The Cornwall Coast
349 Pages
English

The Cornwall Coast

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Cornwall Coast, by Arthur L. SalmonThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: The Cornwall CoastAuthor: Arthur L. SalmonRelease Date: October 13, 2008 [EBook #26907]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE CORNWALL COAST ***Produced by Dave Morgan, Chris Logan and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.netFrontispiece.A High Sea on the North Cornwall Coast.From a photograph by Mr. Alexander Old, Padstow.A HIGH SEA ON THE NORTH CORNWALL COAST.The CornwallCoastBy Arthur L. SalmonIllustratedAdelphi Terrace,W.C.T. Fisher UnwinLondon: Adelphi TerraceLeipsic: Inselstrasse 201910[All rights reserved.]ROAD MAPS FOR THE CORNWALL COASTThose who travel through Cornwall by cycle or motor-car will usually find very good roads, but for the most part these onlytouch the coast at special points; and in some cases it will be wise to leave bicycle or car at hotel or farm if the coast is tobe fitly explored. The study of a map will show the tourist what to expect, and he may note the parts where, if he thinks ofeasy travelling alone, he will have to desert the sea. But by a judicious use of high-road and by-road he need never be farfrom the shore, and in some places the road ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Cornwall Coast,
by Arthur L. Salmon
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Cornwall Coast
Author: Arthur L. Salmon
Release Date: October 13, 2008 [EBook #26907]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
THE CORNWALL COAST ***
Produced by Dave Morgan, Chris Logan and the
Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.netFrontispiece.
A High Sea on the North Cornwall Coast.
From a photograph by Mr. Alexander Old, Padstow.
A High Sea on the North Cornwall Coast.
The Cornwall
Coast
By Arthur L. Salmon
Illustrated
Adelphi Terrace, W.C.
T. Fisher Unwin
London: Adelphi Terrace
Leipsic: Inselstrasse 20
1910
[All rights reserved.]
ROAD MAPS FOR THE
CORNWALL COASTThose who travel through Cornwall by cycle or motor-
car will usually find very good roads, but for the most
part these only touch the coast at special points; and
in some cases it will be wise to leave bicycle or car at
hotel or farm if the coast is to be fitly explored. The
study of a map will show the tourist what to expect,
and he may note the parts where, if he thinks of easy
travelling alone, he will have to desert the sea. But by
a judicious use of high-road and by-road he need
never be far from the shore, and in some places the
road that is actually best for him gives fine views of
the coast. There are many excellent maps issued, but
it is best to go to the fountainhead, to the publications
of the Ordnance Survey. For the pedestrian those of
one inch to a mile are admirable; but the cyclist or
motorist will find the two miles to an inch more handy,
as covering a wider range; and even those of four
miles to the inch are sufficiently full for the motorist. If
any special district is to be carefully explored, the one
mile to an inch should be carried, but the wise rider will
not content himself with a map of a single scale; he
should at least carry one for the entire Duchy and
others for the sections.
The maps of the Ordnance Survey for Cornwall are as
follow:—
One mile to the inch, large series, in sheets about 27
× 18 inches, paper (flat or folded), 1s. 6d. net;
mounted, 2s.; cut into sections and mounted to fold,
2s. 6d., Nos. 139, 146–7–8, 151–2.
One mile to the inch, small series, in contouredoutline, with hills shaded or coloured, Nos. 347, 353,
1s. 6d. and 2s.; 348, 354, 1s. and 1s. 6d.; 322, 336,
1s. 6d. and 2s.; 335, 346, 1s. and 1s. 6d.; 351, 359,
1s. and 1s. 6d.; 352, 360, 1s. 6d. and 2s. These may
be had flat or folded.
Two miles to an inch (flat or folded, or on the new
layer system), Nos. 35–6, 1s. 6d., 2s., 2s. 6d.
Four miles to the inch, Cornwall, 1s. (flat or folded).
Four miles to the inch, Nos. 21, 22, 1s. 6d., 2s. (flat or
folded).
Ten miles to the inch, No. II. (flat or folded), 1s., 1s.
6d.
It should be mentioned that Mr. T. Fisher Unwin is sole
wholesale agent for these maps, which may be
procured from any bookseller. Fuller details of the
maps are given in a special Catalogue issued by Mr.
Unwin.
A. L. S.
CONTENTS
CHAPTER PAGE
I. THE PLYMOUTH DISTRICT 13
II. LOOE AND POLPERRO 29
III. FOWEY 48
IV. ST. AUSTELL TO ST. MAWES 66
V. FALMOUTH AND TRURO 81FROM FALMOUTH TO THE LIZAR
VI. 106
D
VII. THE LIZARD TO HELSTON 126
VIII. MOUNT'S BAY 150
IX. THE PENZANCE DISTRICT 167
X. THE SCILLY ISLANDS 190
XI. FROM LAND'S END TO ZENNOR 211
XII. ST. IVES 231
XIII. FROM HAYLE TO PERRAN 253
CRANTOCK, NEWQUAY, MAWGA
XIV. 271
N
XV. THE PADSTOW DISTRICT 301
XVI. TINTAGEL AND BOSCASTLE 335
XVII. BUDE 354
XVIII. MORWENSTOW 363
INDEX 381
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
PAGE
LOOE33
Photo by Gibson & Sons
FOWEY55
Photo by Gibson, Penzance
ON THE RIVER FAL83
Photo by Gibson & Sons
COVERACK119Photo by Gibson & Sons
THE LIZARD LIGHTHOUSE129
Photo by Gibson & Sons
BENCH-ENDS IN MULLION CHURCH133
Photo by Gibson & Sons
MARCONI STATION, POLDHU139
Photo by Gibson & Sons
PRUSSIA COVE155
Photo by Gibson & Sons
ST. MICHAEL'S MOUNT, FROM MARAZION161
Photo by Gibson & Sons
PENZANCE171
Photo by Gibson & Sons
LANYON CROMLECH181
Photo by Gibson & Sons
SHIPMAN HEAD, SCILLY191
Photo by Gibson & Sons
A SCILLY FLOWER GARDEN201
Photo by Alex. Old
CAVERN AT LAND'S END213
Photo by Gibson, Penzance
SENNEN COVE219
Photo by Gibson & SonsGURNARD'S HEAD227
Photo by Gibson & Sons
ST. IVES233
Photo by Gibson & Sons
CHURCH OF ST. PIRAN267
Photo by Gibson & Sons
CRANTOCK CHURCH283
Photo by Alex. Old
BEDRUTHAN STEPS293
Photo by Alex. Old
MAWGAN CHURCH297
Photo by Alex. Old
PORTHCOTHAN BAY303
Photo by Alex. Old
RUINS OF CONSTANTINE CHURCH307
Photo by Alex. Old
TREVOSE LIGHTHOUSE311
Photo by Alex. Old
CLIFFS NEAR PADSTOW317
Photo by Alex. Old
A ROUGH CORNISH SEA323
Photo by Alex. Old
WADEBRIDGE327
Photo by Alex. OldPORT ISAAC331
Photo by Gibson & Sons
TINTAGEL337
Photo by Gibson & Sons
KING ARTHUR'S CASTLE343
Photo by Alex. Old
ST. KNIGHTON'S KIEVE349
Photo by Alex. Old
MORWENSTOW367
Photo by Gibson & Sons
The Cornwall Coast
CHAPTER I
THE PLYMOUTH DISTRICT
Britain is an emergent mass of land rising from a
submarine platform that attaches it to the Continent of
Europe. The shallowness of its waters—shallow
relatively to the profundity of ocean deeps—is most
pronounced off the eastern and south-eastern coasts;
but it extends westward as far as the isles of Scilly,
which are isolated mountain-peaks of the submerged
plateau. The seas that wash the long Cornish
peninsula, therefore, though they are thoroughly
oceanic in character, especially on the north, are not
oceanic in depth; we have to pass far beyond Scilly to
cross the hundred-fathom line. From the Dover strait
westward there is a gradual lowering of the incline,though of course with such variations and undulations
as we find on the emerged plains; but the existence of
this vast submarine basis must cause us to think of
our island, naturally and geologically, as a true part of
the great European continent, rendered insular by the
comparatively recent intrusion of shallow and narrow
waters. With some developments and some limits, our
flora and fauna are absolutely Continental, the limits
being even more noticeable as regards Ireland. The
extensive coast-line has played a most important part
in influencing national history and characteristics. The
greater or less resistance of different rocks and soils
has affected not only coast-configurations, but
therewith also the very existence and well-being of the
inhabitants.
The very appearance of Cornwall is eloquent of its
granitic structure; nothing less enduring could have
survived the stress to which it is daily exposed. All
softer measures have been eroded by the fierce wash
of Atlantic seas; what we may consider a gaunt, bare
backbone has stood the test, and the Cornish coast
to-day confronts forces that would play havoc with the
more yielding and gentle curves of east and south-
east England. We know what the narrow seas can do
on East-Anglian and Kentish shores; and the same
work of coast-erosion that we there see proceeding
before our very eyes must have taken place in
Cornwall before the days when historians could note it.
The denudations that left our stark Cornish coasts as
we know them now for the most part occurred in times
that are dim and legendary. We hear of the havoc by
an uncertain voice of tradition; we dream of a lost land
of Lyonesse, of which only the Scillies remain; but the