Sword and Pen - Ventures and Adventures of Willard Glazier
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English

Sword and Pen - Ventures and Adventures of Willard Glazier

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The Project Gutenberg eBook of Sword and Pen, by JohnAlgernon OwensThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Sword and PenVentures and Adventures of Willard GlazierAuthor: John Algernon OwensRelease Date: February 21, 2009 [eBook #28152]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SWORD AND PEN*** E-text prepared by Juliet Sutherland, David Cortesi,and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team(http://www.pgdp.net) TRANSCRIBER'S NOTESSeveral minor typographical errors have been corrected in transcribing this work. The corrected words are shown witha light underscore like this: continue. Hover the mouse over the word to see the original text. Typos aside, the text isoriginal and retains some inconsistent or outdated spellings. This HTML file uses the Latin-1 (ISO 8859-1) character set,but all non-ASCII characters are rendered using HTML entity notation, for example Æ for Æ.The original contains two lengthy addenda supplied by the publisher which were not named in the Table of Contents.Entries for these have been added to the Contents for convenient linking.The 44 full-page illustrations from the original are shown inline in reduced form. Click any illustration to open a ...

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Published 08 December 2010
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Language English

The Project Gutenberg
eBook of Sword and Pen,
by John Algernon Owens
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Sword and Pen
Ventures and Adventures of Willard Glazier
Author: John Algernon Owens
Release Date: February 21, 2009 [eBook #28152]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
SWORD AND PEN***

E-text prepared by Juliet Sutherland, DavidCortesi,
and the Project Gutenberg Online
Distributed Proofreading Team
(http://www.pgdp.net)

TRANSCRIBER'S NOTES
Several minor typographical errors have been
corrected in transcribing this work. The corrected
words are shown with a light underscore like this:
continue. Hover the mouse over the word to see the
original text. Typos aside, the text is original and
retains some inconsistent or outdated spellings. This
HTML file uses the Latin-1 (ISO 8859-1) character set,
but all non-ASCII characters are rendered using HTML
entity notation, for example Æ for Æ.
The original contains two lengthy addenda supplied by
the publisher which were not named in the Table of
Contents. Entries for these have been added to the
Contents for convenient linking.
The 44 full-page illustrations from the original are
shown inline in reduced form. Click any illustration to
open a larger version that will print at the original size.
Despite the many testimonials in this book, as of 2008,
the source of the Mississippi is considered to be Lake
Itasca. Following a five-month investigation in 1891 it
was decided that the stream from Elk Lake (the body
that Glazier would have called Lake Glazier) intoItasca is too insignificant to be deemed the river's
source. Both lakes can be seen, looking much as they
do in the maps in this book, by directing any online
mapping service to 47°11'N, 95°14'W.


Advertisement for Works of Glazier
Portrait of Willard Glazier
original title page
Sword and Pen;
OR,
Ventures and Adventures
OF
WILLARD GLAZIER,
(The Soldier-Author,)
IN
WAR AND LITERATURE:COMPRISING
INCIDENTS AND REMINISCENCES OF HIS
CHILDHOOD; HIS
CHEQUERED LIFE AS A STUDENT AND
TEACHER; AND HIS
REMARKABLE CAREER AS A SOLDIER
AND AUTHOR;
EMBRACING ALSO THE STORY OF HIS
UNPRECEDENTED
JOURNEY FROM OCEAN TO OCEAN
ON HORSEBACK; AND AN ACCOUNT OF
HIS DISCOVERY OF THE TRUE SOURCE
OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, AND
CANOE VOYAGE THENCE TO
THE GULF OF MEXICO.
BY
JOHN ALGERNON OWENS.
Illustrated.
PHILADELPHIA:
P. W. ZIEGLER &. COMPANY, PUBLISHERS,
720 CHESTNUT STREET.
1890.
Entered according to Act of Congress, in
the year 1880, by
JOHN ALGERNON OWENS,In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at
Washington, D.C.
PREFACE.
No apology will be required from the author for
presenting to the public some episodes in the useful
career of a self-made man; and while the spirit of
patriotism continues to animate the sturdy sons of
America, the story of one of them who has exemplified
this national trait in a conspicuous measure, will be
deemed not unworthy of record. The lessons it
teaches, more especially to the young, are those of
uncompromising duty in every relation of life—self-
denial, perseverance and "pluck;" while the successive
stages of a course which led ultimately to a brilliant
success, may be studied with some advantage by
those just entering upon the business of life. As a
soldier, Willard Glazier was "without fear and without
reproach." As an author, it is sufficient to say, he is
appreciated by his contemporaries—than which, on a
literary man, no higher encomium can be passed. The
sale of nearly half a million copies of one of his
productions is no slight testimony to its value.
Biography, to be interesting, must be a transcript of an
eventful, as well as a remarkable career; and to be
instructive, its subject should be exemplary in his
aims, and in his mode of attaining them. The hero of
this story comes fully up to the standard thus
indicated. His career has been a romance. Born of
parents of small means but of excellent character andrepute; and bred and nurtured in the midst of some of
the wildest and grandest scenery in the rugged county
of St. Lawrence, close by the "Thousand Isles," where
New York best proves her right to be called the
Empire State through the stamp of royalty on her hills
and streams—under the shadow of such surroundings
as these, my subject attained maturity, with no
opportunities for culture except those he made for
himself. Yet he became possessed of an education
eminently useful, essentially practical and calculated to
establish just such habits of self-reliance and decision
as afterwards proved chiefly instrumental in his
success. Glazier had a fixed ambition to rise. He felt
that the task would be difficult of accomplishment—
that he must be not only the architect, but the builder
of his own fortunes; and, as the statue grows beneath
the sculptor's hand to perfect contour from the
unshapely block of marble, so prosperity came to
Captain Glazier only after he had cut and chiseled
away at the hard surface of inexorable circumstance,
and moulded therefrom the statue of his destiny.
J. A. O.
Philadelphia, June 14th, 1880.
TO
THE MEMORY OF
ULYSSES SIMPSON GRANT,
WHOSE SWORD,
AND TO THAT OF
HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW,
WHOSE PEN,Have so Nobly Illustrated the Valor and Genius of their
Country:
THE AUTHOR,
In a Spirit of Profound Admiration for
THE RENOWNED SOLDIER,
And of Measureless Gratitude to
THE IMMORTAL WRITER,
Dedicates This Book.
CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I.
ORIGIN OF THE GLAZIER FAMILY.
Lineage of Willard Glazier. — A good stock. — Oliver
Glazier at the Battle of Bunker Hill. — The home of
honest industry. — The Coronet of Pembroke. — The
"Homestead Farm." — Mehitable Bolton. — Her New
England home. — Her marriage to Ward Glazier. —
The wild "North Woods." — The mother of the soldier-
author21
CHAPTER II.
BIRTH AND CHILDHOOD OF WILLARD
GLAZIER.
The infant stranger. — A mother's prayers. — "Be just
before you are generous." — Careful training. —
Willard Glazier's first battle. — A narrow escape. —
Facing the foe. — The "happy days of childhood." —
"The boy is father to the man"27CHAPTER III.
EARLY LIFE AND HABITS.
Scotch-Irish Presbyterianism of twenty-five years ago.
— The "little deacon." — First days at school. —
Choosing a wife. — A youthful gallant. — A close
scholar but a wild lad. — A mother's influence. —
Ward Glazier a Grahamite. — Young Willard's
practical jokes. — Anecdote of Crystal Spring. —
"That is something like water"34
CHAPTER IV.
WILLARD GLAZIER AT SCHOOL.
School-days continued. — Boys will be boys. —
Cornelius Carter, the teacher. — Young Willard's
rebellion against injustice. — Gum-chewing. —
Laughable race through the snow. — The tumble into
a snow-bank, and what came of it. — The runaway
caught. — Explanation and reconciliation. — The new
master, James Nichols. — "Spare the rod and spoil
the child." — The age of chivalry not gone. —
Magnanimity of a school-boy. — Friendship between
Willard and Henry Abbott. — Good-bye to the "little
deacon"42
CHAPTER V.
ECCENTRICITIES OF HENRY GLAZIER.
Henry Glazier. — A singular character. — "Kaw-shaw-
gan-ce" and "Quaw-taw-pee-ab." — Tom Lolar and
Henry Glazier. — Attractive show-bills. — Billy
Muldoon and his trombone. — Behind the scenes. —"Sound your G!" — The mysterious musician. — What
happened to Billy. — "May the divil fly away wid ye!"50
CHAPTER VI.
VISIONS OF THE FUTURE.
The big uncle and the little nephew. — Exchange of
ideas between the eccentric Henry Glazier and young
Willard. — Inseparable companions. — Willard's early
reading. — Favorite authors. — Hero-worship of the
first Napoleon and Charles XII. of Sweden. — The
genius of good and of evil. — Allen Wight. — A born
teacher. — Reverses of fortune. — The shadow on
the home. — Willard's resolve to seek his fortune and
what came of it. — The sleep under the trees. — The
prodigal's return. — "All's well that ends well"58
CHAPTER VII.
WILLARD GLAZIER AT HOME.
Out of boyhood. — Days of adolescence. — True
family pride. — Schemes for the future. — Willard as
a temperance advocate. — Watering his grandfather's
whiskey. — The pump behind the hill. — The sleigh-
ride by night. — The "shakedown" at Edward's. —
Intoxicated by tobacco fumes. — The return ride. —
Landed in a snow-bank. — Good-bye horses and
sleigh! — Plodding through the snow68
CHAPTER VIII.
ADVENTURES — EQUINE AND BOVINE.
Ward Glazier moves to the Davis Place. — "Far in the