The Art of Illustration - 2nd ed.
60 Pages
English

The Art of Illustration - 2nd ed.

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Art of Illustration, by Henry BlackburnThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: The Art of Illustration2nd ed.Author: Henry BlackburnRelease Date: May 10, 2010 [EBook #32320]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE ART OF ILLUSTRATION ***Produced by Marius Masi, Chris Curnow and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net. THE ART OF ILLUSTRATION. “THE TRUMPETER.” (SIR JOHN GILBERT, R.A.)(Drawn in pen and ink, from his picture in the Royal Academy, 1883.)[Size of drawing, 5½ by 4¾ in. Photo-zinc process.] The Art of Illustration.BYHENRY BLACKBURN,Editor of “Academy Notes,” Cantor Lecturer on Illustration, &c.WITHNINETY-FIVE ILLUSTRATIONS. SECOND EDITION.LONDON:W. H. ALLEN & CO., Limited,13, WATERLOO PLACE, S.W.1896. PRINTED BYWYMAN AND SONS, LIMITED,LONDON, W.C. DEDICATED TOSIR JOHN GILBERT, R.A.,ONE OF THE PRINCIPAL PIONEERSOF BOOK AND NEWSPAPER ILLUSTRATION. (PEN-AND-INK DRAWING FROM HIS PICTURE, BY MR. CHARLES COLLINS, 1892.)[Photo-zinc process.]PREFACE.HE object of this book is to explain the modern systems of Book and Newspaper Illustration, and especially themethods of drawing for what is commonly called “process,” on which so many ...

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Published 08 December 2010
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Art of Illustration, by Henry Blackburn
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Art of Illustration 2nd ed.
Author: Henry Blackburn
Release Date: May 10, 2010 [EBook #32320]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE ART OF ILLUSTRATION ***
Produced by Marius Masi, Chris Curnow and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net.
 
 
 
 
 
TEH ART OF ILLUSTRATION.
“THE TRUMPETER.” (SIR JOHN GILBERT, R.A.) (Drawn in pen and ink, from his picture in the Royal Academy, 1883.) [Size of drawing, 5½ by 4¾ in. Photo-zinc process.]
The Art of Illustration.
BY HENRY BLACKBURN, Editor of “Academy Notes,” Cantor Lecturer on Illustration, &c.
W ITH NINETY -FIVE ILLUSTRATIONS.
SECOND EDITION. LONDON: W . H. ALLEN & CO., Limited, 13, W ATERLOO PLACE, S.W . 1896.
 PRINTED BY W YMAN AND SONS, LIMITED, LONDON, W .C.
 DEDICATED TO SIR JOHN GILBERT, R.A., ONE OF THE PRINCIPAL PIONEERS OF BOOK AND NEW SPAPER ILLUSTRATION.
 
(PEN-AND-INK DRAWING FROMHIS PICTURE, BYMR. CHARLES COLLINS, 1892.) [Photo-zinc process.]
PREFACE.
HE object of this book is to explain the modern systems of Book and Newspaper Illustration, and especially the methods of drawing for what is commonly called “process,” on which so many artists are now engaged. There is almost a revolution in illustration at the present time, and both old and young—teachers and scholars—are in want of a handbook for reference when turning to the new methods. The illustrator of to-day is called upon suddenly to take the place of the wood engraver in interpreting tone into line, and requires practical information which this book is intended to supply. The most important branch of illustration treated of isline drawing, as it is practically out of reach of competition by the photographer, and is, moreover, the kind of drawing most easily reproduced and printed at the type press; but wash drawing, drawing upon grained papers, and the modern appliances for reproduction, are all treated of. The best instructors in drawing for process are, after all, thepainters of pictures know so well how to express who themselves in black and white, and to whom I owe many obligations. There is a wide distinction between their treatment of “illustration” and the so-called “pen-and-ink” artist. The “genius” who strikes out a wonderful path of his own, whose scratches and splashes appear in so many books and newspapers, is of the “butterfly” order of being—a creation, so to speak, of the processes, and is not to be emulated or imitated. There is no reason but custom why, in drawing for process, a man’s coat should be made to look like straw, or the background (if there be a background) have the appearance of fireworks. No ability on the part of the illustrator will make these things tolerable in the near future. There is a reaction already, and signs of a better and more sober treatment of illustration, which only requires abetter understanding of the requirements and limitations of the processes, to make it equal to some of the best work of the past. The modern illustrator has much to learn—more than he imagines—in drawing for the processes. A study of examples by masters of line drawing—such as Holbein, Menzell, Fortuny or Sandys—or of the best work of the etchers, will not tell the student of to-day exactly what he requires to know; for they are nearly all misleading as to the principles upon which modern process work is based. In painting we learn everything from the past—everything that it is best to know. In engraving also, we learn from the past the best way to interpret colour into line, but in drawing for the processes there is practically no “past” to refer to; at the same time the advance of the photographer into the domain of illustration renders it of vital importance to artists to put forth their best work in black and white, and it throws great responsibility upon art teachers to give a good groundwork of education to the illustrator of the future. In all this, education—general education—will take a wider part. The Illustrations have been selected to show the possibilities of “process” work in educated, capable hands, rather than anytours de forcein drawing, or exploits of genius. They are all of modern work, and are printed on the same sheets as the letterpress. All the Illustrations in this book have been reproduced by mechanical processes, excepting nine on the (marked list), which are engraved on wood. Acknowledgments are due to the Council of the Society of Arts for permission to reprint a portion of the Cantor Lectures on “Illustration” from their Journal; to the Editors of theNational Review the andNineteenth Century, for permission to reprint several pages from articles in those reviews; to the Editors and Publishers who have lent illustrations; and above all, to the artists whose works adorn these pages. H. B.
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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
CONTENTS. PAGE. CHAPTER I.—Introductory1 CHAPTER II.—Elementary Illustration15 Diagrams—Daily Illustrated Newspapers—Pictorialv.Verbal Description.  CHAPTER III.—Artistic Illustrations40 Education of the Illustrator—Line Drawing for Process—Sketching from Life—Examples of Line Drawing.  CHAPTER IV —The Processes102 . “Photo zinco”—Gelatine Process—Grained Papers—Mechanical Dots—“Half-tone” Process—Wash Drawing—Illustrations from Photographs—Sketch,Graphic, &c.—Daniel Vierge. CHAPTER V.—Wood Engraving182 CHAPTER VI.—The Decorative Page197 CHAPTER VII.—Author, Illustrator, & Publisher211 Students’ Drawings223 Appendix233
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