Stories the Iroquois Tell Their Children
60 Pages
English
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Stories the Iroquois Tell Their Children

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60 Pages
English

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Project Gutenberg's Stories the Iroquois Tell Their Children, by Mabel PowersThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: Stories the Iroquois Tell Their ChildrenAuthor: Mabel PowersRelease Date: July 18, 2007 [EBook #22096]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK STORIES THE IROQUOIS TELL ***Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Janet Blenkinship and theOnline Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.netcoverfrontispieceSTORIESTHE IROQUOISTELL THEIRCHILDRENtitle decorationMABEL POWERS(YEH SEN NOH WEHS)AMERICAN BOOK COMPANYNEW YORK CINCINNATI CHICAGOCopyright, 1917, byMabel Powers.All rights reserved.W. P. 9TO ALL THE CHILDREN WHO ASKHOW AND WHY,ESPECIALLY THOSE RED CHILDRENWHO SEE WITH WONDER EYES,AND THOSE PALEFACE CHILDRENWHO YET BELIEVE IN FAIRIES,THESE STORIES ARE LOVINGLY DEDICATEDdedication decorationCONTENTS PageAcknowledgment 8Foreword by the Chiefs 9INTRODUCTORYHow the Stories came to Be 11Why I was called the Story-teller 13The Little People 18Story-telling Time 23How the Iroquois give Thanks 27A Firemaker and a Peacemaker 34IROQUOIS WONDER STORIESHow the White Man came 45Why the Eagle defends Americans 49How the Turkey Buzzard Got His Suit 60Why the Partridge drums 66How the Indians ...

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Published 08 December 2010
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Project Gutenberg's Stories the Iroquois Tell Their Children, by Mabel Powers This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Stories the Iroquois Tell Their Children Author: Mabel Powers Release Date: July 18, 2007 [EBook #22096] Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK STORIES THE IROQUOIS TELL ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Janet Blenkinship and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
cover
frontispiece
STORIES
THE IROQUOIS TELL THEIR CHILDREN
title decoration
MABEL POWERS (YEH SEN NOH WEHS)
AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY NEW YORK CINCINNATI CHICAGO
HT
Copyright, 1917, by Mabel Powers. All rights reserved.
W. P. 9
ILSDKERN
TO ALL THECHILDREN WHO A HOW ANDWHY, ESPECIALLY THOSEREDCH WHO SEE WITH WONDER EYES, AND THOSEPALEFACECHILDREN WHO YET BELIEVE IN FAIRIES, E STORIES ARE LOVINGLY DEDICATED
SE
dedication decoration
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FOREWORD Once our fathers own these lands of New York State. Once the Iroquois were great people. Their council fires burn from Hudson on east to Lake Erie on west, from rising to setting sun. Then White man come. He ask for small seat size buffalo skin. He take larger and larger one, till Indian have but small place to sit. Now we have little left but stories of our fathers. They, too, will soon be lost and forgotten, but a voice has come to speak for us.Yeh sen noh wehs—the one who tells the stories—will carry these stories of our fathers to Paleface. She will help White man to understand Indian, Indian to be understood. She will have all men brothers. Indian's heart is glad thatYeh sen noh wehs, our white friend, has come to us. She have good eyes. She see right. She like things Indian. She try to preserve them. Our old men and women tell her the stories told them, many, many moons ago, when little children. Yeh sen noh wehschildren and our children's children may read and know them; and sowrite down these stories so our Paleface Children may learn them also. Indian tell these stories to his children to make them good and brave and kind and unselfish. May they teach Paleface Children how they should do. Again we say, Indian is glad to have some one speak for him. He is glad to have some one write down the great and beautiful thoughts in Indian's mind and heart. We have spoken.Na ho. Chief of Seneca Nation, Chief of Seneca Nation Chief of Onondagas, Chief of Onondagas Chief of Tuscaroras, Chief of Tuscaroras Chief of Oneidas, Chief of Oneidas Chief of Cayugas, Chief of Cayugas Chief of Mohawks, Chief of Mohawks