Stories from the Italian Poets: with Lives of the Writers, Volume 2
123 Pages
English
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Stories from the Italian Poets: with Lives of the Writers, Volume 2

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
123 Pages
English

Description

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2, by Leigh HuntThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2Author: Leigh HuntRelease Date: January 8, 2004 [EBook #10635]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ITALIAN POETS ***Produced by Stan Goodman, Jayam Subramanian and PG Distributed ProofreadersSTORIES FROM THE ITALIAN POETS:WITHLIVES OF THE WRITERS.BY LEIGH HUNT.IN TWO VOLUMES.VOL. II.MDCCCXLVI.CONTENTSOFTHE SECOND VOLUME.BOIARDO.CRITICAL NOTICE OF HIS LIFE AND GENIUSTHE ADVENTURES OF ANGELICATHE DEATH OF AGRICAN THE SARACEN FRIENDS Part the SecondSEEING AND BELIEVINGARIOSTO.CRITICAL NOTICE OF HIS LIFE AND GENIUS THE ADVENTURES OF ANGELICA Part I. Angelica and her Suitors II. Angelica and Medoro III. The Jealousy of OrlandoASTOLFO'S JOURNEY TO THE MOONARIODANTE AND GINEVRASUSPICIONISABELLATASSO.CRITICAL NOTICE OF HIS LIFE AND GENIUSOLINDO AND SOPHRONIATANCRED AND CLORINDARINALDO AND ARMIDA; WITH THE ADVENTURE OF THE ENCHANTED FOREST: Part I. Armida in the Christian Camp II. Armida's Hate and Love III. The Terrors of the Enchanted Forest IV. ...

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 25
Language English

Exrait

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2, by Leigh Hunt This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2 Author: Leigh Hunt Release Date: January 8, 2004 [EBook #10635] Language: English *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ITALIAN POETS *** Produced by Stan Goodman, Jayam Subramanian and PG Distributed Proofreaders STORIES FROM THE ITALIAN POETS: WITH LIVES OF THE WRITERS. BY LEIGH HUNT. IN TWO VOLUMES. VOL. II. MDCCCXLVI. CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME. BOIARDO. CRITICAL NOTICE OF HIS LIFE AND GENIUS THE ADVENTURES OF ANGELICA THE DEATH OF AGRICAN THE SARACEN FRIENDS Part the Second SEEING AND BELIEVING ARIOSTO. CRITICAL NOTICE OF HIS LIFE AND GENIUS THE ADVENTURES OF ANGELICA Part I. Angelica and her Suitors II. Angelica and Medoro III. The Jealousy of Orlando ASTOLFO'S JOURNEY TO THE MOON ARIODANTE AND GINEVRA SUSPICION ISABELLA TASSO. CRITICAL NOTICE OF HIS LIFE AND GENIUS OLINDO AND SOPHRONIA TANCRED AND CLORINDA RINALDO AND ARMIDA; WITH THE ADVENTURE OF THE ENCHANTED FOREST: Part I. Armida in the Christian Camp II. Armida's Hate and Love III. The Terrors of the Enchanted Forest IV. The Loves of Rinaldo and Armida V. The Disenchantment of the Forest, and the Taking of Jerusalem, &c. APPENDIX. I. The Death of Agrican II. Angelica and Medoro Translation III. The Jealousy of Orlando IV. The Death of Clorinda V. Tancred in the Enchanted Forest BOIARDO: Critical Notice of his Life and Genius. Critical Notice OF BOIARDO'S LIFE AND GENIUS.[1] While Pulci in Florence was elevating romance out of the street-ballads, and laying the foundation of the chivalrous epic, a poet appeared in Lombardy (whether inspired by his example is uncertain) who was destined to carry it to a graver though still cheerful height, and prepare the way for the crowning glories of Ariosto. In some respects he even excelled Ariosto: in all, with the exception of style, shewed himself a genuine though immature master. Little is known of his life, but that little is very pleasant. It exhibits him in the rare light of a poet who was at once rich, romantic, an Arcadian and a man of the world, a feudal lord and an indulgent philosopher, a courtier equally beloved by prince and people. Matteo Maria Boiardo, Count of Scandiano, Lord of Arceto, Casalgrande, &c., Governor of Reggio, and Captain of the citadel of Modena (it is pleasant to repeat such titles when so adorned), is understood to have been born about the year 1434, at Scandiano, a castle at the foot of the Apennines, not far from Reggio, and famous for its vines. He was of an ancient family, once lords of Rubiera, and son of Giovanni, second count of Scandiano, and Lucia, a lady of a branch of the Strozzi family in Florence, and sister and aunt of Tito and Erole Strozzi, celebrated Latin poets. His parents appear to have been wise people, for they gave him an education that fitted him equally for public and private life. He was even taught, or acquired, more Greek than was common to the men of letters of that age. His whole life seems, accordingly, to have been divided, with equal success, between his duties as a servant of the dukes of Modena, both military and civil, and the prosecution of his beloved art of poetry,—a combination of pursuits which have been idly supposed incompatible. Milton's poetry did not hinder him from being secretary to Cromwell, and an active partisan. Even the sequestered Spenser was a statesman; and poets and writers of fiction abound in the political histories of all the great nations of Europe. When a man possesses a thorough insight into any one intellectual department (except, perhaps, in certain corners of science), it only sharpens his powers of perception for the others, if he chooses to apply them. In the year 1469, Boiardo was one of the noblemen who went to meet the Emperor Frederick the Third on his way to Ferrara, when Duke Borso of Modena entertained him in that city. Two years afterwards, Borso, who had been only Marquis of Ferrara, received its ducal title from the Pope; and on going to Rome to be invested with his new honours, the name of our poet is again found among the adorners of his state. A few days after his return home this prince died; and Boiardo, favoured as he had been by him, appears to have succeeded to a double portion of regard in the friendship of the new duke, Ercole, who was more of his own age. During all this period, from his youth to his prime, our author varied his occupations with Italian and Latin poetry; some of it addressed to a lady of the name of Antonia Caprara, and some to another, whose name is thought to have been Rosa; but whether these ladies died, or his love was diverted elsewhere, he took to wife, in the year 1472, Taddea Gonzaga, of the noble house of that name, daughter of the Count of Novellara. In the course of the same year he is supposed to have begun his great poem. A popular court-favourite, in the prime of life, marrying and commencing a great poem nearly at one and the same time, presents an image of prosperity singularly delightful. By this lady Boiardo had two sons and four daughters. The younger son, Francesco Maria, died in his childhood; but the elder, Camillo, succeeded to his father's title, and left an heir to it,—the last, I believe, of the name. The reception given to the poet's bride, when he took her to Scandiano, is said to have been very splendid. In the ensuing year the duke his master took a wife himself. She was Eleonora, daughter of the King of Naples; and the newly-married poet was among the noblemen who were sent to escort her to Ferrara. For several years afterwards, his time was probably filled up with the composition of the Orlando Innamorato, and the entertainments given by a splendid court. He was appointed Governor of Reggio, probably in 1478. At the expiration of two or three years he was made Captain of the citadel of Modena; and in 1482 a war broke out, with the Venetians, in which he took part, for it interrupted the progress of his poem. In 1484 he returned to it; but ten years afterwards was again and finally interrupted by the unprincipled descent of the French on Italy under Charles the Eighth; and in the December following he died. The Orlando Innamorato was thus left unfinished. Eight years before his decease the author published what he had written of it up to that time, but the first complete edition was posthumous. The poet was writing when the French came: he breaks off with an