The Auburndale Watch Company - First American Attempt Toward the Dollar Watch
19 Pages
English
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The Auburndale Watch Company - First American Attempt Toward the Dollar Watch

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19 Pages
English

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Project Gutenberg's The Auburndale Watch Company, by Edwin A. BattisonThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: The Auburndale Watch CompanyFirst American Attempt Toward the Dollar WatchAuthor: Edwin A. BattisonRelease Date: September 8, 2009 [EBook #29934]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE AUBURNDALE WATCH COMPANY ***Produced by Chris Curnow, ronnie sahlberg, Joseph Cooperand the Online Distributed Proofreading Team athttp://www.pgdp.netTranscribers note:Possible printer errors have been retained as they appear in the original book.The words (above) and (right) in illustration captions have been retained although in this ebookthey have no relevance.Contributions fromThe Museum of History and Technology:Paper 4The Auburndale Watch CompanyEdwin A. BattisonTHE INVENTION 51DEVELOPING THE INVENTION 53THE NEW SPONSOR 57SUCCESS AND FAILURE 64THE LESSON 67By Edwin A. BattisonTHE AUBURNDALE WATCH COMPANY:First American Attempt Toward the Dollar WatchThe life of the pioneer has always been arduous. Not all succeed, and many disappear leaving no trace on the pages of history. Here,painstaking search has uncovered enough of the record to permit us to review the errors of design and manufacture that brought failure ...

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The Auburndale Watch Company Edwin A. Battison THE INVENTION  51 DEVELOPING THE INVENTION  53 THE NEW SPONSOR  57 SUCCESS AND FAILURE  64 THE LESSON  67
Produced by Chris Curnow, ronnie sahlberg, Joseph Cooper and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
Contributions from The Museum of History and Technology: Paper 4
Transcribers note: Possible printer errors have been retained as they appear in the original book. The words (above) and (right) in illustration captions have been retained although in this ebook they have no relevance.
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F IGURE  1.— B REGUET ’S T OURBILLON . A T  C IS  SHOWN  THE  CARRIAGE  WHICH  REVOLVES  WITH  PINION  B CARRYING  THE ESCAPEMENT  AND  BALANCE  AROUND  THE  STATIONARY  WHEEL G. (A FTER G. A. B AILLIE , Watches, their history, decoration, and mechanism , London, Methuen, n.d.)
His solution was to mount the escapement in a frame or “chariot” which revolved, usually once a minute, so that with each revolution all possible positions were passed through (fig. 1 ). This gave the watch an average rate which was constant except for variations within the period of revolution of the chariot. Only a very skillful workman could, however, work with the delicacy necessary to produce such a mechanism. The result was that few were made and these were so expensive that it continued to be more practical to poise the parts in a conventional movement. The idea of revolving the entire train of a watch, including the escapement, seems to have evolved surprisingly slowly from Breguet’s basic invention of the revolving escapement. In constructing a watch wherein the entire train revolves, no such delicate or precise workmanship is required as in the tourbillon. Due to the longer train of gears involved the period of revolution is much slower. Position errors average out as certainly if not as frequently. In Bonniksen’s “Karrusel” watch of 1893 [2] the duration of a cycle is 52.5 minutes [3] while in the Auburndale Rotary which we are about to discuss the period of each revolution is 2-1 / 2 hours.
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F IGURE  3.— O RIGINAL  P ATENT  M ODEL  OF  THE  H OPKINS  W ATCH , U. S. P ATENT  161513, J ULY  20, 1875, NOW  IN  THE  U. S. National Museum ( cat. no. 309025).
Figure 2.—P ATENT D RAWING  OF  THE H OPKINS W ATCH . T HE  MAINSPRING  BARREL  E , OF  A  VERY  LARGE  DIAMETER  IN  PROPORTION to the diameter of the watch, occupies nearly the full diameter of the movement. The spring itself, narrower and much longer than usual, is made in the patent model by riveting two ordinary springs together end to end. Over THIS  BARREL  AND  ATTACHED  TO  THE  STATIONARY  FRAME  OF  THE  WATCH  IS  PLACED  A  LARGE  THIN  RING A, CUT  ON  ITS  INNER DIAMETER  WITH 120 TEETH . N EAR  ITS  EDGE  THE  BARREL E CARRIES  A  STUD  g  ON  WHICH  RUNS  A  PINION  OF 10 IN  MESH  WITH THE  RING  GEAR  A . O N  THIS  PINION  IS  A  WHEEL  OF 80 DRIVING  A  PINION  OF 6 ON  THE  ESCAPE -WHEEL  ARBOR . T HE 15-TOOTH ESCAPE  WHEEL  LOCKS  ON  A  SPRING  DETENT  AND  GIVES  IMPULSE  TO  THE  BALANCE  IN  ONE  DIRECTION  ONLY , BEING  A CONVENTIONAL  CHRONOMETER  ESCAPEMENT . T HE  INTERMEDIATE  WHEEL  AND  PINION , BALANCE  WHEEL , AND  BALANCE  COCK have been adapted from a Swiss bar movement of the time.
The second fault is in the ratio between the time of one revolution and the number of revolutions necessary for a day’s run. Three turns of the spring are, of course, required to run the watch for an hour, since the barrel and train revolve three times in that length of time. If we choose to have the watch run for 30 hours on a winding, and this leaves but a small safety factor, then we see that this will require 90 turns of the main spring, a manifest impossibility in view of the space available. [5]
Figure 5.—H OPKINS B ALANCE A RRESTING D EVICE , THE  SUBJECT OF U. S. PATENT 165830. T HIS  AND  THE  DEVICE  ILLUSTRATED IN  FIGURE  4  ORIGINALLY  WERE  SUBMITTED  TOGETHER  TO  THE P ATENT O FFICE  ON J UNE 9, 1875, AND  LATER  WERE  DIVIDED into two patents.
Probably no attempt was made to produce a finished and practical watch at this time, although Hopkins, the inventor, was an actual watchmaker as well as a retail jeweler, with premises virtually in the shadow of the Patent Office. He was a native of Maine [6] and had been established in Washington since 1863, or perhaps some time in 1862. [7]
F IGURE  4.— D RAWING  FROM U. S. P ATENT 165831, SHOWING  H OPKINS FIRST  DESIGN  IMPROVEMENT , AN  ARBOR  FOR  THE barrel and train to turn on and the balance displaced from center.
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