The Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans 1814-1815
79 Pages
English

The Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans 1814-1815

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans 1814-1815, by G.R. GleigThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.orgTitle: The Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans 1814-1815Author: G. R. GleigRelease Date: June 1, 2006 [EBook #18479]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK BRITISH ARMY AT WASHINGTON ***Produced by Geoffrey CowlingThe Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans 1814-1815byRev. G. R. Gleig, M.A.,Chaplain-General to the forces;Author of 'The Subaltern'; 'Story of the Battle of Waterloo';'Life of Lord Clive'; 'Life of Sir Thomas Munro', etc.New Edition 1879ADVERTISEMENT.The following Narrative contains, it is believed, the only connected and authentic account, which has yet been given, ofthe expedition directed against Washington and New Orleans, towards the close of the late American war. It has beencompiled, not from memory alone, but from a journal kept by the author whilst engaged in the enterprise; and as theadventures of each were faithfully noted down as they occurred, and such remarks made upon passing events assuggested themselves to his mind at the moment, the public may rely with confidence upon general correctness of ...

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Published 08 December 2010
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The Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans 1814-1815 by Rev. G. R. Gleig, M.A., Chaplain-General to the forces; Author of The Subaltern'; 'Story of the Battle of Waterloo'; ' 'Life of Lord Clive'; 'Life of Sir Thomas Munro', etc.
New Edition 1879
ADVERTISEMENT. The following Narrative contains, it is believed, the only connected and authentic account, which has yet been given, of the expedition directed against Washington and New Orleans, towards the close of the late American war. It has been compiled, not from memory alone, but from a journal kept by the author whilst engaged in the enterprise; and as the adventures of each were faithfully noted down as they occurred, and such remarks made upon passing events as suggested themselves to his mind at the moment, the public may rely with confidence upon general correctness of the details. The issues of the expedition were not, indeed, of the most gratifying nature, but it is hoped that a plain relation of the proceedings of those to whom it was intrusted, will not, on that account, prove uninteresting; whilst nothing can be more evident than that the portion of our history which it embraces ought not to be overlooked because it is little conducive to the encouragement of national vanity. It was chiefly, indeed, upon this account, as well as with a view to redeem from an oblivion which they hardly merit, the actions and sufferings of a few brave men, that the Narrative now submitted to the public was written.
Produced by Geoffrey Cowling
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK BRITISH ARMY AT WASHINGTON ***
Title: The Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans 1814-1815 Author: G. R. Gleig Release Date: June 1, 2006 [EBook #18479] Language: English
exile till the vohh dad ewtli  nceeaPr. cein ws,dna rep enamp tnmthe froehelm, bnat b geaptr oedn ioatorerow ptoepoh yretser fo ria cnse sfot ehe throneed on ther ycalpcepxldeteslvne uthd seemeprasipa,dd ceetd eranhane mof o lliw eht hcihw s,iestnady; rstoret t sm nahsohtofe nq uliuaedfi1 18 4hsla lebpsoken of in otherhw ,eporirud hcimao  sngrsea ynyritaa mdI  toi.nthenwas t Eu thaou f hndf  or,wano t ,ecesrea flned bene hadgroaimesirseta hht e phe tthwid seeserusa fo tcepsoremoter rto hand  ,lbssseerecse tifs  ad,hi wll aemees tIeedni ,dduriing he lng tdab hch apssee ntsa
THE BRITISH ARMY AT WASHINGTON AND NEW ORLEANS.
CHAPTER I.
ti hdew asemht euptn abrwithess t hcihw  dah yeh; enisare thd annilfeucn efoc ahnges which aquar reta fonec yrutf  opira ane cndprodhad est onquraarht ei  ncudenegef  otsenemngaec ,yteicos larif bymagsed, as  eeftl ,ci ,otb t as bto aorlet gdel .deca ewonkCHAPTE .tSaeS tA.VI Ra llVisl'aechMiHCPA. . ac. rFnahael MicV.StTER ar MX. IERPTHA.C . . . hguoroblrmManghaottiI. NV IITPREC.AH . .. . . . tong. n W .XihsaPAHC RETburg . .Bladenshsnitgnohct  oaW. . . . . . . . er.BVIR  . .damuS aeatAPAET. HConto'sP Gad deltSteB .iden stceake ThrtPaenuxiracTehC ehasepCHAPTER VII. AmekaHttcahcAM raCHAP . . . .lt . . . . . . . . .I.II XERPTHA.C. la t . .RlaylH. .CHAPT. . . . raM Hhc RET.VIXMchchartalarSesburadenrlbogMa-htSorgudeciB ne.C. . .  XERPTHAihsaW .IlBnotgnndriaThe PatuxetnTehP tapacs o .ts . . . .CH .ETPAIX RA .Iaxelil BNegr . .ay .Proiasnayl toRIIXVR TESet  AI.. . . . PAHC. . aThe Blue MountKnisgotnaJamciTh. Ble  MuentousniaPAHC RETIIVXTPREC.AH . . . .. . . . s . ndielayoR troPseidn IstWee Th. VI XoPotamcnethT ehe PatuxER XV. TeW eI tseS thTaeaapAkee ThesChdA .IXX tAecnavarMcktaacttAchrtaekeRperatrPns .atio . . . .laH tAtkcateiF oldBaf lettos-Hipat l . . . . .. . . . .CHAPTERe Thdansl InePiraMgnidnaLekaL. . . . alt chHX .XTPREC.AH . .anleLasNeaOrw iPeI enB ekngro. . . . sland . REX XI . .C.AHTP. . . . .navahanameR skr .CHAPTER XXV. Hha. . . . . . . acPeeegnnvaHaeMekaL eiSeliboTER CHAP. ThXXIV. . tl. . . . . aertaHtaerteRtfos Rer rapaontiaCpmPerII IhT eAPTER XX . . .CH. . . . noitakramb-eRekacttAsePuaertaRteatkc. AtXXIITER CHAPihhcd siitgniuhsed the spring ofecudeb ,erofeht ig my htenev wts thtt ahsp e ealges of a prowill ew nahtyna evahn soea rctpeextoof mankitiments ediced ddnm ro e tin cheoct r cudna nes idnonoitm suITNOOVUL AER
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Such being my own feelings, and the feelings of the great majority of those immediately around me, it was but natural that we should turn our views to the only remaining quarter of the globe in which the flame of war still continued to burn. Though at peace with France, England, we remembered; was not yet at peace with the United States; and reasoning, not as statesmen but as soldiers, we concluded that she was not now likely to make peace with that nation till she should be able to do so upon her own terms. Having such an army on foot, what line of policy could appear so natural or so judicious as that she should employ, if not the whole, at all events a large proportion of it, in chastising an enemy, than whom none had ever proved more vindictive or more ungenerous? Our view of the matter accordingly was, that some fifteen or twenty thousand men would be forthwith embarked on board of ship and transported to the other side of the Atlantic; that the war would there be carried on with a vigour conformable to the dignity and resources of the country which waged it; and that no mention of peace would be made till our general should be in a situation to dictate its conditions in the enemy's capital. Whether any design of the kind was ever seriously entertained, or whether men merely asserted as a truth what they earnestly desired to be such, I know not; but the white flag had hardly been hoisted on the citadel of Bayonne, when a rumour became prevalent that an extensive encampment of troops, destined for the American war, was actually forming in the vicinity of Bordeaux. A variety of causes led me to anticipate that the corps to which I was attached would certainly be employed upon that service. In the progress of the war which had been just brought to a conclusion, we had not suffered so severely as many other corps; and though not excelling in numbers, it is but justice to affirm that a more effective or better organized battalion could not be found in the whole army. We were all, moreover, from our commanding officer down to the youngest ensign, anxious to gather a few more laurels, even in America; and we had good reason to believe that those in power were not indisposed to gratify our inclinations. Under these circumstances we clung with fondness to the hope that our martial career had not yet come to a close; and employed the space which intervened between the eventful 28th of April and the 8th of the following month, chiefly in forming guesses as to the point of attack towards which it was likely that we should be turned. ENCAMPMENT NEAR PASSAGES.
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