The 1992 CIA World Factbook

The 1992 CIA World Factbook

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The 1992 CIA World Factbook, by United States. Central Intelligence Agency.
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at
www.gutenberg.net
Title: The 1992 CIA World Factbook
Author: United States. Central Intelligence Agency.
Posting Date: February 21, 2010 [EBook #48] Release Date: October, 1993
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE 1992 CIA WORLD FACTBOOK ***
Produced by Dr. Gregory B. Newby
The Project Gutenberg Edition of THE CIA WORLD FACTBOOK 1992: January 1, 1993
This edition, as are all Project Gutenberg Editions, is Plain Vanilla ASCII, meaning there are no characters other than
what you would see on paper, thus no page returns, no markup, nothing but the characters you would type if you were to
copy this from a book on a typewriter. Repetitive paged headers and trailing spaces are not present. Leading spaces
have been preserved in fact sections for readability.
Mail subject headers can be searched with leading :'s. . .such as:
:Afghanistan Geography
:Afghanistan People
:Afghanistan Government
:Afghanistan Government
:Afghanistan Economy
:Afghanistan Economy
:Afghanistan Communications
:Afghanistan Defense Forces
To find the beginning of any country, search for :country
To find internal information, search for :country ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The 1992 CIA
World Factbook, by United States. Central
Intelligence Agency.
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The 1992 CIA World Factbook
Author: United States. Central Intelligence Agency.
Posting Date: February 21, 2010 [EBook #48]
Release Date: October, 1993
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK THE 1992 CIA WORLD FACTBOOK ***
Produced by Dr. Gregory B. NewbyThe Project Gutenberg Edition of THE CIA WORLD
FACTBOOK 1992: January 1, 1993
This edition, as are all Project Gutenberg Editions,
is Plain Vanilla ASCII, meaning there are no
characters other than what you would see on
paper, thus no page returns, no markup, nothing
but the characters you would type if you were to
copy this from a book on a typewriter. Repetitive
paged headers and trailing spaces are not present.
Leading spaces have been preserved in fact
sections for readability.
Mail subject headers can be searched with leading
:'s. . .such as:
:Afghanistan Geography
:Afghanistan People
:Afghanistan Government
:Afghanistan Government
:Afghanistan Economy
:Afghanistan Economy
:Afghanistan Communications
:Afghanistan Defense Forces
To find the beginning of any country, search for
:country
To find internal information, search for :country
section, as above.
THE CIA WORLD FACTBOOK 1992:Afghanistan Geography
Total area:
647,500 km2
Land area:
647,500 km2
Comparative area:
slightly smaller than Texas
Land boundaries:
5,529 km total; China 76 km, Iran 936 km,
Pakistan 2,430 km, Tajikistan
1,206 km, Turkmenistan 744 km, Uzbekistan
137 km
Coastline:
none - landlocked
Maritime claims:
none - landlocked
Disputes:
Pashtunistan issue over the North-West Frontier
Province with Pakistan;
periodic disputes with Iran over Helmand water
rights; Pakistan, Saudi
Arabia, and Iran continue to support clients in
country; power struggles
among various groups for control of Kabul,
regional rivalries among emerging
warlords, and traditional tribal disputes continue
Climate:
arid to semiarid; cold winters and hot summers
Terrain:
mostly rugged mountains; plains in north and
southwest
Natural resources:
natural gas, crude oil, coal, copper, talc, barites,sulphur, lead, zinc,
iron ore, salt, precious and semiprecious stones
Land use:
arable land 12%; permanent crops NEGL%;
meadows and pastures 46%; forest and
woodland 3%; other 39%; includes irrigated
NEGL%
Environment:
damaging earthquakes occur in Hindu Kush
mountains; soil degradation,
desertification, overgrazing, deforestation,
pollution
Note:
landlocked
:Afghanistan People
Population:
US Bureau of the Census - 16,095,664 (July
1992), growth rate 2.4% (1992)
and excludes 3,750,796 refugees in Pakistan
and 1,607,281 refugees in Iran;
note - another report indicates a July 1990
population of 16,904,904,
including 3,271,580 refugees in Pakistan and
1,277,700 refugees in Iran
Birth rate:
44 births/1,000 population (1992)
Death rate:
20 deaths/1,000 population (1992)
Net migration rate:
0 migrants/1,000 population (1992); note - there
are flows across the border
in both directions, but data are fragmentary andunreliable
Infant mortality rate:
162 deaths/1,000 live births (1992)
Life expectancy at birth:
45 years male, 43 years female (1992)
Total fertility rate:
6.4 children born/woman (1992)
Nationality:
noun - Afghan(s); adjective - Afghan
Ethnic divisions:
Pashtun 38%, Tajik 25%, Uzbek 6%, Hazara
19%; minor ethnic groups include
Chahar Aimaks, Turkmen, Baloch, and others
Religions:
Sunni Muslim 84%, Shi`a Muslim 15%, other 1%
Languages:
Pashtu 35%, Afghan Persian (Dari) 50%, Turkic
languages (primarily Uzbek and
Turkmen) 11%, 30 minor languages (primarily
Balochi and Pashai) 4%; much
bilingualism
Literacy:
29% (male 44%, female 14%) age 15 and over
can read and write (1990 est.)
Labor force:
4,980,000; agriculture and animal husbandry
67.8%, industry 10.2%,
construction 6.3%, commerce 5.0%, services
and other 10.7%, (1980 est.)
Organized labor:
some small government-controlled unions
existed under the former regime but
probably now have disbanded:Afghanistan Government
Long-form name:
Islamic State of Afghanistan
Type:
transitional
Capital:
Kabul
Administrative divisions:
30 provinces (velayat, singular - velayat);
Badakhshan, Badghis, Baghlan,
Balkh, Bamian, Farah, Faryab, Ghazni, Ghowr,
Helmand, Herat, Jowzjan, Kabol,
Kandahar, Kapisa, Konar, Kondoz, Laghman,
Lowgar, Nangarhar, Nimruz,
Oruzgan, Paktia, Paktika, Parvan, Samangan,
Sar-e Pol, Takhar, Vardak,
Zabol; note - there may be a new province of
Nurestan (Nuristan)
Independence:
19 August 1919 (from UK)
Constitution:
the old Communist-era constitution probably will
be replaced with an Islamic
constitution
Legal system:
a new legal system has not been adopted but
the transitional government has
declared it will follow Islamic law (Shari`a)
National holiday:
28 April, Victory of the Muslim Nation; 4 May,
Remembrance Day for Martyrs
and Disabled; 19 August, Independence Day
Executive branch: a 51-member transitional council headed by
Sibghatullah MOJADDEDI rules
Kabul; this body is to turn over power to a
leadership council, which will
function as the government and organize
elections; Burhanuddin RABBANI will
serve as interim President
Legislative branch:
previous bicameral legislature has been
abolished
Judicial branch:
an interim Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
has been appointed, but a new
court system has not yet been organized
Leaders:
Chief of State and Head of Government:
Interim President Burhanuddin RABBANI; First
Vice President Abdul Wahed
SORABI (since 7 January 1991); Prime Minister
Fazil Haq KHALIQYAR (since 21
May 1990)
Political parties and leaders:
the former resistance parties represent the only
current political
organizations and include Jamiat-i-Islami
(Islamic Society), Burhanuddin
RABBANI; Hizbi Islami-Gulbuddin (Islamic
Party), Gulbuddin Hikmatyar
Faction; Hizbi Islami-Khalis (Islamic Party) Yunis
Khalis Faction;
Ittihad-i-Islami Barai Azadi Afghanistan (Islamic
Union for the Liberation
of Afghanistan), Abdul Rasul SAYYAF; Harakat-
Inqilab-i-Islami (Islamic Revolutionary Movement), Mohammad Nabi
MOHAMMADI; Jabha-i-Najat-i-Milli
Afghanistan (Afghanistan National Liberation
Front), Sibghatullah MOJADDEDI;
Mahaz-i-Milli-Islami (National Islamic Front),
Sayed Ahamad GAILANI;
Jonbesh-i-Milli Islami (National Islamic
Movement), Ahmad Shah MASOOD and
Rashid DOSTAM; Hizbi Wahdat (Islamic Unity
Party), and a number of minor
resistance parties; the former ruling Watan
Party has been disbanded
Suffrage:
undetermined; previously universal, male ages
15-50
Elections:
the transition government has promised
elections in October 1992
Communists:
the former ruling Watan (Homeland) Party has
been disbanded
:Afghanistan Government
Other political or pressure groups:
the former resistance commanders are the
major power brokers in the
countryside; shuras (councils) of commanders
are now administering most
cities outside Kabul; ulema (religious scholars);
tribal elders
Member of:
Has previously been a member of AsDB, CP,
ESCAP, FAO, G-77, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, IDA, IDB, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF,
INTELSAT, IOC, ITU, LORCS, NAM, OIC,
UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WFTU,
WHO, WMO, WTO; note - the new
government has not yet announced whether it
will continue to be a member of
these bodies; the former resistance government
in exile (Afghan Interim
Government) was given membership in the OIC
in 1989
Diplomatic representation:
previous Minister-Counselor, Charge d'Affaires
Abdul Ghafur JOUSHAN;
Chancery at 2341 Wyoming Avenue NW,
Washington, DC 20008; telephone (202)
234-3770 or 3771; a new representative has not
yet been named
US:
Charge d'Affaires (vacant); Embassy at Ansari
Wat, Wazir Akbar Khan Mina,
Kabul; telephone 62230 through 62235 or
62436; note - US Embassy in Kabul
was closed in January 1989
Flag:
a new flag of unknown description reportedly
has been adopted; previous flag
consisted of three equal horizontal bands of
black (top), red, and green,
with the national coat of arms superimposed on
the hoist side of the black
and red bands; similar to the flag of Malawi,
which is shorter and bears a
radiant, rising red sun centered in the black
band