The Botanic Garden. Part II. - Containing the Loves of the Plants. a Poem. - With Philosophical Notes.
81 Pages
English
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The Botanic Garden. Part II. - Containing the Loves of the Plants. a Poem. - With Philosophical Notes.

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81 Pages
English

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Project Gutenberg's The Botanic Garden. Part II., by Erasmus DarwinThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: The Botanic Garden. Part II. Containing The Loves of the Plants. A Poem. With Philosophical Notes.Author: Erasmus DarwinRelease Date: January 11, 2004 [EBook #10671]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE BOTANIC GARDEN. PART II. ***Produced by Jonathan Ingram, Jayam Subramanian and PG Distributed Proofreaders[Illustration: FLORA at Play with CUPID.]THEBOTANIC GARDEN.PART II.CONTAININGTHE LOVES OF THE PLANTS.A POEM.WITHPHILOSOPHICAL NOTES.VOLUME THE SECOND.VIVUNT IN VENEREM FRONDES; NEMUS OMNE PER ALTUM FELIX ARBOR AMAT; NUTANT AD MUTUA PALMÆ FÆDERA, POPULEO SUSPIRATPOPULUS ICTU, ET PLATANI PLATANIS, ALNOQUE ASSIBILAT ALNUS.CLAUD. EPITH.THE SECOND EDITION.LONDON:PRINTED BY J. NICHOLS,FOR J. JOHNSON, ST. PAUL'S CHURCH YARD. M, DCC, XC.ADVERTISEMENT.The general design of the following sheets is to inlist Imagination under the banner of Science, and to lead her votariesfrom the looser analogies, which dress out the imagery of poetry, to the stricter ones, which form the ratiocination ofphilosophy. While their particular design is to induce the ingenious to cultivate the knowledge of BOTANY; by ...

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Project Gutenebgrs'T ehB tona Gicdear Pn.t ar,.II yb sarE suminThDarwBookis eof ri  ssu eht eonny aofheywane on ta erna tsoc mlso ton diwhta tions wh restricoY .am uostarevegit, ivecoy  ipyu-es reryao  twae ter thunde it ejorP eht fo smric Lrgbeenut Gctt ht sihooBero kseennc ideluwid etbnre.gent online atwww.gu
[Illustration: FLORA at Play with CUPID.]
THE BOTANIC GARDEN. PART II. CONTAINING THELOVES OFTHEPLANTS. A POEM. WITH PHILOSOPHICAL NOTES.
LONDON: PRINTED BYJ. NICHOLS, FOR J. JOHNSON, ST. PAUL'S CHURCH YARD. M, DCC, XC.
THE SECOND EDITION.
VOLUME THE SECOND. VIVUNT IN VENEREM FRONDES; NEMUS OMNE PER ALTUM FELIX ARBOR AMAT; NUTANT AD MUTUA PALMÆ FÆDERA, POPULEO SUSPIRAT POPULUS ICTU, ET PLATANI PLATANIS, ALNOQUEASSIBILAT ALNUS. CLAUD. EPITH.
Produced by Jonathan Ingram, Jayam Subramanian and PG Distributed Proofreaders
Title: The Botanic Garden. Part II. Containing The Loves of the Plants. A Poem. With Philosophical Notes. Author: Erasmus Darwin Release Date: January 11, 2004 [EBook #10671] Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE BOTANIC GARDEN. PART II. ***
isng ledht eo  fowinfolleetsg shi ot si mI tsilnioatinagr deunn EVDASITRENEMThT.gee ranemi eht tuo sserdh icwh, esgilonatcretsirht et  otry, poey ofagert dnel ocneia ,e oerScf e thnnbaolsorea or mht eotariesfad her vino  tishe tceduralucitr ngised ate ltivknowthe neoii gn oucsut thm rae octiatineno w ,shcihrof . While their paoi nfohplisopoyh airentttog he tmmi atronoiteht science,ightful moemdnnia dnr ceties vhe ttom heled taht fo elubANY; BOTe ofledgnitgdocunirtb  yygol fo nalPi stdes velid;rend aoconymo  feVegattion, the physioSUENNIL  eht nI.Pot rsfi Eor, emkr s lowehS fot shNawedilistturat ih saptaoi nfoe public. But thategselbo hteV fe thowgrff at ec dotopess pu yeby ma ther asasfa ,stnemelE eht f oontirape ohe tes. In the seconoien dnit ehn togevetita, onntmepxe mirestne no peatf resomeing ehp rot eso ruopheotano  fr,earyed si trt derrefarticulaf many preitseo lb erppothwildher hos haehT.tua lp rstna pag fewng aeptie(cxkr , sowt ih as,espre thm rof sraey ynam )seFOT EHP ALTN,Sw d poem, orLOVES tnest deht oeR echhis  irehere pet mS syNIENfoL , thaderxuale Seht htiw akramereexs  iUSd,neaipllba f ,e si ssel te,coo mdrousis eopteyrrrce thtrom want; and, f ot ,eruziel fo noane thy ifplamih snIt no.satiton, ditind esecoorccngdio  te thelur fo aroHh,ecoping to have rednredei  tomerw thy thorptceace  fo ecnalbup ehtbut ic,s atfindtg,hl ne teht ahndlaPon  iesin-mtlaS eht fo noitcrip des the andpi;aT lua dnso,an.etegioat ymoV fo ehtnocE poemon he firstev dott i  serom detresnowt htiwabnnCad  ire ais ,rOllsi ,nahcsiplanthe maryts Am er edaG niiroleaomerltioat anssto  flfwore;ss  additional printeate  bo, tedndsmucric ot ecnatles e matameor s .hwv zi rhtteehthn alec, yx norb snis etauto deALES, IcosandriatoX.II .WTNEYTM eht no detresni nsmeta StyenTw. ewlli  s ;sac-puowerr flyx o cal
PREFACE.
Linneus has divided the vegetable world into 24 Classes; these Classes into about 120 Orders; these Orders contain about 2000 Families, or Genera; and these Families about 20,000 Species; besides the innumerable Varieties, which the accidents of climate or cultivation have added to these Species. The Classes are distinguished from each other in this ingenious system, by the number, situation, adhesion, or reciprocal proportion of the males in each flower. The Orders, in many of these Classes, are distinguished by the number, or other circumstances of the females. The Families, or Genera, are characterized by the analogy of all the parts of the flower or fructification. The Species are distinguished by the foliage of the plant; and the Varieties by any accidental circumstance of colour, taste, or odour; the seeds of these do not always produce plants similar to the parent; as in our numerous fruit-trees and garden flowers; which are propagated by grafts or layers. The first eleven Classes include the plants, in whose flowers both the sexes reside; and in which the Males or Stamens are neither united, nor unequal in height when at maturity; and are therefore distinguished from each other simply by the number of males in each flower, as is seen in the annexed PLATE, copied from the Dictionaire Botanique of M. BULLIARD, in which the numbers of each division refer to the Botanic Classes. CLASS I. ONE MALE,Monandria; includes the plants which possess but One Stamen in each flower. II. TWO MALES,Diandria. Two Stamens. III. THREE MALES,Triandria. Three Stamens. IV. FOUR MALES,Tetrandria. Four Stamens. V. FIVE MALES,Pentandria. Five Stamens. VI. SIX MALES,Hexandria. Six Stamens. VII. SEVEN MALES,Heptandria. Seven Stamens. VIII. EIGHT MALES,Octandria. Eight Stamens. IX. NINE MALES,Enneandria. Nine Stamens. X. TEN MALES,Decandria. Ten Stamens. XI. TWELVE MALES,Dodecandria. Twelve Stamens.
iF terughe tas lee sinn  ehTxtnewo tla Cesssuishting dis areybt ln ytoo den qu eofr beum nhedetinusid dna laas in th males, levenelC ebavo e rutuieqseas bs,itidlanoa erda n
ATE MALES, the Odrre sra ehceilfreepntse.Iedthn lC e ssaFNOCREDE 2. Fig.Ordethe  nam retsir el sWO TsslaRHHEOTBRoN ,SDOO .iivx .nA dnit f olew.r of CLANhe Classro ,yar  ehtksidmpcondouf  oe thsso neenabrro  rs oforete flf th dehsiugnitsid ytylitier fhe tby
The next three Classes consist of plants, whose flowers contain but one of the sexes; or if some of them contain both sexes, there are other flowers accompanying them of but one sex. XXI. ONE HOUSE,Monoecia. Male flowers and female flowers separate, but on the same plant. XXII. TWO HOUSES,Dioecia. Male flowers and female flowers separate, on different plants. XXIII. POLYGAMY,Polygamia. Male and female flowers on one or more plants, which have at the same time flowers of both sexes.
In the next two Classes, not only the number of stamens are to be observed, but the reciprocal proportions in respect to height. XIV. TWO POWERS,Didynamia. Four Stamens, of which two are lower than the other two; as is seen in the two first Figures of No. xiv. XV. FOUR POWERS,Tetradynamia. Six Stamens; of which four are taller, and the two lower ones opposite to each other; as is seen in the third Figure of the upper row in No. 15. The five subsequent Classes are distinguished not by the number of the males, or stamens, but by their union or adhesion, either by their anthers, or filaments, or to the female or pistil. XVI. ONE BROTHERHOOD,Monadelphia. Many Stamens united by their filaments into one company; as in the second Figure below of No. xvi. XVII. TWO BROTHERHOODS,Diadelphia. Many Stamens united by their filaments into two Companies; as in the uppermost Fig. No. xvii. XVIII. MANY BROTHERHOODS,Polyadelphia. Many Stamens united by their filaments into three or more companies, as in No. xviii. XIX. CONFEDERATE MALES,Syngenesia. Many Stamens united by their anthers; as in first and second Figures, No. xix. XX. FEMININE MALES,Gynandria. Many Stamens attached to the pistil.
, and FUNGUSSES.ESSOM ,SSGALF ,Stee ars RNFEedrm eof ,htdrreruO INE DESTIAGEMARRas, lecuphhenS iup s'dre.oN .esr. Fi xiv. Ing. 5o htt eheh yret o nto twdeOr; rso nio enht f esethe seeds are inlcsodei  n aisile ,sessalC rehtola Che tngtiepxcaretefedC nossseClanand es,  Maldeso ni  eralcni ae,ins sia quliwore .iFW la-llfall the g. 4.In  fhtsno el;s eamthe  by atiositurO eht f si sredha che t oerctra ,sat ehc ahartcdestine Marriaged siitsiiugndehs oereaf Clchs asn maf teer o Ordt eh ..3F givx.i Che tind An. edtneserper si sel them. Imbers of yht eunamkrdeb , OD. NoTHROHOERO ssB ENht nalCe.etalP dexenn the an xiii. i efoN .osrFtgiruthn fie sel  iensi slew ylaca ;xhi ws,ennoo  dcherehda t eht ot yand Pol Froria.t  o m02tSma01 0nn aedexla P.Xte.IIINAM AM Y,SELofN .ox ii .nit ehTsalCoc sl eh tsahe plantntains tlfwore s shwso e, ormitsgmas sti eot ,raunbmb  eo  nvehantrepaap,selyts mus eht emales; (for, whre eht eiptsli s werh iteltwmave,seldna rht f eehcr w ihx .iN .oflows a sentepreeht ni dna ;elamofe urig Fstir faltno  fnesta p , one feone malei neoN ni saes sreh espri.. icwhnygirT , .c& ,aiEEHR Ta.ESALEM FLASEF MEygin ,iDnogy, Mo TWOnia.semaNO ,EF EELAMuingedshy  benthtsli,sa dnd siitf Females, or Pi oermbnue thn  odednuof era sess Clateenthirrst  eif fhtsro rOeda.mie ThypCrgatoAIRR ,EGNITSAM E. CLANDEble.XXIVidcsreinra eon txi.  Fv.. ig a3.5 dnehT.alC o ssf FOUR POWERS, i sidived dlaosi up cerowsud an; ah sa hcrieht evds c seeed; over sessai  noNnei vah ht ecus sa hnas d ker eiedsetoot mfotat ehb x, or fl thecaly OWT fo ssalC ehidiv dis, RSWEPOanutwt otn odei intors; Orderal estn s alfworew iii. which repreamdnf ynlameT.seh itnymaal m aessat hch  yamewtnsamethe  whi No. dna ;elx .oN nid ans lemafee on many feales andwtneytm rew ti hurigofe lae  Fsti dnht nelama ;s of guret Fifirsht ei  na)dnredeowfla s ntsereepr hcihw .iix .oN