'Smiles' - A Rose of the Cumberlands

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of 'Smiles', by Eliot H. RobinsonThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: 'Smiles'A Rose of the CumberlandsAuthor: Eliot H. RobinsonIllustrator: H. Weston TaylorRelease Date: August 9, 2007 [EBook #22287]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK 'SMILES' ***Produced by Roger Frank and the Online DistributedProofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net“SMILES”A ROSE OF THE CUMBERLANDSBy ELIOT H. ROBINSON"SMILES": A Rose of the Cumberlands $1.90SMILING PASS: Being a Further Accountof the Career of "Smiles": A Rose of the $1.90CumberlandsMARK GRAY'S HERITAGE $1.90THE MAID OF MIRABELLE: A Romance$1.90of LorraineMAN PROPOSES; or, The Romance of$1.90John Alden ShawGO GET 'EM! The True Adventures of anAmerican Aviator of the Lafayette Flying $1.50CorpsBy Eliot H. Robinson and LieutenantWilliam A. Wellman.WITH OLD GLORY IN BERLIN; or, TheStory of an American Girl's Life and$2.00Trials in Germany and Her Escape fromthe HunsBy Eliot H. Robinson and Josephine Therese.THE PAGE COMPANY53 BEACON STREET, BOSTON"A MAN AND A WOMAN—AS IT WAS INTHE BEGINNING" (See Page 374)"A MAN AND A WOMAN—AS IT WAS IN THEBEGINNING" (See Page 374)“SMILES”A ROSE OF THE CUMBERLANDSBYELIOT H. ROBINSONAuthor of ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of 'Smiles', by Eliot H.
Robinson
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: 'Smiles'
A Rose of the Cumberlands
Author: Eliot H. Robinson
Illustrator: H. Weston Taylor
Release Date: August 9, 2007 [EBook #22287]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
'SMILES' ***
Produced by Roger Frank and the Online Distributed
Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net“SMILES”
A ROSE OF THE CUMBERLANDS
By ELIOT H. ROBINSON
"SMILES": A Rose of the Cumberlands $1.90
SMILING PASS: Being a Further Account
of the Career of "Smiles": A Rose of the $1.90
Cumberlands
MARK GRAY'S HERITAGE $1.90
THE MAID OF MIRABELLE: A Romance
$1.90
of Lorraine
MAN PROPOSES; or, The Romance of
$1.90
John Alden Shaw
GO GET 'EM! The True Adventures of an
American Aviator of the Lafayette Flying $1.50
Corps
By Eliot H. Robinson and Lieutenant
William A. Wellman.
WITH OLD GLORY IN BERLIN; or, The
Story of an American Girl's Life and
$2.00
Trials in Germany and Her Escape from
the Huns
By Eliot H. Robinson and Josephine Therese.THE PAGE COMPANY
53 BEACON STREET, BOSTON
"A MAN AND A WOMAN—AS IT WAS IN THE
BEGINNING" (See Page 374)
"A MAN AND A WOMAN—AS IT WAS IN THE
BEGINNING" (See Page 374)
“SMILES”
A ROSE OF THE CUMBERLANDS
BY
ELIOT H. ROBINSON
Author of "Man Proposes"
ILLUSTRATED BY
H. WESTON TAYLOR
THE PAGE COMPANY
BOSTON PUBLISHERS
Copyright, 1919, by
The Page Company
Entered at Stationers' Hall, LondonAll rights reserved
First Impression, May, 1919
Second Impression, June, 1919
Third Impression, July, 1919
Fourth Impression, August, 1919
Fifth Impression, September, 1919
Sixth Impression, October, 1919
Seventh Impression, December, 1919
Eighth Impression, February, 1920
Ninth Impression, September, 1920
Tenth Impression, August, 1921
TO MY BOYS
THIS STORY OF A GIRL
WHO LOVED CHILDREN
IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED
The Keynote of Life is Love—
Lacking it, naught is worth while—
The Symbol of Service, the Cross
And the Sign of Courage, A Smile.
AN ACKNOWLEDGMENT
I wish to acknowledge, most gratefully, the valuable
assistance rendered to me, in the preparation of the
chapters dealing with the medical and hospital
incidents, by Robert W. Guiler, M.D.; by Alonzo J.
Shadman, M.D., to whom I am indebted for my
description of the unusual operation in Chapter XXI;
and by Miss Elizabeth E. Sullivan, Superintendent of
Nurses at the Boston Children's Hospital. And, aboveall, I desire to make acknowledgment of the debt of
gratitude that I owe to Mr. Henry Wightman Packer for
his helpful criticism throughout the writing of this story.
Eliot Harlow Robinson.
Contents
CHAPTER PAGE
I. Donald MacDonald, M.D. 1
II. Enter Big Jerry 12
III. An Innocent Serpent in Eden 25
IV. "Smiles" 34
V. Giving and Receiving 46
VI. An Unaccepted Challenge 57
VII. "Smiles'" Gift: and the "Writing" 66
VIII. Some of Several Epistles 77
IX. The High Hills, and "God's Man" 91
X. "Smiles'" Consecration 101
XI. Adoption by Blood 113
XII. The Three of Hearts 121
XIII. Gathering Clouds 129
XIV. Sowing the Wind 142
XV. Reaping the Whirlwind 153
XVI. The Aftermath 164
XVII. The Parting Pledge and Passing Days 171
XVIII. The Added Burden 179
XIX. "Smiles'" Appeal 190
XX. The Answer 200XXI. A Modern Miracle 216
XXII. Vicarious Atonement 225
XXIII. Two Letters 235
XXIV. New Scenes, New Friends 241
XXV. The First Milestone 256
XXVI. The Call of the Red Cross 264
XXVII. The Goal 277
XXVIII. "But a Rose Has Thorns" 294
XXIX. An Interlude 309
XXX. Donald's Homecoming 316
XXXI. The Valley of Indecision 329
XXXII. The Storm and the Sacrifice 341
XXXIII. What the Cricket Heard 350
XXXIV. A Lost Brother 361
XXXV. The Hallowed Moon 370
Illustrations
PAGE
"A man and a woman--as it was in the beginnin
g" Frontis
(See Page 374) piece
"One dusty, but dainty, foot was held between h
er hands" 6
"She was kneeling beside a low, rounded moun
d" 48
"Read the brief article twice, mechanically, and
almost without understanding" 298
"Holding the girl in clinging white close to him" 346“SMILES”
CHAPTER I
DONALD MACDONALD, M.D.
The man came to a stop, a look of humiliation and
deep self-disgust on his bronzed face. With methodical
care he leaned his rifle against the seamed trunk of a
forest patriarch and drew the sleeve of his hunting
shirt across his forehead, now glistening with beads of
sweat; then, and not until then, did he relieve his
injured feelings by giving voice to a short but soul-
satisfying expletive.
At the sound of his deep voice the dog, which had,
panting, dropped at his feet after a wild, purposeless
dash through the underbrush, looked up with bright
eyes whose expression conveyed both worship and a
question, and, as the man bent and stroked his wiry
coat, rustled the pine needles with his stubby tail.
The picture held no other animate creatures, and no
other sound disturbed the silence of the woods.
By the hunter's serviceable nickeled timepiece the
afternoon was not spent; but the sun was already
swinging low over the western mountaintop, and its
slanting rays, as they filtered through the leafy
network overhead, had begun to take on the richer
gold of early evening, and the thick forest foliage of
oddly intermingled oak and pine, beech and poplar,
was assuming deeper, more velvety tones. There wassolemn beauty in the scene; but, for the moment, the
man was out of tune with the vibrant color harmonies,
and he frankly stated the reason in his next words,
which were addressed to his unlovely canine
companion, whose sagacity more than compensated
for his appealing homeliness.
"Mike, we're lost!"
City born and bred though he was, the man took a not
unjustifiable pride in the woodcraft which he had
acquired during many vacations spent in the wilds;
hence it was humiliating to have to admit that fact—
even to his dog. To be sure, the fastnesses of the
border Cumberlands were new to him; but his vanity
was hurt by the realization that he had tramped for
nearly an hour through serried ranks of ancient trees
and crowding thickets of laurel and rhododendron—
which seemed to take a personal delight in impeding
the progress of a "furriner"—and over craggy rocks,
only to find, at the end of that time, that he was
entering one end of a short ravine from the other end
of which he had started with the vague purpose of
seeking the path by which he had climbed from the
valley village.
Moreover, a subtle change was taking place in the air.
Faint breezes, the sighing heralds of advancing
evening, were now beginning to steal slowly out from
the picturesque, seamed rocks of the ravine and from
behind each gnarled or stately tree, with an
unmistakable warning.
There was clearly but one logical course for him to
pursue—head straight up the mountainside until heshould arrive at some commanding clearing whence
he could recover his lost bearings and establish some
landmarks for a fresh start downward. With his square
jaw set in a decisive manner, the man picked up his
gun, threw back his heavy shoulders, and began to
climb, driving his muscular body forcibly through the
underbrush.
The decision and the action were both characteristic of
Donald MacDonald, in whose Yankee veins ran the
blood of a dour and purposeful Scottish clan.
Aggressive determination showed in every lineament
of his face, of which his nearest friend, Philip Bentley,
had once said, "The Great Sculptor started to carve a
masterpiece, choosing granite rather than marble as
his medium, and was content to leave it rough hewn."
Every feature was strong and rugged, which gave his
countenance an expression masterful to the point of
being almost surly when it was in repose; but it was a
face which caused most men—and women over thirty
—to turn for a second glance.
To-day, the effect of strength was further enhanced by
a week's growth of blue-black beard. But his eyes,
agate gray and flecked with the green of the "moss"
variety, were the real touchstones of his character,
and they belied the stern lines of his mouth and chin
and spoke eloquently of a warm, kindly heart within
the powerful body, a body which, to the city dweller,
suggested the fullback on a football team. Indeed,
such he had been in those days when great power
counted more heavily than speed and agility. Not but
that he possessed these attributes as well, in a degree
unusual in one who tipped the scales at one hundred
and ninety.