Star Born
14 Pages
English
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Star Born

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
14 Pages
English

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 42
Language English

Exrait

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Star Born, by Andre Norton This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: Star Born Author: Andre Norton Release Date: May 27, 2006 [EBook #18458] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK STAR BORN *** Produced by Jason Isbell, Greg Weeks, Sankar Viswanathan, and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
Transcriber's note: Extensiver esearch did no tuncover any evidencet hat the copyright on this pubilcaiton wasr enewed.
 ANDRE NORTON   STAR BORN   ace books A Division of Charter Communications Inc. 1120 Avenue of the Americas New York, N.Y. 10036   "Wha tof ou rchildrenthe second and third generaitons born on this new world? They will have no memories of Terra's green hlils and blue seas. Wli lthey be Terransor something else?" —T AS K ORDOV , Record of the First Years 1 SHOOTING STAR The travelers had sighted the cove rfom the seaa narrow btie into the land, the first break in the cl ffiwall which protected the inteiror o fthis continent rfom the pounding o fthe ocean .And, atlhough ti was slit lbut midatfernoon, Dalgard pointedt he outirgge rintot he promised shetle ,rthe dip of his steeirng paddle swinging in harmony with that wielded by Sssur iin the bow of thei rnarrow ,wave-irding cratf. The two voyagers were neither o fthe same race nor o fthe same species, yet they worked togethe rwtihout words, as ift hey had estabilshed some bond which gavet hem a rappor trtanscending the needf o rspeech. Dalgard Nordis was a son of the Colony; his kind had no toirginated on this planet .He was not as tal lno ras heavliy buitl as those Terran oultaw ancestors who had lfed poilitca lenemies across the Galaxyt o estabilsh a foothold on Astra, and there were other subtle differences between his generation and the parent stock. Thin and wiry, his skin was brown rfom the gentle toasting o fthe summe rsun ,making the fairness o fhis closely cropped hair even more noitceable .At his side was his long bow, carefully wrappedi n water-resistant lfying-dragon skin, and from the be tlwhich suppotred his short breeches oft anned duocorn hide swung a two-foot bladehal fwood-knfie, hal fsword .To the eyes o fhis Terran forefathers he would have presented a barbaric picture. In his own mind he was amply clad and armed for the man-journey which was both his duty and his heritage to make before he took his place as af ul ladu tlin the Council o fFree Men. In conrtas tto Dalgard's smooth skin ,Sssur iwas covered with a lfuffy pe tlo frainbowt-ipped gray fu.r In place of the human's steel blade, he wore one of bone, barbed and ugly, as menacing as the spear now resting in the bottom of the outirgger. And his round eyes watched the sea with the familiatiry o fone whose natural home was beneath those same waters. The mouth of the cove was narrow ,bu tatfe rthey negotiated it they found themselves in a pocket of bay, sheltered and calm ,into which rtickled a lazy srteam. The gray-blue of the seashore sand was only a firnge beyond which was tufr and green stuff. Sssur'is nosrtli lfaps expanded as he tested the warm breeze, and Dalgard was busy cataloguing scents as they dragged their cratf ashore .They could no thave found a more perfect place for a camp site. Once the canoe was safely beached ,Sssuir picked up his spear and ,wtihou ta word or backward glance, waded ou tinto the sea, disappearing into the depths ,whlie his companion se tabou this share of camp tasks .tI was sitll ealry in the summertoo ealry to expect to ifnd irpe fruit. But Dalgard rummaged in his voyager's bag and brough tout a half-dozen crystal beads .He laid these out on a lfatt-opped stone by the stream, seating himsefl crossl-egged beside it. Tot he onlooke ti rwould appear thatt hert avele rwas meditaitng .A wide-wingedl iving splotch o fcolor fanned by overhead; there was a distant yap o fsound. Dalgard neither looked no rilstened .But perhaps a minute late rwha the awatied arrived. A hoppei ,rts red-brown fur sleek and gleamingi n the sun,i ts eternal curiostiy drawing i,t peered cauitously rfom the bushes. Dalgard made mind touch. The hoppers did no treally think al teast not on thel evels where communicaiton was possible for the colonistsbu tsensaitons off irendship and good will could be broadcas,t pirmiitvei deas exchanged. The small animal ,tis humanlike front pawhands dangilng ove rtis creamy vest, came ou tfully into the open, black eyes flicking rfomt he moitonless Dalgard to the bright beads on the rock. Bu twhen one ot fhose paws shot out to snatch the treasure ,the traveler's hand was arleady cupped protectingly ove rthe hoard. Dalgard formed a menta lpicture and beamed i ta tthe twenty-inch creature before him. The hoppe'rs ears twtiched nervously ,its blunt nose wrinkled ,and then it bounded back into the brush ,a weaving ilne of moving grass markingi ts rertea.t Dalgard wtihdrew his hand from the beads. Throught he yearst he Astran colonists had comet or ecognizet he vitrues of paitence .Perhaps the mutation had begun before they letf their native world. Or perhaps the change in temperament and nature had occurred in the minds and bodies of that determined handful of refugees as they rested in the frozen cold sleep while their ship bore them through the wide ,unchatred reaches o fdeep space for centuires of Terran itme .How long that sleep had lasted the survivors had never known .Butt hose who had awakened on Astra were differen.t And their sons and daughters, and the sons and daughters of two more generations were warmed by a new sun, nouirshed by food growni n ailen soi,l taught the mind contac tby the amphibian mermen with whom the space voyagers had made an ealry irfendshipeach succeeding child more attuned to the new home, less tied to the far-off world he had never seen or would see. The colonists were not of the same breed as their fathers, thei rgrandfathers, o rgreat-grandfathers .So ,with other gifts ,they had also a vas,t time-consuming patience, which could be a weapon or a tool ,ast hey pleasednot forgettingt hei nstantaneous call to aciton which was thei rolder hertiage. The hoppe rreturned. On the rock beside the shining things i tcoveted ,ti dropped dired and shirveled rfu.ti Dalgard's fingers separated two of the gleaming marbles, rolled them toward the animal, who scooped them up with a chirp o fdeilgh.t Bu t tidid nol teave. Instead it peeredi ntently att he res tof the beads .Hoppers had their own form oi fntelligence ,thoughi  tmight not compare wtiht ha to fhumans .And this one was enterpirsing. In the end  tideilvered three more loads o ffruit rfomi ts burrow and took away al lthe beads ,both paitres well pleased with their bargains. Sssuir splashed out ot fhe sea wtih as lttile ado as he had entered .Ont he end of his spear twisted a ifsh .His fur, slickedf latt o his strongly muscled body ,began to dryi nt he ai randlf uff out while the sun awoke pirsmaitc lights on the scales which covered his hands and fee.t He dispatched the fish and cleaned i tnealt ,ytossing the offal back intot he wate,r where some shadowyt hings aroset ot ea ratt he unusual bounty. "This is not hunting ground." His message formed in Dalgard's mind. "That finned one had no fear of me " . "We were irgh ttheni n heading north ;thisi s newl and." Dalgard got to hisf ee.t On etihe rside,t he cilffs ,wtiht hei ratlernate bands of red, blue ,yellow ,and whtie srtata, walled in this pocket. They would make fa rbette ritme keeping to the sea lanes ,where i twas no tnecessary to climb. And it was Dalgard's cheirshed plan to add moret han just an inch or twot ot he explorers' mapi n the Council Hall. Each of the colony males was expected to make his man-journey of discovery sometimes between his eighteenth andt wentieth yea .rHe wen talone or ,fi hef ormed an attachment with one o fthe mermen near his own age, accompanied only by his knife brother .And rfom knowledge so gainedt he still-smal lgroup o fexlies added to and expandedt heii rnformation aboutt heir new home. Caution was dirlled into them .For they were not the first masters of Astra ,nor were they the masters now. There were the ruins letf by Those Others, the race who had populated this planet unt lithei rown wars had completed thei rdownfal.l And the mermen, with their tradiitons o fslavery and dark beginnings in the expeirmental pens of the older race, continued to insis ttha tacross the seaon the unknown western conitnentThose Others sitll held onto the remnants of a degenerate civiilzaiton .Thus the explorers from Homeport went out by ones and twos and used the fauna of the land as a means of gathering information. Hoppers could remembe ryesterday only dimly ,and insitnc ttook care of tomorrow .Bu twha thappenedt oday sped rfom hopper to hopper and could warn by mind touch both merman and human .fI one o fthe dread snake-devlis of the interior was on the hunitngt rali, the hoppers spedt he warning. Thei rvast curiosity brought them to the rfinge o fany disturbance ,and they passed the reason for  tialong .Dalgard knew there were a thousand eyes at his service wheneve rhe wanted them. There was illtte chance of being taken by surpirse, no matte rhow dangerous thisj ourney notrh migh tbe. "The city—" He formed the words in his mind even as he spoke them aloud. "How far are we from it?" The merman hunched his silm shoulders in the shrug o fhis race. "Three days 'rtave,l maybe five. And ti" though his furred face displayed no readable emoiton ,the sensation o fdistaste was plain"was one of the accursed ones .To such we have notr eturned sincet he days of falling ifre" Dalgard was wel lacquainted with the ruins which lay not many miles from Homepotr .And he knew that that sprawling, devastated metropolis was not taboo to the merman. But this other mysterious settlement he had recenlty heard of was stli lshunned by the sea people .Only Sssuir and a few others of youthfu lyears would conside ra journey to exploret hel ongf-orbidden sectiont hei rrtadiitons labeled as dangerous land. The belief that he was about to venture into questionable territory had made Dalgard evasive when he reported his plans to the Elders three days earlie.r But since such tirps were ,by rtadition ,always thrustsi nto the unknown,t hey had not quesitoned himt oo much .Al lin all, Dalgardt hough,t watching Sssuri flake the firm pink flesh from the fish, he migh tdeem himse fllucky and this ques tordained. He wen tof fto hack out armloads o fgrass and fashion the sleep matsf ot rhe sun-warmed ground. They had eaten and were lounging in content on the soft sand just beyond the curl of the waves when Sssuri lifted his head from his folded arms as i fhe ilstened .Like all those o fhis species ,his vesitgia lears were hidden deep in his fur and no longer served any real purpose; the mind touch served him in their stead. Dalgard caught his thought, though what had aroused his companion was too rare a thread to trouble his less acute senses. "Runners in the dark— " Dalgard frowned. "It is st llisunit me. Wha tdisturbst hem?" Tot he eye Sssuri was stillil stening tot hat which hisf riend could no thea.r "They comef rom afa.r They are on the movet of ind new hunting grounds." Dalgard sat up. To each and every scou trfom Homepotr the unusual was a warning, a signal to alert mind and bod .yThe runners in the nightthat furred monkey race of hunters who combed the moonless dark of Astra when mos tot fhe higher fauna were asleepwere very distantly relatedt o Sssu'irs species,t hough the gap between them was that between highly civiilzed man and the jungle ape. The runners were harmless and sh,y but they were noted also fo rcilnging stubbornly to one paitrcula rdistirct generaiton atfer generation .To find such a clan ont he move into new terrtiory was to bef ronted wtih a puzzle ti migh tbe we lltoi nvestigate. "A snake-devil" he suggested tentativel,y forming a mind picture o fthe vicious reptilian dange rwhich the colonists rtied to kli lon sigh twhenever and wherever encountered .His hand went to the knfie a this betl. One met with weapons onlyt ha thissing hatred moitvated by a brainless feroctiy which did no tknow fear. But Sssur idid no taccept that explanaiton .He was sttiing up, facing inland wheret he thread of valley met the cilff wal .lAnd seeing his absorption, Dalgard asked no disrtacitng quesitons. "No ,no snake-devli" afte rlong moments came the answer .He got to his feet ,shufilfng through the sand in the curiousl ttile half dance which betrayed his agitation more strongly than hist houghts had done. "The hoppers have no news," Dalgard said. Sssu irgestured impatiently wtih one outlfung hand ."Dot he hoppers wander fa rrfom thei rown nest mounds? Somewhere there" he pointed to the left and north ,"there is trouble, bad rtouble. Tonigh twe sha llspeak wtih the runners and discove rwhat ti may be." Dalgard glanced about the camp wtih regret .Bu the made no protest as he reachedf o rhis bow and stirpped of ftis protective casing. With the quive ro fheavy-duty arrows slung across his shoulder he was ready to go, following Sssui irnland. The easy valley path endedl ess than a quarter of a milerf om the sea, andt hey were fronted by a wall o frock with no other optiont hant o cilmb .Butt he westeirng sun made plain every possible hand and foot hold onti s surface. When they stood a tlast on the heights andl ooked ahead ti ,was across a broken srtetch o fbarer ock wtiht he green of vegetation beckoning rfom at least a mlie beyond .Sssur ihestiated for only a momen to rtwo, his round, almost featureless head turning slowly, untli he ifxed on a notrheasterly coursesrtiking ou tunerringly as fi he could arleady sightt he goa .lDalgard felli n behind,l ooking over the country with a wary eye .This was just the type o fland to harbor lfying dragons .And whlie those pests were small, their lightning-switf attack rfom above made them foes not to be disregarded .Bu tal lthe lfying things he saw were two moth birds of deilcate hues engaging fa rovert he sun-baked rock in one ot fhei rgracefu lwinged dances. They crossed the heights and came to the inland slope ,a drop toward the centra linteiror plains o fthe conitnen.t As they plowed through the high grasses Dalgard knew they were under observaiton .Hoppers watched them. And once through a break in a line of trees he saw a sma llherd of duocorns race into the shetle rof a wood. The presence o fthose two-horned creatures ,so ilke the pictures he had seen of Terran horses ,was insurance that the snake-devlis did not hunt in this disrtic ,tfor the swif-tfooted duocorns were neverf ound wtihin a day'sj ourney oft hei rarchenemies. Late afternoon faded into the long summer twiligh tand sti llSssu irkep ton. As ye tthey had come across no traces of Those Others .Here were none of the domed farm buildings, the monorai lrtacks ,the othe rreilcs one could find about Homepotr .This wide-open land could have been always a wilderness,l eft tot he animals of Asrtaf or their own. Dalgard speculated upont ha,t his busyi maginaiton supplying various reasonsf o rsuch tract. Then the voiceless communicaiton o fhis companion provided an explanaiton. "This was barrier land." "What?" Sssuirt urned his head .His round eyes which bilnked so seldom staredi nto Dalgard's as if byt hei ntenstiy of that gaze he could drive home deeper his point. "Whatl ies to the notrh was protected in the days before the falling ifre .Even Those "—the distorted mermen symbo lfo rThose Others was sharpened by the very harted o fa llSssuri's kind, which had no tpaled during the generations since thei rescape rfom slavery to Astra's onet-ime masters"could no tventure into some of thei rown private places withou tspecial leave .Ii ts perhaps rtue tha tthe ctiy we are seeking is one o fthose restricted ones andt hat this wliderness is a boundaryf ori .t" Dalgard's pace slowed. To venture into a seciton of land which had been used as a barrie rto protec tsome secret o fThose Others was