The First Seventeen Years: Virginia 1607-1624
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The First Seventeen Years: Virginia 1607-1624

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The First Seventeen Years: Virginia1607-1624, by Charles E. HatchThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: The First Seventeen Years: Virginia 1607-1624Author: Charles E. HatchRelease Date: December 28, 2009 [EBook #30780]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE FIRST SEVENTEEN YEARS: ***Produced by Paul Dring, Mark C. Orton and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.netTranscribers note:Extensive research has found no evidence of copyright renewal for this work.Matoaka als Rebecka daughter to themighty Prince Powhatan Emperour ofAttanoughkomouck als virginia convertedand baptized in the Christian faith, and wifeto the worshipful Mr. John Rolff Matoaka alsRebecka daughter to the mighty PrincePowhatan Emperour of Attanoughkomouckals virginia converted and baptized in theff rChristian faith, and wife to the wor M JohRolffFrom Weddell, A Memorial Volume of Virginia Historical PortraitureTHE FIRST SEVENTEEN YEARSVirginia, 1607-1624Charles E. Hatch, Jr.The University Press of VirginiaCharlottesvilleCOPYRIGHT©, 1957 BYVIRGINIA 350TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONCORPORATION, WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIATenth printing 1991PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICAThe University ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The First Seventeen
Years: Virginia
1607-1624, by Charles E. Hatch
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The First Seventeen Years: Virginia 1607-1624
Author: Charles E. Hatch
Release Date: December 28, 2009 [EBook #30780]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
THE FIRST SEVENTEEN YEARS: ***
Produced by Paul Dring, Mark C. Orton and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.netTranscribers note:
Extensive research has found no evidence of
copyright renewal for this work.
Matoaka als Rebecka daughter to the mighty Prince
Powhatan Emperour of Attanoughkomouck als virginia
converted and baptized in the Christian faith, and wife
to the worshipful Mr. John Rolff Matoaka als Rebecka
daughter to the mighty Prince Powhatan Emperour of
Attanoughkomouck als virginia converted and baptized
ff rin the Christian faith, and wife to the wor M Joh Rolff
From Weddell, A Memorial Volume of Virginia
Historical Portraiture
THE FIRST SEVENTEEN YEARS
Virginia, 1607-1624
Charles E. Hatch, Jr.
The University Press of Virginia
CharlottesvilleCOPYRIGHT©, 1957 BY
VIRGINIA 350TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
CORPORATION, WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA
Tenth printing 1991
PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
The University Press of Virginia / Charlottesville

CONTENTS
Foreword
The Start of Colonization 1
The Establishment of Jamest
4
own
Summer and Fall, 1607 5
The Three Supplies, 1608-16
6
10
1
A Critical Hour
0
1
Order and More Stable Ways
2
1
Tobacco
61
Yeardley and Argall
8
2
A New Approach
1
2
Yeardley and Wyatt
6
2
Virginia and the Dissolution
9
The Spread of Settlement—1 3
607 to 1624 4
Towns, Plantations, Settleme 3
nts, and Communities in Virgi 2
nia: 1607-1624 (numbers are ,
keyed to text and to illustratin 3
g map) 3
3
1. Pasbehegh Country—1617
5
3
A. Argall Town—1617
6
3
B. Pasbehegh—c.1617
7
3
C. "the Maine"—1608
7
2. Smith's (Southampton) Hu 3
ndred—1617 8
3. "Tanks Weyanoke"—c.161 4
8 1
4
4. Swinhows—before 1622
3
4
5. Westover—c.16195. Westover—c.1619
3
6. Berkeley Town and Hundre 4
d—1619 4
7. Causey's Care (or "Cleare" 4
)—c.1620 6
8. West and Shirley Hundred 4
—c.1613 7
9. Upper Hundred-"Curls"—c. 4
1613 9
10. "Diggs His Hundred"—c.1 4
613 9
11. The "citty of Henricus" (H 5
enrico)—1611 0
5
12. Arrahatock—before 1619
2
13. The College Lands—c.16 5
19 3
5
14. The Falls—1609
6
5
15. Falling Creek—c.1619
7
16. Sheffield's Plantation—bef 5
ore 1622 9
17. Proctor's Plantation—befo 6
re 1622 0
6
18. Coxendale—c.1611
0
19. "Bermuda Citty" (Charles 6
City) Incorporation 2
66
A. Bermuda Hundred—1613
2
6
B. Rochdale Hundred—1613
3
6
C. Bermuda City—1613
3
20. Piercey's Plantation—c.16 6
20 6
6
21. Jordan's Journey—c.1619
7
22. Woodleefe's Plantation—c 6
.1619 8
23. Chaplain's Choice—c.162 6
3 8
24. Truelove's Plantation—c.1 6
621 9
25. "Powle-brooke" or Mercha 7
nt's Hope—1619 0
26. Maycock's Plantation—c.1 7
618 1
27. Flowerdieu Hundred-Pierc 7
ey's Hundred—c.1618 1
28. "Captaine Spilmans Divide 7
nt"—before 1622 3
29. Ward's Plantation—c.161 7
9 3
7
30. Martin's Brandon—c.1617
5
7
31. "Paces-Paines"—1620
7
77
32. Burrow's Mount—c.1624
8
33. Plantations "Over the river 7
from Jamestown" 9
A. Treasurer's Plantation (Ge 8
orge Sandys)—c. 1621 0
B. Hugh Crowder's Plantation 8
—c.1622 1
C. Edward Blaney's Plantation 8
—c.1624 1
D. Capt. Roger Smith's Planta 8
tion—c.1622 2
E. Capt. Samuel Mathews' Pl 8
antation—c.1622 2
8
34. Hog Island—1609
3
8
35. Lawne's Plantation—1619
5
36. Warrascoyack (Bennett's 8
Plantation)—1621 6
8
37. "Basse's Choyse"—1622
9
8
38. Nansemond—1609
9
39. The Eastern Shore—c.16 9
14 0
40. Elizabeth City (Kecoughta 9
n)—1610 3
9
41. Newport News—1621
81
42. Blunt Point—c.1621 0
1
1
43. Mulberry Island—c.1617 0
2
1
44. Martin's Hundred—1618 0
4
1
45. Archer's Hope—c.1619 0
7
1
46. "Neck-of-Land neare Jam
0
es Citty"—before 1624
9
1
Selected Readings 1
2
1
Appendix; Supplies for Virgini
1
a
4
FOREWORD
The colonization of Virginia was a mammoth
undertaking even though launched by a daring and
courageous people in an expanding age. The meager
knowledge already accumulated was at hand to draw
on and England was not without preparation to push
for "its place in the sun." There was a growing navy,
there was trained leadership, there was capital, there
was organization and there were men ready to makethe gamble for themselves and to the glory of God
and for their country.
It remained for the Virginia Company of London, under
its charter of April 10, 1606, to found the first
permanent English settlement in America. This
company, a commercial organization from its
inception, assumed a national character, since its
purpose was to "deduce" a "colony." It was
instrumental, under its charter provisions, in
guaranteeing to the settlers in the New World the
rights, freedoms, and privileges enjoyed by
Englishmen at home as well as the enjoyment of their
customary manner of living which they adapted to their
new environment with the passage of years. Quite
naturally the settlers brought with them their church
and reverence for God, maintained trial by jury and
their rights as free men, and soon were developing
representative government at Jamestown.
The immediate and long-range reasons for the
settlement were many and, perhaps, thoroughly
mixed. Profit and exploitation of the country were
expected, for, after all, this was a business enterprise.
A permanent settlement was the objective. Support,
financial and popular, came from a cross section of
English life. It seems obvious from accounts and
papers of the period that it was generally thought that
Virginia was being settled for the glory of God, for the
honor of the King, for the welfare of England, and for
the advancement of the Company and its individual
members.
In England, and in Virginia, they expected and did