Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews; to Booth Tarkington for "A Reward of Merit" from Penrod and Sam. The stories by Katherine Mayo, Bret Harte, and Nathaniel Hawthorne are used by permission of, and by special arrangement with, Houghton Mifflin Company, the authorized publishers. Special acknowledgment should be made to Mr. Garland for so kindly revising the selection from Boy Life on the Prairie, to meet our needs; and to Mr. Carlson for the translation from the Swedish of Miss Lagerlöf's story. CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION CHAPTER I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII XIII 7 O. HENRY: The Gift of the Magi BOOTH TARKINGTON: A Reward of Merit MARY RAYMOND SHIPMAN ANDREWS: "American, Sir!" KATHERINE MAYO: John G. MYRA KELLY: Friends HAMLIN GARLAND: A Camping Trip DOROTHY CANFIELD FISHER: A Thread Without a Knot FRANCIS BRET HARTE: Chu Chu NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE: Feathertop ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE: The Red-Headed League JAMES MATTHEW BARRIE: The Inconsiderate Waiter ALPHONSE DAUDET: The Siege of Berlin SELMA LAGERLÖF: The Silver Mine 11 19 48 68 77 97 114 141 173 203 238 266 276 295 317 321 NOTES SUGGESTED READING LIST OF SHORT STORIES SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDY INTRODUCTION The Short Story. In the rush of modern life, particularly in America, the short story has come to be the most popular type of fiction. Just as the quickly seen, low-priced moving picture show is taking the place of the drama, with the average person, so the short stories that are found so plentifully in the numerous periodicals of the day are supplanting the novel. The short story may be read at a single sitting. It is a distinct type of literature; that is, it is not just a novel made short or condensed; it is in its inner plan of a wholly different nature. It relates only some single important incident or a closely related series of events, taking place usually in a short space of time, and