Study and Stimulants; Or, the Use of Intoxicants and Narcotics in Relation to Intellectual Life
260 Pages
English

Study and Stimulants; Or, the Use of Intoxicants and Narcotics in Relation to Intellectual Life

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Study and Stimulants, by A. Arthur ReadeCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloadingor redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do notchange or edit the header without written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of thisfile. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can alsofind out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****Title: Study and StimulantsAuthor: A. Arthur ReadeRelease Date: October, 2004 [EBook #6752] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was firstposted on January 23, 2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK STUDY AND STIMULANTS ***Produced by Beth L. Constantine, David Moynihan, Charles Franks and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.STUDY AND STIMULANTS;OR,THE USE OF INTOXICANTS AND NARCOTICS IN RELATION TO INTELLECTUAL LIFE,AS ILLUSTRATED BY PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS ON THE ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Study and
Stimulants, by A. Arthur Reade
Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be
sure to check the copyright laws for your country
before downloading or redistributing this or any
other Project Gutenberg eBook.
This header should be the first thing seen when
viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not
remove it. Do not change or edit the header
without written permission.
Please read the "legal small print," and other
information about the eBook and Project
Gutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included is
important information about your specific rights and
restrictions in how the file may be used. You can
also find out about how to make a donation to
Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.
**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla
Electronic Texts**
**eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By
Computers, Since 1971**
*****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands
of Volunteers!*****
Title: Study and StimulantsAuthor: A. Arthur Reade
Release Date: October, 2004 [EBook #6752] [Yes,
we are more than one year ahead of schedule]
[This file was first posted on January 23, 2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK STUDY AND STIMULANTS ***
Produced by Beth L. Constantine, David Moynihan,
Charles Franks and the Online Distributed
Proofreading Team.STUDY AND STIMULANTS;
OR,
THE USE OF INTOXICANTS AND NARCOTICS IN
RELATION TO INTELLECTUAL LIFE,
AS ILLUSTRATED BY PERSONAL
COMMUNICATIONS ON THE SUBJECT, FROM
MEN OF LETTERS AND OF SCIENCE.
EDITED BY A. ARTHUR
READE.INTRODUCTION.
The real influence of the intoxicants and narcotics
in common use has been a matter of fierce and
prolonged controversy. The most opposite opinions
have been set forth with ability and earnestness;
but the weight they would otherwise carry is
lessened by their mutually contradictor-y character.
Notwithstanding the great influence of the
physician's authority, people are perplexed by the
blessings and bannings bestowed upon tobacco
and the various forms of alcohol.
What is the real influence of stimulants and
narcotics upon the brain? Do they give increased
strength, greater lucidity of mind and more
continuous power? Do they weaken and cloud the
intellect, and lessen that capacity for enduring a
prolonged strain of mental exertion which is one of
the first requisites of the intellectual life? Would a
man who is about to enter upon the consideration
of problems, the correct solution of which will
demand all the strength and agility of his mind, be
helped or hindered by their use? These are
questions which are asked every day, and
especially by the young, who seek in vain for an
adequate reply. The student grappling with the
early difficulties of science and literature, wishes to
know whether he will be wiser to use or to abstain
from stimulants.
The theoretical aspect of the question has perhapsbeen sufficiently discussed; but there still remains
the practical inquiry,—"What has been the
experience of those engaged in intellectual work?"
Have men of science—the inventors, the
statesmen, the essayists, and novelists of our own
day—found advantage or the reverse in the use of
alcohol and tobacco?
The problem has for years exercised my thoughts,
and with the hope of arriving at data which would
be trustworthy and decisive, I entered upon an
independent inquiry among the representatives of
literature, science, and art, in Europe and America.
The replies were not only numerous, but in most
cases covered wider ground than that originally
contemplated. Many of the writers give details of
their habits of work, and thus, in addition to the
value of the testimony on this special topic, the
letters throw great light upon the methods of the
intellectual life.
To each writer, and especially to Dr. Alex. Bain,
Mr. R. E. Francillon, Mark Twain, Mr. E.
O'Donovan, Mr. J E. Boehm, Professor Dowden,
the Rev. Dr. Martineau, Count Gubernatis, the
Abbe Moigno, and Professor Magnus, who have
shown hearty interest in the enquiry, I tender my
best thanks for contributing to the solution of the
important problem of the value of stimulants; also
to Mr. W. E. A. Axon for suggestive and much
appreciated help. I should, however, be glad of
further testimonies for use in a second edition.
January, 1883.CONTENTS.
I. Introduction
II. LETTERS FROM:
Abbot, The Rev. Dr.
Allibone, Mr. S. Astin
Argyll, The Duke of, F. R. S.
Arnold, Mr. Matthew
Ayrton, Professor
Bain, Dr. Alexander
Ball, Professor Robert S., LL. D., F. R. S.
Bancroft, Mr. Hubert Howe
Baxendell, Mr. Joseph, F. R. A. S.
Beard, Dr. G. M.
Bert, Professor Paul
Blackie, Professor John Stuart
Blanc, M. LouisBoehm, Mr. J. E., R. A.
Bredencamp, Dr.
Brown, Mr. Ford Madox, R. A.
Buchanan, Mr. Robert
Buddenseig, Dr.
Burnaby, Captain Fred
Butler, Lieut. Col. W. F.
Burnton, Dr. Lauder, F. R. S.
Camp, Madame du
Carpenter, Dr. W. B., C. B., LL. D., F. R. S.
Chambers, Mr. William, LL. D
Childs, Mr. George W.
Claretie, M. Jules
Clarke, Mr. Hyde, F. S. S.
Collins, Mr. Wilkie
Conway, Mr. Moncure D., M. A.
Dallenger, Rev. W. H., F. R. S
Darwin, ProfessorDawkins, W. Boyd, M. A., F. R. S., F. G. S.
D'Orsey, The Rev. Alex. J. D., B. D.
O'Donovon, Mr. Edmund
Dowden, Professor, LL. D.
Edison, Professor
Ellis, Mr. Alex. J., F. R. S., F. S. A.
Everett, Professor
Fairbairn, Professor R. M.
Francillon, Mr. R. E.
Freeman, Mr. Edward A., D. C. L., LL. D.
Furnivall, Mr. F. J., M. A.
Gardiner, Mr. Samuel R., Hon. LL. D.
Gladstone, Rt. Hon. W. E., M. P.
Greville, Mdlle. II
Gubernatis, Count
Guenin, M. L. P.
Guy, Dr. William
Haeckel, Professor Ernst