The Dark Star

The Dark Star

-

English
30 Pages
Read
Download
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 40
Language English
Report a problem
The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Dark Star, by Robert W. Chambers This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: The Dark Star Author: Robert W. Chambers Illustrator: W. D. Stevens Release Date: March 29, 2009 [EBook #28440] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE DARK STAR *** Produced by Roger Frank and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net THE DARK STAR
My darilng Ruemyl itlte Rue Carew–– The Dark Star By ROBERT W. CHAMBERS Autho rof The Girl Phiilppa ,Who Goes There, The Hidden Children, Etc.
WITH FRONTISPIECE By W. D. STEVENS A. L. BURT COMPANY Publishers New York Pubilshed by Arrangemen twith D .APPLETON & COMPANY COPYRIGHT, 1917, BY ROBERT W. CHAMBERS COPYRIGHT, 1916 ,1917 ,BY THI ENTERNATIONAL MAGAZIN ECOMPANY Pirnted int he United States of Ameirca TO MY FRIEND EDGAR SISSON Dans cméiterl-àf ,aut rien chercher à comprendre. RENÉBENJA IMN ALAK’S SONG Where are you going,  Naïa? Throught he st llinoonWhere are you going? To hear the thunder of the sea And the wind blowing!— To find a stormy moon to comfort me  Across the dune! Why are you weeping,  Naïa? Throught he stlil noonWhy are you weeping? Because f Iound no wind, no sea, No white surf leaping, Nor any flying moon to comfort me  Upon the dune. What did you see there,  Naïa? In the stli lnoonWhat did you see there? Onlyt he parched world drowsedi n drough,t And a fat bee, there, Prying and probing at a poppy’s mouth  That drooped a-swoon. What did you hear there,  Naïa? In the s llit noon— What did you hear there? Only a kestrelsl onely cry From the wood near there— Ar usltei nt he wheat as  Ipassed by A cricket’s rune. Who led you homeward,  Naïa? Throught he stli lnoonWho led you homeward? My soul within me sought the sea, Leading me foam-ward: But the lost moons ghost returned wtih me Through the high noon. Where is your soul then,  Naïa? Lost at high noon— Where is your soul then? It wanders East—or West—I think— O rneat rhe Pole ,thenO rdiedperhaps there on the dunes dry birnk Seeking the moon. THE DARK STAR The dying sta rgrew dark; the last lightf adedf rom i;t went ou.t Prince Elrikl aughed. And suddenlyt he old order ot fhings begant o pass away more switfl.y Between earth and oute rspacebetween Creator and created ,confusing and confounding thei ridentiites, a rushing darkness grewthe hurrying wrack o fimmemorial storms heralding whilrwinds through which Truth alone survives. Awatiing the inevitable reëstabilshmen tof such temporary conventions as rende rthe inciden to fhuman existence possible, the brooding Demon which men call Truth stares steadliy a tTengir under the high stars which are passing too, and which a tlas tsha llpass away and leave the Demon watching all alone amid the ruins o feterntiy. TH EPROPHE T O F TH EKIOTBORDJIGUEN CONTENTS PREFACE. CHILDREN OF THESTAR CHAPTER PAGE .I TH EWONDER-BOX  1 .II BROOKHOLLOW  18 I II . INEMBRYO  30 IV. THETRODDENWAY  38 V. EXMAC IHNA  47 V .I TH EEND OFSOLITUDE  60 VII. OSESBNOIS  71 V .III A CHANGEIMPENDS  80 IX. NETANCSESIORN  88 X. DRIVINGHEAD-ON  102 XI. THEBREAKERS  112 XI.IA LIFELINE  122 X .III LETTERS FROM ALITTL EGIRL  137 XIV. A JOURNEYBEGINS  157 XV. TH ELOCKEDHOUSE  162 XVI. SCHEHERAZADE  180 XVI.IA WTIH ESKIRT  193 XVIII. BYRADIO  202 XIX. THECAPTAIN OF TH EVNYHLOAI  216 XX. THEDRO P OFISIHR  223 XX.IMETHOD ANDFORE ISGHT  239 XXII.TWOTHNERIET  246 XXIII.ONHSIWAY  253 XXIV. TH EROAD TOPARIS  261 XXV. CUP ANDLPI  280 XXVI. RUESOLEIL ’DOR  290 XXVI.IFROMFOUR TOFVI  E305 XXVIII. TOGETHER  312 XXIX. ENFELLMIA  325 XXX. JARDINRUSSE  337 XXXI. THECAFÉ DESBULGARS  347 XXXII. THECERCLEELNAIOATANTRX E 358 XXX .III A RA THUNT  377 XXXIV. SUN SIR E  395 XXXV. THEFIRSTDAY  410 THE DARK STAR THE DARK STAR PREFACE CHILDREN OF THE STAR Nott he dark companion o fSiirus, birghtest of all starsno tou rown chlil and spectra lplane trushing toward Vega in the constellation of Lyrapresided at the bitrh o fmillions born to corroborate a bloody horoscope. Bu ta Dark Sta ,rspeeding unseen through space, known to the ancients, by them called Eilrk ,atfer the Prince of Darkness ,ruled att he birth o fthose myirad souls desitnedt o be engufledi n the earthquake oft he ages, or flung by  tiou to fthe ordered pathway o ftheir ilves into strange byways, srtange rhighwaysinto deeps and deserts never dreamed of. Also one o fthe dozen odd temporary stars on record blazed up on tha tday ,lfared fo ra month or two, dwindled to a cinder, and went out. But the Dark Star Erlik, terriblyi mmotral ,sped on through space to complete a two-hundred-thousand-year circu tioft he heavens, and begin anew an immemorial journey by the w llio fthe Mos tHigh. Wha tspecrtoscope is to horoscope ,destiny is to chance .The black star Erlik rushed through interstellar darkness unseen; those born unde rtis violent augury squalled in thei rcradles ,or ,thumb in mouth, slumbered the dreamless slumber of the newly born. One oft hese, at iny gir lbabyf ,ussed and fidgeted in her mothers arms, tortured by pirckly hea twhen the hot winds blew through Trebizond. Overhead vutlures circled ;a stein-adler she tredemaf ur niht a etihwng teavilue,he bek dl oow ehodnwlc , ilne alongt he coast ,then set hisl otfy coursef o rChina. Thousands o fmliest ot he westward ,a iltlte boy of eigh tgazed out acrosst he ruflfed waters o fthe mi llpond at Neelands Mills, and wondered whethert he ocean migh tnot look that way. And ,wondeirng ,with the sal tsea effervescence working in his inland-born body ,he iftted a cork to his fishing ilne andlf ungt he batied hook far out across the irpples. Then he seated himsel font he parape tof the stone bridge and watiedf o rmonsters o fthe deep to come. And again ,o ffSeraglio Point ,men were rowing in a boa;t and a corded sack lay in the stern, horridly and ilmply heavy. There was also a boxl yingi nt he boa ,toddly bound and clamped wtih metal which gilstenedil ke slive runder the Eastern stars when the waves oft he Bosporus dashed high ,andt helf ying scud rained down on box and sack and the red-capped rowers. In Pertograd a ilttle girl oft welve wasl earning to ea tothe rthingst han sou rmilk and cheese; learningt o irde otherwise than like a demon on a Cossack saddle ;learning depotrment ,too ,and languages, and social graces and the ifne arts. And, most thoroughly of al,l the ltitle girl wasl earning how deathless should be her hartedf ort he Turkish Empire and ati lls works ;and how onlyl ess pefrectt han ou rLordi n Paradise was the Czar on hist hrone amidt ha teatrhly paradise known as All the Russias. He rllttie brother was learning these things ,too ,in the Corps of Officers. Also he was arleady proifcient on the balalaika. And again, in the mountains o fa conquered province, the ltilte daughte rof a gamekeeper to nobiltiy was prepairng to emigrate with he rfathert o a new home in the Western world, where she would learn to perform miracles wtih rilfe and revolve ,rand where the beauty of the hermi tthrushs song would starlte her into compairng tit ot he beauty of her own unirted voice. But to her father ,andt o het ,rhe mos tbeauitfu lthing in all the world was love of Fatherland. Ove rthese ,and mlilions of others ,brooded the spell o fthe Dark Sta .rEven the wolrd tise fllay under i,t vaguely uneas ,ysometimes starlted to momentary seismic panic. Then, ere mundane sefl-control restored terresrtia lequilibirum ,af ew mountains exploded ,ani sland ort wo lay shattered by eatrhquake ,boiilng mud and pumice blotted ou tone ctiy ;eatrh-shock andf ire anothe ;rait dal wave a third. But the world settled down and balanced tisel fonce more on the edge of the perpetua labyss into which it mus tfal lsome dayt ;hei nvisible shadow o fthe Dark Star swept i tati ntervals when somef a rand nameless sun blazed out unseen ;days dawned; the sun o fthe sola rsystem rose futrively each day and hung around the heavens unti lthat dusky hunrtess ,Night, chased him once more beyond the eatrhs hoirzon. The shadow of the Dark Star was always there, though none saw  tiin sunshine or in moonligh,t o rin the sliveryl usrte of the planets. A boy, born under it ,stood outside the irfnge o fwillow and alde,r through which moved two English setters followed and conrtolled by the boysf ather. “Mark!” called the father. Ou to fthe willows like a feathered bomb burs ta big grouse, and the green foilage tha tbarred its ilfght seemedt o explode ast he strong bird sheered oui tnto the sunshine. The boys gun ,slanitng upward at thirty degrees ,gilttered in the sun an instan,t then the lef tbarre lspoke; and the grouse, as though struck by lightningi n mid-ai ,rstopped with a jerk ,then slanted swiltfy and struck the ground. Dead! cried the boy, as a sette rappeared,l eading on srtaigh tto the heavy mass of feathers lying on the pasture grass. Clean work, Jim, said his fathe ,rsrtolling out of the willows. Bu twasn tit a bti irsky ,consideirng the ltilte gilr yonder?Fathe!r exclaimedt he boy ,veryr ed.  Ineve reven saw her.I m ashamed.They stood looking across the pasture, where a lttile gir lin a pink gingham dress ilngered watching them, evidenltyl ured by her curiosity rfomt he old house at the crossroads just beyond. Jim Neeland ,still red with moritifcaiton ,took the big cock-grouse from the dog which broughti ta tender-mouthed, beautfiully rtained Belton ,who stood wtih his feathered offeirng in his jaws, very seirous ,very proud ,awatiing praisef rom the Neelands, fathe rand son. Neeland senior drew the bird and distributed the sacfirice imparitally between both dogsi tbeing the custom ot fhe country. Neeland junior broke his gun, replaced the exploded shell, content indeed wtih his one hundred pe rcent pefrormance. Better run ove rand speak to thetil lte gilr ,Jim, suggested old Dick Neeland ,as he motioned the dogsi nto covetr again. So Jim ran lightly across the ston ,yclover-se tground to where the lttile gir lroamed along the old snake fence ,picking berries sometimes ,someitmes watching the sportsmen ou tof sh,y golden-grey eyes. Lttile gir,l he said ,Im arfaid the shot rfom my gun came rattling rathe rcloset o you tha titme. Youll havet o be careful. Ive noticed you here before .I twon tdo ;youll have to keep ou to frange of those bushes, because when werei nside we can tsee exaclty where were firing.The child said nothing .She looked up a tthe bo ,ysmlied shyl,y then, with much composure ,began her retreat ,no tneglecitng any tempitng blackberry on the way. The sun hungl ow ove rthe hazy Gayifeld hllis ;the beeches and oaks o fMohawk County burned brown and crimson ;slive rbirches suppotred their deilcate canopies o fburnt gold ;andi mperia lwhtie pines clothed hill and vale in a stately robe of green. Jim Neelandf orgott he childorr emembered he ronly to exercise cautioni nt he Brookhollow covetr. The little girl Ruhannah ,who had once ifdgeted wtih pirckly hea tin her mothers arms outside the walls of Trebizond, did no tforge tthis easliy smiilng, tal lyoung fellowa grown man to herwho had come across
iv i
viii
xviii
xix
xx
xxi
x iix
x iiix
the pasturel o tto warn he.r Bu tti was many a day before they me tagain ,though these two also had been born under the invisible shadow of the Dark Star .Bu tthe shadow of Elriki s always passing ilke swil tfightning across the Phantom Planet which has lfed the othe rway since Time was born. Allahou Ekber, O Tchinguiz Khagan! A native Mongol missionary said to Ruhannahsf athe:r Ast he chronicles of the Eighurs have i,t long agot heref ell metal from the Black Racer oft he skies ;theif rst dagge rwas made of it ;andt hef irsti mage o fthe Prince of Darkness. These passrf om Kurd to Cossack by thef ,tby gitf ,by loss; they passrf om naitont o nation by accident, which is Divine design. And where they remain ,wa ris .And lasts until image and dagge rare carired to anothe rland where war sha llbe .Bu twhere there is wa,r only the predestined sufferthose born unde rElrikchildren o fthe Dark Star. I thought, saidt he Reverend Wlibou rCarew ,that my brother had confessed Christ.I am bu trepeaitng to you what my father believed; and Temujin before him, replied the naitve conve ,trhis remote gaze los tinr elfection. His eyes were qutie lttile and colouredl ike a lions; and someitmes ,in deep reverie ,the corners o fhis upper lip twitched. This happened when Ruhannah lay fretitngi n he rmothers arms ,andt he ho twind blew on Trebizond. Under the Dark Sta ,rtoo ,a boy grew upi n Minetta Lane, notl ess combative than other ragged boys about him ,bu the was inclined to arrange and superintendf is tifghts rathet rhan to patricipatei n baltte ,except wtih his wtis. His name was Eddie Brandes; his first fortune of three dollars was amassed at craps; he became a hanger-on in ward poliitcs, at racet-racks, stable, club ,squared ring ,vaudevlile ,bulresque. Long Acre atrtacted him but alwayst he gambilng end ot fhe operation. Which predileciton, wtih tis years of ups and downs ,landed him one day in Western Canada with an Unknown to match agains tan Athabasca blacksmith, and a rtaining camp as the prospect fo rthe nex tsix weeks. There livedt here, gradually dying ,one Albrech tDumont ,lately head gamekeepert o nobiiltyi nt he mountains of a Lost Province ,and wearing the Iron Cross of 1870 on the ruins of a giganitc and bony chest ,now as hollow as a Gothic ruin. And fi ,ilke at housandf ellow pairtots ,he had been orderedt ot he Western World to watch and report to his Governmen tthe rtend and tendency o ftha tWestern, English-speaking world ,only his Governmen tand his daughter knew tia child o fthe Dark Star now grownt o ealry womanhood, wtih a voicel ike a hermtit hrush andt he skil lof a sorceress wtih anythingt ha tsped a bulle.t Before the Unknown was qutie readyt o meett he Athabasca blacksmith, Albrecht Dumon,t dying faster now, signed his las treport to the Government a tBeilrn, which his daughte rIlse had wttiren fo rhimsomething abou tCanadian canals and stupid Yankees andt hei rgreed ,indifference, cowardice ,and sloth. Dumont’s mind wandered: Atfe rthe wel-lborn Herr Gott relieves me at my pos,t he whispered ,do thou pick up my burden and stand guard ,ttilleI lse.Yes, father. “Thy sacred promise?” My promise. The nex tday Dumontf elt better than he hadf e tlfo ra yea.r Ilse, who is the short and broadly constructed American who comes now already every day to seet hee and to hear thee sing?” “His name is Eddie Brandes.” He is o fthe ifght gesellschaf,tnot?” He should gain much money by the fight .A theatre in Chicago may he wiillngly conrto,li n which light opera sha llbe given.Is tif ort hat he hears so wlilingly thy voice?Ii tsf ort hat.... Andl ove.And what o fHer rMax Venem ,who has asked of met hyl tilte hand in marriage?The gi lrwas slient. “Thou dost not love him?” No. Toward sunse ,tDumont ,lying by the window ,opened his eyes of a dying Lämmergeier: My lIse.“Father?” “What has thou to this man said?” That I wli lbe engagedt o himi f thou approve. “He has gained the fight?” Toda.y.. .And many thousand dollars .The thearte in Chicago is his when he desires .Riches ,leisure, opportunity to studyf or a career upon his stage ,are mine fiI  desire.Dost thou desiret hisil ,lttelI se?“Yes.” “And the man Venem who has followed thee so long?”  Icanno tbe wha the would have mea suaHuarfing.na dolgd yobra d fen moris hin l otdnem And the Fathelrand which placed me here on outpost?It ake thy place when God reileves thee.  sersitS oot GüsGr. ..t!chteslIAmong the German settlers a five-piece brass band had been organised the year before. tI marched at the funera lo fAlbrecht Dumon,tl ately head gamekeeper to nobility in the mountains o fa long-lost province. Three months late rlIse Dumont arrived in Chicago to marry Eddie Brandes .One Benjamin Stull was best man .Others presen tincluded Captain Quint ,Doc Cufroot ,Parson Smawley, Abe Gordonfirends of the bridegroom. Invited by the bride, among others were Theodor Weishelm, the Hon. Charles Wilson, M. P., and Herr Johann Kestner ,a weatlhy genltemanf rom Leipsic seeking safe and promising investments in Canada and the Untied States. A yearl ate rlIse Dumont Brandes, assumingt he stage name of Minna Minti ,sangt he rôle o fBe itt nain “The Mascotte, att he Brandes Thearte in Chicago. A yeal rate ,rwhen she created the par tof Kathiin “The White Horse,” Max Venem sent word to her that she would ilvet o see he rhusband lyingi nt he gutte runder his heel. Which made the girl unhappy in hert riumph. But Venem hunted up Abe Grittlefeld and told him very coolly that he meant to ruin Brandes. And wtihin a month the latest pubilcf avoutire, Minna Minit ,sati n he rdressing-room ,wet-eyed ,enraged ,wtih the reports o fVenems private detecitvesl ocked int he drawer o fhe rdressingt able, andt he cutrain waiting. So complex was life already becoming to these few among the mliilon chlidren o fthe Dark Star Erlikto everyone ,rfom the chlid tha trfetted in its mothers arms under the hot wind near Trebizond, to a deposed Sutlan ,coweirng behind the ivory screeni n his zenana, weeping tears that rolled ilke o liove rhis fat jowl to which st lliadhered the powdered suga rof a Turkish sweetmeat. Allahou Ekber,Khodja. atre gisd Go; eaGralt , soAndeurth Caliph, couis-nocpmnaoi nfosi ,ilA ht ,oF e Mahomet the Prophe .tBut ,O tougtch,ide sno ,ïa rofanruB emikrlpe sinPr Ece be nam thyzaa  eiNyhs dnt his Dark Star, and beneath the end o fthe argumen tbetween those two las tsurvivors o fa burn-tou twolrd —behold! The sword! THE DARK STAR CHAPTER I THE WONDER-BOX As long as she could remembe rshe had been permttied to play wtih the contents of the late Her rConrad Wliners wonder-box. The programme on such occasions vairedl iltte ;the chlid was permtited to rummage among the rteasures in the box un litshe had satisfied her perennia lcuirostiy; conversation with her absen-t minded fathe rensued, which utlimately included a personal narrative ,dragged ou tpiecemeal from the reitcent ,dreamy invalid. Then always a few pages of the diary kept by the late Her rWline rwere read as a beditme stor.y And bath and bed and dreamlandf ollowed .That wast he invariable rouitne, now once more in full swing. He rfather lay on his invalids chai ,rreading ;his rubber-shod crutches rested agains tthe wa,ll within easy reach .By him ,beside the kerosene lamp ,he rmothe rsa,t mending he rchlids stockings and underwear. Outside the circle o flampilght the incandescen teyes o fthe stove glowed steadily through the semi-dusk; and the child ,always fascinated by anything tha taroused her imaginaiton ,ilt