The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. IX
331 Pages
English
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The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. IX

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Learn all about the services we offer
331 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. IX, by Various
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Title: The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. IX
Author: Various
Editor: Jared Sparks
Release Date: July 18, 2009 [EBook #29438]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE ***
Produced by Frank van Drogen, Chris Logan and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF/Gallica) at http://gallica.bnf.fr)
THE
DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE
OF THE
AMERICAN REVOLUTION.
VOL. IX.
THE
DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE
OF THE
AMERICAN REVOLUTION;
BEING
THE LETTERS OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, SILAS DEANE, JOHN ADAMS, JOHN JAY, ARTHUR LEE, WILLIAM LEE, RALPH IZARD, FRANCIS DANA, WILLIAM CARMICHAEL, HENRY LAURENS, JOHN LAURENS, M. DE LAFAYETTE, M. DUMAS, AND OTHERS, CONCERNING THE FOREIGN RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES DURING THE WHOLE REVOLUTION;
TOGETHER WITH
THE LETTERS IN REPLY FROM THE SECRET COMMITTEE OF CONGRESS, AND THE SECRETARY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.
ALSO,
THE ENTIRE CORRESPONDENCE OF THE FRENCH MINISTERS, GERARD AND LUZERNE, WITH CONGRESS.
Published under the Direction of the President of the United States, from the original Manuscripts in the Department of State, conformably to a Resolution of Congress, of March 27th, 1818.
EDITED
BY JARED SPARKS.
B
VOL. IX.
O
NATHAN HALEANDGRAY & BOWEN;
G. & C. &. H. CARVILL, NEW YORK; P. THOMPSON, WASHINGTON.
1830.
Steam Power Press—W. L. Lewis' Print.
No. 6, Congress Street, Boston.
V
CONTENTS
N
OF THE
WILLIAM
O
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[Pg v]
T
U
O
H
M
N
E
:
.
CARMICHAEL'S
CORRESPONDENCE.
To the Committee of Secret Correspondence. Amsterdam, November 2d, 1776, Sent by Mr Deane on a mission to Berlin. —Disposition of the Dutch.—Financial credit of the different powers.—Credit of the United States.—Plan for attacking the English coasts. —The conduct of Congress in relation to Portugal has made a favorable impression.—Offers of a House in Amsterdam to discount bills of Congress, drawn on certain conditions.
To William Bingham, at Martinique. Paris, June 25th to July 6th, 1777, Reasons for opening a correspondence with him. —Causes of the temporising policy of France. —The English loan completed at home.—Dispute between Spain and Portugal.—Warlike preparations of France and Spain.
To the President of Congress. Yorktown, June 17th, 1778, Receives information of his appointment as Secretary to the Commissioners.
To the President of Congress. Off Reedy Island, November 25th, 1779, Acknowledges the reception of certain resolutions of Congress.
To the President of Congress. Martinique, December 27th, 1779, Naval operations of the English and French in the West Indian Seas.
To John Jay. Madrid, February 18th, 1780, Interview with the Count de Florida Blanca, who promises to answer Mr Jay's letter.—Advises Mr Jay to prepare for a journey to Madrid.—Mr Lee's correspondence.
Page
5
14
19
19
20
[Pg vi] 21
To the President of Congress. Madrid, February 19th, 1780, Favorable reception.—Kindness of the French Ambassador and of M. Gerard.—English forces.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Aranjues, May 28th, 1780, Difficulty of communication.—Dispositions of the Spanish Court.—English policy in Spain. —Dispositions of the other European powers. —Bills on Mr Jay.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, July 17th, 1780, Mr Cumberland, English agent at Madrid.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Ildefonso, August 22d, 1780, Finances of Spain.—Mr Cumberland.—Armed neutrality.—Naval forces and operations of France and Spain.—M. Gardoqui succeeds M. Miralles.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Ildefonso, September 9th, 1780, Failure of the Spanish loan attributed to M. Necker.—Scheme of the loan.—Unsettled policy of Spain.—Armed neutrality.—The navigation of the Mississippi the chief obstacle to the opening of negotiations with Spain.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Ildefonso, September 25th, 1780, Supplies from Spain.—Conference with the Count de Florida Blanca.—The Count declares that Spain will never relinquish the exclusive navigation of the Mississippi.—Finances of the belligerent powers.—The Count de Montmorin.
St
St
St
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, October 15th, 1780, The Spanish government finds it difficult to raise money.—The armed neutrality and Holland. —Revolt in Peru.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, November 28th, 1780, Finances and financial operations of Spain. —Vigorous preparations of England.—Spain aims at the exclusive possession of the Gulf of Mexico.—The European powers are jealous of the House of Bourbon.—Suggests the expediency in securing the alliance of Spain by further concessions.—Proceedings in Holland. —The Count de Vergennes informs Mr Jay that
23
24
30
32
38
43
47
50
[Pg vii]
France cannot pay the bills drawn on him.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, December 19th, 1780, Amount of bills drawn on Mr Jay.—Accession of Holland to the armed neutrality.—Disposition of the Emperor.—Mr Cumberland continues to reside at Madrid.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, January 4th, 1781, England declares war against Holland.—Supplies promised by Spain.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, January 29th, 1781, Offer of mediation by the German Emperor and the Empress of Russia.—Spanish policy in regard to America.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, February 22d, 1781, Supplies.—Imperial offer of mediation.—Russia unfavorably disposed towards England.—English preparations.—French preparations.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, March 4th, 1781, M. Gardoqui.—The correspondence of the American Ministers is known to the European governments, by opening the letters.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, March 11th, 1781, Mr Cumberland intends to leave Spain.—Naval forces of the belligerents.—Bad consequences of the mutiny of the Pennsylvania line.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Aranjues, May 25th, 1781, Secret armament preparing at Cadiz.—Difficulty of communicating safely with America.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Aranjues, May 26th, 1781, Naval operations.—Supplies granted by France. —Probable destination of the force raising in the South of Spain.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Aranjues, June 2d, 1781, Dismission of M. Necker disagreeable to the Court of Spain.—M. Necker not favorable to the granting of supplies to the United States.—His
56
58
59
62
66
68
69
70
72
character.—Proposed mediation by the Court of Vienna.
James Lovell to William Carmichael. Philadelphia, June 15th, 1781, His communications have been valuable to Congress.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Ildefonso, August 16th, 1781, Progress of the negotiations.—Loans raised by Spain.—Bills on Mr Jay.—Apprehensions that the demands of Spain may delay the general peace.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Ildefonso, September 28th, 1781, The Court promises to appoint a person to treat. —M. Del Campo.—Little prospect of a general negotiation.
St
St
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, October 5th, 1781, No progress has been made in the negotiation. —Complaints against Commodore Gillon.—The rebellion in Peru quelled.
To the Committee of Foreign Affairs. Madrid, November 17th, 1781, Arrest of an English agent.—No progress towards opening a conference with Mr Jay.—Animosity of the Irish at the Spanish Court against America. —Account of M. Cabarrus.—Spanish expedition against their Colonies.—French naval expeditions.—State of affairs in Holland and France.
Robert R. Livingston to William Carmichael. Philadelphia, December 20th, 1781, Mr Carmichael's communications valuable to Congress.—Commodore Gillon is not in a United States ship.—Delays of Spain beget feelings of ill-will in America.—Evacuation of Wilmington.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, December 20th, 1781, Motives of his correspondence.—Delays of Spain.—General satisfaction in Spain at the capture of Lord Cornwallis.—Imperial and Swedish Ambassador desire to favor the trade with America.—Advances by M. Cabarrus. —State of the sieges of Gibraltar and Mahon. —M. Cabarrus's plan of a new bank.—Spain endeavors to discourage the commerce of foreigners in her ports.—Attempt to exclude salt-fish, by the sale of indulgences permitting the
[Pg viii]
74
75
78
81
84
91
94
use of meat on fast days.—Character of the Spanish Ministry.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, December 24th, 1781, Mr Jay receives promises of supplies.—The Count de Florida Blanca also promises to interfere with Portugal in favor of the United States.—Probable consequences of the death of the Empress.—Proceedings of England.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, Feb. 18th, 1782, Difficulty of meeting the drafts.—Financial embarrassments of the Spanish Court. —Capitulation of Mahon.—Imperial mediation. —Reply of Lord Stormont to the proposal.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, February 27th, 1782, Mr Jay is unable to obtain supplies.—No progress made toward negotiations.—The King of England is said to be determined to push the war in America.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, April 14th, 1782, Mr Jay obliged to protest bills.—Conduct of the Spanish Minister on this occasion.—The Spanish Court delays negotiations from policy.—Colonial disturbances.—Reforms of the Emperor.
Robert R. Livingston to William Carmichael. Philadelphia, May 1st, 1782, Desires a continuance of his correspondence. —Affair of Captain Huddy.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, June 12th, 1782, The Spanish Ministers show no inclination to treat.—Jealousy of the House of Bourbon among the European powers.—Financial difficulties of Spain.—Siege of Gibraltar.
Robert R. Livingston to William Carmichael. Philadelphia, July 6th, 1782, Complains of want of information.—Payment of salaries.
To Robert R. Livingston. St Ildefonso, July 8th, 1782, Interview with the Count de Florida Blanca. —Conversation with M. Del Campo.—New offer of mediation from the Imperial Courts.
102
[Pg ix]
105
111
113
120
122
124
126
To Robert R. Livingston. St Ildefonso, July 22d, 1782, Count de Florida Blanca's answer to the proposed mediation.—The neutral powers desire a Congress.
To Robert R. Livingston. St Ildefonso, September 8th, 1782, Interview with the Count de Florida Blanca.
Robert R. Livingston to William Carmichael. Philadelphia, September 12th, 1782, State of affairs in America.
To Robert R. Livingston. St Ildefonso, September 29th, 1782, Failure of the attack on Gibraltar.—Financial embarrassments of Spain.—State of the negotiations at Paris.—The preparations for war continue.
Count de Florida Blanca to William Carmichael. St Lorenzo, October 14th, 1782, The English frigate carried into Cadiz by American seamen is ordered to be sold, and the proceeds to be deposited to the credit of Congress.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, October 29th, 1782, The progress of the negotiations will be impeded by Spain.
Robert R. Livingston to William Carmichael. Philadelphia, November 28th, 1782, America will make no peace inconsistent with her engagements to her allies.—State of the military forces in America.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, December 10th, 1782, Terms of the treaty between Great Britain and the United States.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, December 30th, 1782, Dissatisfaction of Spain with the conclusion of the treaty.—Letter from M. de Lafayette. —Financial operations in Spain.—Receives the ceremonial visits of theCorps Diplomatique. —Intends to leave Spain, if the Court does not change its conduct.—Divisions in Holland.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, January18th,
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132
135
[Pg x]
137
141
142
144
147
149
1783, Interruptions of the communication with America. —Endeavors to induce the Ministry to receive him formally.—M. Gardoqui will soon be despatched on a mission.—The Ministry desires peace.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, February 21st, 1783, Is formally received asChargé d'Affairesthe of United States, through the influence of M. de Lafayette.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, March 13th, 1783, Dines with the Count de Florida Blanca. —Supposed motives of the offer of mediation by the Imperial Courts.—Reported confederacy of Russia, Austria, and Prussia for the partition of Turkey.—State of affairs in England.—Friendly propositions from other powers.—The army and navy commissaries have agreed to obtain supplies from America.—Proposes M. Josè Llanos as Minister to the United States. —Recommends the nomination of distinguished Spaniards as members of American societies.
Robert R. Livingston to William Carmichael. Philadelphia, May 7th, 1783, The past conduct of Spain has not been such as to conciliate America.—She ought not to exclude America from the privileges allowed to Great Britain.—Operations of the provisional treaty.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, July 19th, 1783, Receives assurances of the favorable disposition of the King.—The Spanish-Americans treat him as their countryman.—Plans of Austria and Russia.—Mr Fox raises difficulties to the conclusion of the Definitive Treaty.—Points in the treaty with Spain.—Spanish expedition against Algiers.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, July 22d, 1783, Dispersion of the armament against Algiers by stress of weather.—Slow progress of the negotiations at Paris.
From the Saxon Minister in Spain to William Carmichael. Madrid, July 28th, 1783, Establishment of commercial relations with America.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, July 29th,
154
158
161
[Pg xi]
169
172
179
181
1783, Proceedings relative to the formation of commercial connexions between Saxony and the United States.—Treaty between France, Spain and Portugal.
To Robert R. Livingston. Madrid, August 2d, 1783, M. Thieriot appointed Saxon Commissary-General of Commerce in America.
To Robert R. Livingston. St Ildefonso, August 30th, 1783, Interview with the Count de Florida Blanca. —Objections of that Minister to his presentation. —Second interview on the same subject.—The King consents to fix a day for his presentation. —The presentation.
JOHN LAURENS'S
CORRESPONDENCE.
Instructions to John Laurens. In Congress, December 23d, 1780,
Additional Instructions to John Laurens. In Congress, December 27th, 1780,
To the President of Congress. Philadelphia, January 3d, 1781, Method of obtaining supplies.
To the President February 4th, 1781, Delay of his departure.
of
Congress.
To the President of Congress. February 7th, 1781, Preparations for sailing completed.
Boston,
Boston,
To the President of Congress. L'Orient, March 11th, 1781,
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201
[Pg xii]
203
204
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