Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States - From Interviews with Former Slaves - South Carolina Narratives, Part 2
105 Pages
English
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Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States - From Interviews with Former Slaves - South Carolina Narratives, Part 2

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105 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Slave Narratives Vol. XIV. South Carolina, Part 2, by Works Projects Administration This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Slave Narratives Vol. XIV. South Carolina, Part 2 A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interveiws with Former Slaves. Author: Works Projects Administration Release Date: May 18, 2007 [EBook #21508] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SLAVE NARRATIVES VOL. XIV. *** Produced by Janet Blenkinship and The Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division) SLAVE NARRATIVES A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves TYPEWRITTEN RECORDS PREPARED BY THE FEDERAL WRITERS' PROJECT 1936-1938 ASSEMBLED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PROJECT WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SPONSORED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON 1941 VOLUME XIV Illustrated with Photographs SOUTH CAROLINA NARRATIVES PART 2 Prepared by the Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of South Carolina Transcriber's Note: To reflect the individual character of this document, inconsistencies in punctuation and formatting have been retained. Small corrections are shown by dotted red line [HW:] denotes a handwritten amendment. INFORMANTS Eddington, Harriet Edwards, Mary Elliott, Rev. John B. Elmore, Emanuel Emmanuel, Ryer Eubanks, Pen Evans, Lewis Evans, Phillip Fair, Eugenia Farrow, Caroline Feaster, Gus Ferguson, Ann Ford, Aaron Foster, Charlotte Franklin, John Fraser, Emma Frost, Adele Gadsden, Amos Gallman, Janie Gallman, Lucy Gallman, Simon Gary, Laurence Gause, Louisa Gibson, Gracie Giles, Charlie Gillison, Willis Gilmore, Brawley Gladdeny, Pick Gladney, Henry Glasgow, Emoline Glenn, Silas Glover, John Godbold, Hector Goddard, Daniel Godfrey, Ellen Goodwater, Thomas Grant, Charlie Grant, Rebecca Jane Graves, John (Uncle Brack) Greely, Sim Green, Elijah Green, W. M. Grey, Adeline Griffin, Fannie Griffin, Madison 1 2 3 10 11, 17, 22 27 30 34 38 39, 42 43, 48, 54 72 74 80 84 87 88 91 97 100 103, 104 106 107 113 115 117 120 124 129 134 136 138 143 149 153, 159, 161, 164 166 171 177, 183 187 190 195 200 203 209 212 Grigsby, Peggy Guntharpe, Violet Hamilton, John Hamlin, (Hamilton) Susan Harp, Anson Harper, Thomas Harris, Abe Harrison, Eli Harvey, Charlie Jeff Hasty, Eliza Haynes, Dolly Henderson, Liney Henry, Jim Herndon, Zack Heyward, Lavinia Heyward, Lucretia Heywood, Mariah Hill, Jerry Hollins, Jane Holmes, Cornelius Horry, Ben Hughes, Margaret Hunter, Hester 215 216 221 223, 226, 233 237 240 242 244 247 252 258 261 266 271 276 279 282 289 291 294 298, 308, 316, 323 327 331, 335, 341 ILLUSTRATIONS Facing Page Ben Horry 298 [Pg 1] Project 1885-1 FOLKLORE Spartanburg Dist. 4 May 25, 1937 Edited by: Elmer Turnage STORIES OF EX-SLAVES "I was born in the town of Newberry, and was a servant of Major John P. Kinard. I married Sam Eddington. I was a Baker, daughter of Mike and Patience Baker. My mother was a free woman. She had her freedom before the war started; so I was not a slave. I worked on the farm with my mother when she moved back from town. Mama worked in town at hotels; then went back to the country and died. In war time and slavery time, we didn't go to school, 'cause there was no schools for the negroes. After the war was over and everything was settled, negro schools was started. We had a church after the war. I used to go to the white folks' Lutheran church and set in the gallery. On Saturday afternoons we was off, and could do anything we wanted to do, but some of the negroes had to work on Saturdays. In the country, my mother would card, spin, and weave, and I learned it. I could do lots of it." Source: Harriet Eddington (86), Newberry, S.C. Interviewer: G.L. Summer, Newberry, S.C. May 20, 1937. Project 1885-1 FOLKLORE Spartanburg Dist. 4 June 16, 1937 [Pg 2] Edited by: Elmer Turnage STORIES FROM EX-SLAVES "I was born in the section of Greenwood County called 'the promised land'. My parents were Henry and Julis Watkins. I married Frank Edwards when I was young. Our master, Marshall Jordon, was not so mean. He had lots o' slaves and he give 'em good quarters and plenty to eat. He had big gardens, lots of hogs and cattle and a big farm. My master had two children. "Sometimes dey hunted rabbits, squirrels, possums and doves. "De master had two overseers, but we never worked at night. We made our own clothes which we done sometimes late in evening. "We had no school, and didn't learn to read and write, not 'till freedom come when a school started there by a Yankee named Backinstore. Later, our church and Sunday school was in de yard. "We had cotton pickings, cornshuckings and big suppers. We didn't have to work on Christmas. "One of de old-time cures was boiling fever-grass and drinking de tea. Pokeberry salad was cooked, too. A cure for rheumatism was to carry a raw potato in the pocket until it dried up. "I had 11 children and 8 grandchildren. "I think Abe Lincoln was a great man. Don't know much about Jeff Davis. Booker Washington is all right. "I joined church in Flordia, the Methodist church. I was 50 years old. I joined because they had meetings and my daughter had already joined. I think all ought to join de church." Source: Mary Edwards (79), Greenwood, S.C. Interviewed by: G.L. Summer, Newberry, S.C. (6/10/37) Project #1655 Stiles M. Scruggs Columbia, S.C. A SON OF SLAVES CLIMBS UP. The Rev. John B. Elliott, A.B.A. A.M., D.D., 1315 Liberty Hill Avenue, Columbia, S.C., is the son of slaves. He was born at Mount Olive, N.C., in 1869, and missed being a slave by only four years. His college degrees were won at Shaw University, Raleigh, N.C., and the degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him by Allen University of Columbia, S.C. Sitting on the parsonage piazza recently, the Rector of St. Anna's Episcopal Church talked about his struggle for education, and his labors up from slavery. "I was born at Mount Olive, N.C., the son of Soloman Elliott and Alice (Roberts) Elliott. They were slaves when they married, and I escaped bondage by only four years, since slaves were not freed in the South, until 1865. "My father was owned by Robert W. Williams, of Mount Olive, and he was the most highly prized