Sketches by Seymour — Volume 05
78 Pages
English

Sketches by Seymour — Volume 05

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SKETCHES BY SEYMOUR, Part 5.
The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Sketches of Seymour (Illustrated), Part 5., by Robert Seymour This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Sketches of Seymour (Illustrated), Part 5. Author: Robert Seymour Release Date: July 13, 2004 [EBook #5649] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8858-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SKETCHES OF SEYMOUR ***
Produced by David Widger
SKETCHES BY SEYMOUR
PART FIVE
EBOOK EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: "Sketches by Seymour" was published in various versions about 1836. The copy used for this PG edition has no date and was published by Thomas Fry, London. Some of the 90 plates note only Seymour's name, many are inscribed "Engravings by H. Wallis from sketches by Seymour." The printed book appears to be a compilation of five smaller volumes. From the confused chapter titles the reader may well suspect the printer mixed up the order of the chapters. The complete book in this digital edition is split into five smaller volumes—the individual volumes are of more manageable size than the 7mb complete version. The importance of this collection is in the engravings. The text is often mundane, is full of conundrums and puns popular in the early 1800's—and is mercifully short. No author ...

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Published 08 December 2010
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SKETCHES BY SEYMOUR, Part 5.The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Sketches of Seymour (Illustrated), Part5., by Robert SeymourThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: The Sketches of Seymour (Illustrated), Part 5.Author: Robert SeymourRelease Date: July 13, 2004 [EBook #5649]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8858-1*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SKETCHES OF SEYMOUR ***Produced by David WidgerSKETCHES BY SEYMOURPART FIVE
EBOOK EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION:"Sketches by Seymour" was published in various versionsabout 1836. The copy used for this PG edition has no dateand was published by Thomas Fry, London. Some of the 90plates note only Seymour's name, many are inscribed"Engravings by H. Wallis from sketches by Seymour." Theprinted book appears to be a compilation of five smallervolumes. From the confused chapter titles the reader maywell suspect the printer mixed up the order of the chapters.The complete book in this digital edition is split into fivesmaller volumes—the individual volumes are of moremanageable size than the 7mb complete version.The importance of this collection is in the engravings. The textis often mundane, is full of conundrums and puns popular inthe early 1800's—and is mercifully short. No author is givencredit for the text though the section titled, "TheAutobiography of Andrew Mullins" may give us at least hispen-name.WDCONTENTS:ANDREW MULLINS.—AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY.CHAP. I.CHAP. II.CHAP. III.CHAP. IV.CHAP. V.CHAP. VI.CHAP. VII.CHAP. VIII.CHAP. IX.CHAP. X.CHAP. XI.CHAP. XII.CHAP. XIII.CHAP. XIV.CHAP. XV.CHAP. XVI.CHAP. XVII. A RIGMAROLE.PART I.IntroductoryLet the neighbors smell ve has somethingI wou'dn't like to shoot her exactlyA Situation.The Stalking Horse.A Commission.The Cricket MatchThe Hunter.A Row to Blackwall.The Pic-Nic.The Journey Home.Monsieur Dubois.My Talent Called into Active Service.A Dilemma.An Old Acquaintance.The Loss of a Friend.Promotion."De omnibus rebus."
PART II.PART III. INTERCEPTED LETTERPLATE I.PLATE II."Acti labores Sunt jucundi""Oderunt hilarem tristes."Dye think ve shall be in time for the hunt?Vat a rum chap to go over the 'edge that vay!AANN DARUETOW BMIOUGLLRIANPS.HY.CHAPTER I.—Introductory."Let the neighbors smell ve has something respectable foronce."
THERE is certainly no style of writing requiring so much modest assuranceaVisd aouctqo, boiro garnayp ohtyh; ear  pmoosrtitailo bnl ewshsiecdh , wI itahm a cn oenqfiudael ndt,e nveeiltohpeer mLeorndt  oCf htheer bourrgy,a nn oorfself-esteem, can or could deny.
,gnicnemmoc ,senil nwonk-llewesoht ni tepmurt nwo sih wolb oreh lufhtuoy sih seod ria gnisopmi na tahw htiW.noitisopmoc fo seiceps siht fo ,tnatxe snemiceps detartnecnoc dna esicnoctsom eht fo eno ,spahrep ,sevigsalguoD sih ni)",emoh teews"( ,EMOH.yned dluoc ro nac ,meetse-flesCHAPTER II.—Our Lodging.OUR precarious means were too small to permit us to rent a house, wetherefore rented one large room, which served us for—"Parlor and kitchen and all!"in the uppermost story of a house, containing about a dozen families.This 'airy' apartment was situated in a narrow alley of great thoroughfare, in'Though last, not least, in their dear love.'Although a mere cock-boat in comparison with these first-rates, I think I maysafely follow in their wake. Should the critics, however, condescend to carp atme for likening myself to a cock-boat, I have no objection, if by a twist of theiringenuity, they can prove me to be a little funny!Economy was one of the most prominent characteristics of the family fromwhich I sprang. Now, some authors would weary their indulgent readers with aflatulent chapter upon the moral beauty of this virtue; but as my first wish is towin favor by my candor, I must honestly confess, that necessity was the parentof this lean attenuated offspring!—For, alas!My 'angel mother,' (as Anna Maria phrases it,) was a woman of ten thousand,for she dwelt in one of the most populous districts of London! My sire, was ofthe most noble order of St. Crispin; and though he had many faults, wascontinually mending—being the most eminent cobbler in the neighbourhood.Even in the outset of their connubial partnership, they started under the mostfavorable auspices—for, whereas other couples marry for love or money, theygot married for 'nothing' taking advantage of the annual gratuitous splicingsperformed at Shoreditch Church on one sunshiny Easter Monday.In less than three years my amiable mother presented her lord and masterwith as many interesting pledges of their affection—I was the cobbler's last—dna"My name is Norval."
the heart of the great metropolis.The lower part of this domicile was occupied by one James, who did 'porter'swork,' while his wife superintended the trade of a miscellaneous store, called agreen-grocer's; although the stock comprised, besides a respectable skew ofcabbages, carrots, lettuces, and other things in season, a barrel of small beer, aside of bacon, a few red herrings, a black looking can of 'new milk,' and thoseless perishable articles, Warren's blacking, and Flanders' bricks; while thewindow was graced with a few samples of common confectionary, celebratedunder the sweet names of lollypops, Buonaparte's ribs, and bulls'-eyes.In one pane, by permission, was placed the sign board of my honored parent,informing the reading public, that'Repairs were neatly executed!'In my mind's eye how distinctly do I behold that humble shop in all thegreenness and beauty of its Saturday morning's display.Nor can I ever forget the kind dumpy motherly Mrs. James, who so oftenpatted my curly head, and presented me with a welcome slice of bread andbutter and a drink of milk, invariably repeating in her homely phrase, "a childand a chicken is al'ays a pickin'"—and declaring her belief, that the 'brat' gotscarcely enough to "keep life and soul together"—the real truth of which mycraving stomach inwardly testified.Talk of the charities of the wealthy, they are as 'airy nothings' in the scale,compared with the unostentatious sympathy of the poor! The former only give aportion of their excess, while the latter willingly divide their humble crust with afellow sufferer.The agreeable routine of breakfast, dinner, tea, and supper, was unknown inour frugal establishment; if we obtained one good meal a day, under any name,we were truly thankful.To give some idea of our straitened circumstances, I must relate one solitaryinstance of display on the maternal side. It was on a Saturday night, the air andour appetites were equally keen, when my sire, having unexpectedly touched asmall sum, brought home a couple of pound of real Epping. A scream of delightwelcomed the savory morsel.A fire was kindled, and the meat was presently hissing in the borrowedfrying-pan of our landlady.I was already in bed, when the unusual sound and savor awoke me. I rolledout in a twinkling, and squatting on the floor, watched the culinary operationswith greedy eyes."Tom," said my mother, addressing her spouse, "set open the door andvinder, and let the neighbors smell ve has something respectable for once." CHAPTER. III.—On Temperance.