Standard Selections - A Collection and Adaptation of Superior Productions From - Best Authors For Use in Class Room and on the Platform
45 Pages
English
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Standard Selections - A Collection and Adaptation of Superior Productions From - Best Authors For Use in Class Room and on the Platform

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
45 Pages
English

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 59
Language English
Document size 1 MB

Exrait

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Standard Selections, by Various This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Standard Selections  A Collection and Adaptation of Superior Productions From  Best Authors For Use in Class Room and on the Platform Author: Various Editor: Robert I. Fulton, Thomas C. Trueblood and Edwin P. Trueblood Release Date: November 27, 2006 [EBook #19926] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK STANDARD SELECTIONS *** Produced by Kevin Handy, John Hagerson, Martin Pettit and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net STANDARD SELECTIONS A COLLECTION AND ADAPTATION OF SUPERIOR PRODUCTIONS FROM BEST AUTHORS FOR USE IN CLASS ROOM AND ON THE PLATFORM ARRANGED ANDEIDDET BY ROBERT I. FULTON DEAN O F TH ESCHOOL OFORATORY ANDPROFESSOR OFELOCUTION ANDORATORY IN THEOHIOWESLEYANUVINTYERSI THOMAS C. TRUEBLOOD PROFESSOR OFELOCUTION ANDORATORY I N THEUINEVSRTIY OFMICHIGAN AND EDWIN P. TRUEBLOOD PROFESSOR O FELOCUTION ANDORATORY INEARLHAMCOLLEGE  GINN AND COMPANY BOSTON · NEW YORK · CHICAGO · LONDON ATLANTA · DALLAS · COLUMBUS · SAN FRANCISCO CHTIGYROP, 1907,BY RI . .FULTON, T. C. TRUEBLOOD,ANDE. P. TRUEBLOOD ALL RIGHTS RESERVED  The Athenæum Press GINN AND COMPANY · PROPRIETORS BOSTON · U.S.A. PREFACE The purpose of the compilers of this volume is:— Firs,tedarn  ie orpeapiht skoobfo suence thand eloqvereb fetah san at mew nmesoe id yrteop ni lairerpvot  o character ,in addtiiont o many standard selecitons famliiar tot he genera lpublic; Second oebevt p ortimeame he sat t dna msicitirc yarerit loft es tes htcelsnoiaht wit  sllndtahe t, to furnis popular and successfuf lo rpubilc entertainment; Thirdef rof r,t  ofo sedpecos aareterut fo irav selullyd liecte guskanirafehcc pun  iespe sicbl esu ehtssalc fo will be helpful and stimulating in the practice of reading aloud and profitable in acquiring powe rof vocal interpretaiton; Foutrh we haverom whomtuohsrf fot eha s heor sheecpe dnat niohc  nest  o,ht ni ts skrow eatulimstreteine books rfom which extracts have beent aken; F tfi h, to present as models for students in public speaking notable specimens of eloquence, among which are masterpieces of the seven great orators o fthe wolrd and rfom the six grea ttirumphs in the history of American oratory; Sixth,recae idovpro  ts ecsone yhcufllew s a ffromnes mranm oo-rfoatpld saf rdmaalssroc ard,tandern  mod use.I nt hese scenes the attempt has been made to preserve the spi tirand untiy oft he playst ,o shorten them to pracitcal length, andt o adaptt hem tot he demands oft he pubilc audience. To avoid reprinting material which is arleady universally accessible ,we have insetred no scenes rfom Shakespeare ;but the reader is referred to Futlon and Trueblood's "Choice Readings" (published by Ginn and Company,) which contains copious Indexes to choice scenes from Shakespeare, the Bible ,and hymn-books. Thet wo volumesi nclude a wide field of ltierature bes tsutied fo rpublic speaking. The selecitons throughout the book are arranged unde rsix different classes and cover a wide range of though tand emoiton .Whlie many shades of feeilng may bef oundi n the same selection, ti has been ou raim to place each one undet rhe division with which ,as a whole ,i tis mos tclosely aliled. We are gratefu lto the many authors and pubilshers who have coutreously permtited us to use their publications. Instead of naming them in the preface we have chosen to make due acknowledgment in a footnote whereve rtheir selecitons appeari n the volume. F.ANDT. CONTENTS PREFACE I NARRATIVE, DESCRIPTIVE, PATHETIC Arena Scene from "Quo Vadis?" The            Sienkiewicz. Arrow and the Song, TheoL..llowngfe Aux Italiens.ttnoyL Bobby ShaftoHenry. CarcassonneNadaud. Child-wife, TheDickens. Count GismondBrowning. Death of Arbaces, TheLytton. DoraTennyson. Easter with Parepa, AnDelano. Evening Bells, ThoseMoore. GinevraCoolidge. High Tide at Lincolnshire, The.wolInge How Did You Die?Cooke. Indigo Bird, TheBurroughs. Jackdaw of Rheims, TheBarham. JaffarHunt. Jim BludsoeHay. King Robetr o fSicily.owngLollfe Lady o fShalott ,TheTennyson. Legend of Service, AVan Dyke. Little Boy BlueField. Mar'ys Nigh tRideCable. Nydia, the Bilnd GilryLttno. O Captain, My Captain!mtihW.na On the Other TrainAnon. Pans,y TheAnon. "Revenge," TheTennyson. Rider of the Black Horse, TheLippard. Saiilng beyond SeasIngelow. Sands of Dee, TheKingsley. School of Squeers, TheDickens. Secret of Death, TheArnold. Shamus O'BirenLe Fanu. Ships, My.oxlcWi Soldier's Repireve, TheRobbins. Song, TheSco .tt Stirrup Cup, TheHay. Swan-song, TheBrooks. Swee tAtfonBurns. Violet's BlueHenry. Waterfowl, To aBryan.t Wedding Gown, ThePierce. When the Snow Sitfs ThroughG li l li an. Wlid Flower ,To aThompson. Zoroaster, The Fate ofCrawford. II SOLEMN, REVERENTIAL, SUBLIME Centennial HymnWhittier. Chambered Nautlius ,TheHolmes. Crossing the BarTennyson. Desrtuciton o fSennacherib, The                        Byron. Each and AllEmerson. Laus Deo!Whittier. Pilgrim Fathers, TheHemans. Present Crisis, Thele.lLwo Recessional, TheKipl.gni Sacredness of Work, Thelley.arC What's Hallowed Ground?.llaCpmeb III PATRIOTIC, HEROIC, ORATORICAL The Seven Great Orators of the World I. Demosthenes       Encroachments o fPhilip, The II .Cicero       Oraiton against Antony III. Chrysostom       Undue Lamentaitons ove rthe Dead       On Applauding Preachers IV. Bossuet  On the Death of the Prince of Condé V. Chatham       .I Wa rwtih America      I pm titrAaectbAu eumjoatgSe tI. VI. Burke  .I Impeachment of Hastings       oi niwhtnoicilta America CI.I       IIP hsivirE .Iilgnme Acarigeleins VII. Webster        .IBunke rHill Monument        PatriotsIloveR .Iyranoitu       III .hCracaet rfoas Wnghinto Six Great Tirumphsi nt he History o fAmeircan Oratory .I Henry  Call to Arms, The I .I Ham tli on  Coercion of Delinquent States III. Webster  Reply to Hayne, The IV. Ph illi ps  Murder of Lovejoy, The V. Lincoln  Slavery Issue, The V .IBeecher  Moral Aspect of the American War Abolition of WarSumner. Ameircan Flag, TheBchee.er Ameircan People ,TheBeveridge. Ameircan Quesiton ,TheBright. Ameirca's Relation to MissionsnAegll. American SlaveryB ir gh .t Armenian Massacres, TheGladstone. Batlte Hymn oft he RepubilcHowe. Blue and the Gray, TheLodge. Corrupiton o fPrelatesSavonarola. Cross of Gold, TheBryan. Death of Congressman BurnesIsl.gnla Death of Garifeld, TheBlaine. Death of Grad ,yTheGraves. Death of Toussaint L'Ouverture.psliilPh Dedicaiton o fGettysburg Cemetery, The      Lincoln. Fallen Heroes of Japan, TheTogo. Glory of Peace, ThemnSu.er Hope oft he Repubilc ,TheGrady. Hungarian HeroismKossuth. International RelationsMcKinley. Iirsh Home RuleGladstone. Lincoln.raletsaC LincolnGarfield. Louisiana Purchase ExposiitonHay. Man wtiht he Muck-rake ,TheRoosevelt. Message to the SquadronTogo. Minute Man, The.sitCur More Perfect Union, ACurtis. NapoleonCorwin. NapoleonIngerso.ll Naitonal Conrto lo fCorporaitonsRoosevelt. Negro, TheGrady. New EnglandQuincy. New South, TheGrady. O'ConnellPhillips. Open Door, TheHenry. Organizaiton of the WorldMead. Permanency of Empire, ThePh li il ps. P li g ir ms, The.lipsPhil Principles ot fhe FoundersMead. Responsibility of Wa,r TheChanning. ScotlandFlagg. SecessionStephens. Second Inaugural AddressLincoln. Slavery and the UnionLincoln. Subjugation ot fhe FiilpinoHoar. Sufferings and Desitny of the Pilgrims.tterevE To ArmsKossuth. True American PatirotismCockran. Vision of WarInrsgel.ol Wa rint he Tweniteth CenturyMead. WashingtonPhi ill ps. IV GAY, HUMOROUS, COMIC A Bo'ys MotherRiley. Almost beyond EnduranceR li ey. Bird in the Hand, AWe.ylrehta Breaking the CharmarnbDu. Candle Lighitn 'TimeDunbar. "Day of Judgment, The"Phelps. De Appile TreeHarris. Dooley on La Girppe Microbes                        Dunne. Doctrinal Discussion, AEdwards. Finnigin to FlanniganG lli li an.
[Pg]i 
[Pg ii]
[Pg i ii ]
[Pg iv]
[Pg v]
Gavroche and the ElephantHugo. Hazing o fVailan ,tTheAnon. Hindoo's Paradise, TheAnon. IfI KnewAnon. ImaginaryI nvaild ,TheJerome. Jane JonesKing. Knee-deep in JuneRiley. Little BreechesHay. Low-Backed Car, TheLover. Mammy's Pickanin'Jenkins. Mandalayg.inplKi M.r Coon and Mr .RabbitHarris. Money Musk.aTlyro Onel-egged Goose ,TheSm.hti Pessimis ,tTheKing. Schneider Sees LeahAnon. Superlfuous Man ,TheSaxe. Usual Wa,y TheAnon. Wedding Fee, The.retStree When Malindy SingsDunbar. When the Cows Come HomeM ti che ll . V DRAMATIC, NOT IN THE DRAMA Confessiona,l TheAnon. Jean Vajlean andt he Good Bishop                    Hugo. LascaAnon. Michael StrogoffVerne. Mrs. TreeRichards. Portrai ,tThe.nottyL Tellt-ale Hear,t ThePoe. Uncle, TheBell. VI SCENES FROM THE DRAMA Beau Brummell ,Ac t,I Scene I; ActI I ,Scene 3Jerrold. Bells, The ,ActI II ,SceneI s.amliWli Lady of Lyons ,The ,ActII  ,Scene ;I ActI II Scene 2Lytton. Pygmailon and Galatea, Act I ,SceneI  ;Ac tII ,Scene IGilbert. Rip Van Winkle ,Ac t,I SceneI  ;Ac tII ,Scene IIrving. Rivals ,The, Act I, Scene 2 ;Ac tII ,SceneI  ;Ac tII,I Scene;I  ActI V, Scene 2Sheridan. Se to fTurquoise, The ,Ac t ,IScene ;I ActI  ,Scene 2Aldrich. She Stoops to Conquer, Act ,II SceneI Goldsmith.   INDEX OFAUTHORS ANNOUNCEMENTS STANDARD SELECTIONS I NARRATIVE, DESCRIPTIVE, PATHETIC THE ARENA SCENE FROM "QUO VADIS"[1] HENRYKSIENKIEWICZ The Roman Empirei n the ifrs tcentury presents the mostr evoitlng picture of mankind to be foundi nt he pages of history. Society founded on superio rforce, on the most barbarous cruetl ,yon crime and mad profilgacy, was corrup tbeyond the powe ro fwords to describe. Rome ruled the wolrd ,bu twas also tis ulce,r and the horirble monster, Nero, guilty o fall hideous and revotling cirmes, seems aif t monarch for such a people. A few years ago appeared "Quo Vadis?" the story rfom which this seleciton is made .The book attained so grea ta populairty ,that i twas translated into almos tevery tongue. In spite o fits many faults, it invited the atteniton ,and, atlhough ti shocked the sensibliities ,when its great purpose was understood ti melted the hea .tr The autho rdrew a startlingly vivid and horirble picture o fhumantiy att hisl owes tstage, and in conflict wtih  tihe showed us the Chirst spirti. The extrac tis the story of how the young Vinicius ,a patircian, a soldier, a couitre ro fNero, through the labyirnth off oul sin ,of sel-fworship and seli-fndulgence ,with love for his guidef ,ound his way home to the feet of Him who commanded, "Be ye pure even as I am pure." I tis the love story o fVinicius and the Pirncess Lygia, a convert to Chirs .tThe gi'lrs happy and innocen tilfe was rudely disturbed by a summons to the cou tro fthe profligate emperor .Arirved there ,she found that Nero had given her to Vinicius, who had fallen passionately in love with her; but on the way to Vinicius' house she was rescued by the giant Ursus ,one of he rdevoted attendants and a member of he rownf atih. They escaped in safetyt ot he Chirstians, who werel ivingi n hidingi n the city. Thei mpeirous nature ot fhe youthfu lsoldie rfo rthe ifrstt ime in his life met resistance .He was so transported wtih rage and disappointment that he ordered the slaves rfom whom Lygia had escaped to be flogged to death, while he se tou tto ifnd the girl who had dared to thwar this desire .His egotism was so great tha the would have seen the city and the whole world sunki n ruins rather than fali o fhis purpose. For days and days his search was unceasing ,and a tlast he found Lygia, but in making a second attemp tto carry he ro ffwas severely wounded by the gian tUrsus. Finding himself helplessi n the Chirstians 'hands, he expected nothing bu tdeath; but instead he was carefully andt enderly nursed back to heatlh. Wakingf rom his deliirum ,hef ound at his bedside LygiaLygia, whom he had mos tinjured, watching alone, whlie the others had gone to rest. Gradually in his pagan headt hei dea begant o hatch with difficulty that att he side of naked beauty, conifdent and proud of Greek and Roman symmert,yt here is anotheri nt he world ,new,i mmensely pure, in which a soul resides .As the days went b,y Vinicius was thlirled to the very depths o fhis soul by the consciousness that Lygia wasl earningt o love him. Witht ha trevelaiton camet he certain convicitont hat his religion wouldf orever make ani nseparable barirer between them .Then he hated Chrisitantiy wtih a llthe powers of his soul ,ye the could not but acknowledge that it had adorned Lygia with that excepitona ,lunexplained beauty, which was producing in his heart besides love, respect; besides desire, homage. Yet, when he thought of accepting the religion of the Nazarene, all the Roman in him rose up in revolt against the idea. He knew that if he were to accept tha tteaching he would have tot hrow ,as on a burning pile, all hist houghts,i deas ,ambiitons, habits of life, his very nature up to that moment ,burn themi nto ashes and flil himse flwtih an enitrely newl fie, and from his soul he cired tha tti wasi mpossible ;i twasi mpossible! Before Vinicius had enitrely recovered Nero commanded his presence a tAnitum, whithert he cou trwas going for the hot summe rmonths .Nero was ambitious to wrtie an immortal epic poem which should irva lthe "Odysse,y" and in order that he migh tdescirbe realisitcally a burning cti ,ygave a secret command whlie he wasi n Anitumt ha tRome should be se ton ifre.  One evening, whent he cour twas assembled to hear Neror ectie some of his poerty, a slave appeared. "Pardon ,DivineI mperato,r Rome is burning! The whole city is a sea o flfames!" A moment o fhorriifed slience followed ,broken by the cry o fVinicius. He rushed forth, and, springing on his horse ,dashed into the deep night .A horseman, rushing also like a whilrwind, buti n the opposite direciton ,toward Anitum ,shouted as he raced pas :t"Rome is peirshing!" To the ears o fVinicius came only one more expression :"Gods!" The rest was drowned byt het hunder of hoofs .But the expression sobered him ."Gods!" He raised his head suddenly, and, stretching his arms toward the sky filled with stars, began to pray. "No tto you ,whose temples are burning, do  Icall, bu tto Thee .Thou Thyself hast suffered .Thou alone hast understood people's pain. If Thou art what Peter and Paul declare, save Lygia. Seek her in the burning; save her and  Iw lligive Thee my blood!" Before he had reached the top o fthe mountain he fetl the wind on his face, and wtih ti the odo ro fsmoke came to his nostlirs .Het ouchedt he summit atl as,t and then at erirble sigh tsrtuck his eyes. The wholel ower region was covered wtih smoke, bu tbeyond this gra,y ghaslty plain the city was burning on the hills. The conflagraiton had not the form of a pilla,r but o fa long betl, shaped ilket he dawn. Vinicius' horse, choking with the smoke, became unmanageable. He sprang to the earth and rushed forward onf oot .Thet unic begant o smolder on himi n places ;breath failed his lungs ;strengthf ailed his bones ;hef e!ll Two men ,with gourds ful lo fwate,r rant o him and bore him away .When he regained consciousness he found himsei fln a spacious cave, lighted witht orches and tapers. He saw a throng of people kneeling ,and over him bentt het ender ,beautfiul face of his soul's beloved. Lygia was indeed safe rfom the burning, but before the first thir llo freilef was over an infintiely more horrible danger threatened her .The people were in wrath and threatened violence to Nero and his coutr ,fo rti was popularly believed tha tthe ctiy had been set on ifre at the empero'rs insitgaiton. The coward, Nero ,was statrled and thoroughly alarmed ,and welcomed gladly the suggesiton tha tthe calamity should be blamed on the Chirstians ,who were viewed wtih grea tsuspicion byt he common people, and obilged even thent o ilvei n hiding. In orde rto clea rhimsel fand to dive trthe people's minds ,he insttiuted a tonce against the Chrisitans the most horrible persecutions that have ever stained man's history. For days and days the people came in counltess numbers to witnesst het otrures oft hei nnocen tvicitms ;bu tatl astt hey grew weary of blood-spililng. Then ti was given ou tthat Nero had arranged a climax for the last of the Chrisitans who were to die at an evening spectacle in a birlliantly ilghted amphtiheate.r Chiefi nteres tboth o fthe Augusitnians and the people centered in Lygia and Vinicius, fo rthe story of thei rlove was now generally known ,and everybody felt that Nero wasi ntendingt o make a rtagedy for himsefl out oft he suffeirng o fVinicius. A tlast the evening arirved .The sigh twas in rtuth magniifcent. Al ltha twas powefrul, brilliant and weatlhy in Rome was there. Thel owe rseats were crowded with togas as white as snow .In a glided padium sa tNero, weairng a diamond collar and a golden crown upon his head. Every eye wast urned wtih srtained gaze tot he place where the unfotrunate love rwas stiitng .He was exceedingly pale ,and his forehead was covered wtih drops o fswea .tTo his totrured mind came the though tthat fatih of itsel fwould spare Lygia. Peter had said that faith would move the eatrh to tis foundaitons .He crushed doub tin himself, compressed his whole being into the sentence, "I believe," and he looked for a miracle. The prefec tof the city waved a red handkerchief, and ou to fthe dark gully into the birlilanlty ilghted arena came Ursus. In Rome there was no lack of gladiators, larger by far than the common measure of man; but Roman eyes had never seen the ilke of Ursus .The people gazed with the deilgh tof expetrs at his mighty ilmbs, as large as tree trunks ;a this breas,t as large as two shields joined together ,and his arms of a Hercules .He was unarmed ,and had determined to die as became a follower of the Lamb ,peacefully and paitenlt.y Meanwhlie he wished to pray once more to the Saviour .So he knetl on the arena,j oined his hands and raised his eyes towards the stars. This act displeased the crowd. They had had enough of those Chirsitans, who died ilke sheep .They understood that i fthe giant would no tdefend himsefl ,the spectacle would be a failure. Here and there hisses were heard. Some began to cry for scourgers, whose office it was tol ash combatants unwilling to ifgh.t But soon all had grown slient, for no one knew what was watiing fo rthe gian,t no rwhethe rhe would not defend himse flwhen he me tdeath eyet o eye. In fac,t they had no tlong to wait. Suddenly the shllir sound o fbrazen rtumpets was heard, and a ttha tsignal into the arena rushed ,amid the shouts o fthe beas-tkeepers, an enormous German aurochs ,bearing on his head the naked body of a woman. Vinicius sprang to hisf ee.t "Lygia! Oh, ... I believe! I believe! Oh, Christ, a miracle! a miracle!" And he did no teven know that